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cailleask
May 6, 2007



With my puppy, if I caught her in the act of peeing I did have to make the negative-sound noise (ah! ah! ah!) while picking her up and moving her outside. Not to scare her or as a punishment - but to let her know I didnít particularly like what she was doing. Follow-up with tons of praise outside, and thatís what helped it click on her brain that pee inside == mom no likey, while pee outside == yum treats.

Otherwise she seemed to understand that I liked pee outside just fine, but didnít seem to get that pee inside wasnít also a fine alternative.

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DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Xarthor posted:

Sheís a ninja whizzer. Silent and always when least expected. Never caught her in the act even once.

Ah that old chestnut. Nine months is prime testing-boundaries age too. Are you crate training her? It might be time to crate when she isnít able to be supervised. Our first pup took almost a year to be fully housebroken and the solution was to just not let him be unsupervised ever.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

cailleask posted:

With my puppy, if I caught her in the act of peeing I did have to make the negative-sound noise (ah! ah! ah!) while picking her up and moving her outside. Not to scare her or as a punishment - but to let her know I didnít particularly like what she was doing. Follow-up with tons of praise outside, and thatís what helped it click on her brain that pee inside == mom no likey, while pee outside == yum treats.

Otherwise she seemed to understand that I liked pee outside just fine, but didnít seem to get that pee inside wasnít also a fine alternative.

Agreed. A mild correction is fine. Anything stronger can sometimes lead the dog to just hide when they need to go because they equate the punishment with what they are doing rather than where.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Also for what itís worth, our first dog was the worst with regard to housebreaking. We now have three dogs and have fostered multiple puppies and every single one of them minus the first was housebroken within 4-6 weeks. You learn SO MUCH from that first one!

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



Shebrew posted:

I’m about to adopt a dog who’s approximately 2 years old, from Romania, and with an unknown background. According to his foster mom (who will have had him for about a week when we pick him up) he‘a afraid of men. I’m prepping my flat as much as possible to help set him up for success when he arrives, and other than having my boyfriend be in charge of feeding and otherwise be extra quiet around him and give him space, I’m looking for any tips. Any other ideas to set things up so my pup will be be able to be able to be comfortable around men?

I've been thinking about this post for a while. Is it at all possible for you to spend time alone to build up trust with the dog before introducing a trigger? You'll be much better set up for success if the introduction to your boyfriend is done from a state of calm trust. You don't mention how severe the problem is, "afraid" could be anything from nervous to potentially aggressive.

Shebrew
Jul 12, 2006

Is it a party?

Bundy posted:

I've been thinking about this post for a while. Is it at all possible for you to spend time alone to build up trust with the dog before introducing a trigger? You'll be much better set up for success if the introduction to your boyfriend is done from a state of calm trust. You don't mention how severe the problem is, "afraid" could be anything from nervous to potentially aggressive.

Iím not really sure. All I have to go on is what the foster mom has told me so far. From what I gathered, he doesnít get aggressive, he just shuts down. The good news is that heís apparently very good motivated and loves chicken. The foster mom says heíll accept chicken from her husband, even though heís afraid to eat around him otherwise.

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



Doesn't sound too bad then, make that first encounter as positive as possible and don't make a big fuss when the dog shuts down, just don't let them avoid or flee (certainly don't entice with chicken while avoiding, that will reinforce that response). With a nervous dog, "this is normal and you are safe" (this being your usual environment) is an important early understanding.

I'd certainly try and have the first thing the dog notices when entering the home for the first time is boyfriend hand with raw chicken in it, ready right at nose level.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

My shiny boi is snoozing

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

one step done and another begun


Nap Ghost

DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

Also for what itís worth, our first dog was the worst with regard to housebreaking. We now have three dogs and have fostered multiple puppies and every single one of them minus the first was housebroken within 4-6 weeks. You learn SO MUCH from that first one!

They also learn from each other - when I brought home my new rescue he watched (and sniffed) my other dog go outside and immediately knew 'here is the bathroom', and the lack of any similar scents indoors helped him know that inside was not.

Hot Dog Day #82
Jul 5, 2003



Soiled Meat

So it looks like my wife and I will be fostering a golden retriever for a bit, since itís owner is unemployed now and having trouble affording the pup. I know that goldens are notorious for shedding, but if we regularly groom the dog would that be able to mitigate the whole ďhair getting everywhereĒ thing? Are there any hot tips for living with a dog that sheds frequently? I own a poodle, so I havenít had to deal with this side of dog ownership before.

Away all Goats
Jul 5, 2005

Goose's rebellion


Brushing the dog everyday (preferably outside) does help a lot but you will still find hair in random places, just less of it.

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



Yeah just accept it now, hope you have a good vacuum cleaner!

Medullah
Aug 13, 2003

FEAR MY SHARK ROCKET IT REALLY SUCKS AND BLOWS


The Furminator brush is really great. Sadly my dog hates it so I can only get a few good brushes in before she scatters away.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Medullah posted:

The Furminator brush is really great. Sadly my dog hates it so I can only get a few good brushes in before she scatters away.

My hound girl loves the Furminator even though she doesnít really need it since she has very short fur.

My shepherd mix who sheds constantly HATES it with a fiery passion and heís the one who needs it the most.

Dogs

Hot Dog Day #82
Jul 5, 2003



Soiled Meat

Well fantastic, thanks for the advice guys! Does anyone have a vacuum cleaner with a grooming attachment? Iíve never been able to have a dog who wants to be in the same room as the vacuum, but if they are worthwhile I have no problem shoveling treats into the future pups mouth to get him used to it!

MadFriarAvelyn
Sep 25, 2007



Personal Earpiece

Behavioral question. My 1 1/4 year old corgi Teddi and I have had a pretty regular walking routine for a while now, almost since I got him. We walk 3-4 miles a day over the course of four walks. However over the past three days or so he's been absolutely resisting going back into my apartment complex at the end of a walk. I'll redirect his facing forward when it happens, but we'll move a few feet and then he'll turn around and try and lunge backwards as far as his leash will let him. Once we manage to get inside of the apartment complex, if I let go of his leash he'll run straight for the exit. This behavior persists up until we get to the elevator, at which point he...goes back to being his usual cheerful self?

I'm at a loss at what could be causing this behavior, and was wondering if anyone had something similar happen with their dog and any suggestions for how to resolve the issue?

If it's related, he isn't neutered yet (something that had to be delayed thanks to COVID-19 and a related pay cut), but that's next on my list of to-dos for when I have the funds available.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

MadFriarAvelyn posted:

Behavioral question. My 1 1/4 year old corgi Teddi and I have had a pretty regular walking routine for a while now, almost since I got him. We walk 3-4 miles a day over the course of four walks. However over the past three days or so he's been absolutely resisting going back into my apartment complex at the end of a walk. I'll redirect his facing forward when it happens, but we'll move a few feet and then he'll turn around and try and lunge backwards as far as his leash will let him. Once we manage to get inside of the apartment complex, if I let go of his leash he'll run straight for the exit. This behavior persists up until we get to the elevator, at which point he...goes back to being his usual cheerful self?

I'm at a loss at what could be causing this behavior, and was wondering if anyone had something similar happen with their dog and any suggestions for how to resolve the issue?

If it's related, he isn't neutered yet (something that had to be delayed thanks to COVID-19 and a related pay cut), but that's next on my list of to-dos for when I have the funds available.

Did something bad happen to him in the recent past in the lobby? Definitely sounds like heís equating a bad experience with going inside. I guess it could also be that he just doesnít want to go home yet but itís weird for that to crop up repeatedly out of nowhere.

MadFriarAvelyn
Sep 25, 2007



Personal Earpiece

DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

Did something bad happen to him in the recent past in the lobby? Definitely sounds like heís equating a bad experience with going inside. I guess it could also be that he just doesnít want to go home yet but itís weird for that to crop up repeatedly out of nowhere.

Nothing recently (he did have a bad run in with a dog around there a year ago, but the dog and the dog's owner moved out a while back so that isn't an issue anymore), but maybe it is an issue with the lobby? There's a side entrance I can use to get in the building, I can give that a shot with the next walk to see how it goes.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

MadFriarAvelyn posted:

Nothing recently (he did have a bad run in with a dog around there a year ago, but the dog and the dog's owner moved out a while back so that isn't an issue anymore), but maybe it is an issue with the lobby? There's a side entrance I can use to get in the building, I can give that a shot with the next walk to see how it goes.

Hmm, strange. I could definitely see some reluctance immediately following a bad incident but it sounds like he was fine for a year up until now? Try the side door and see what happens. If heís still showing reluctance maybe try treating/lots of praise when he goes into the lobby to try to induce a more positive reaction.

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



MadFriarAvelyn posted:

Nothing recently (he did have a bad run in with a dog around there a year ago, but the dog and the dog's owner moved out a while back so that isn't an issue anymore), but maybe it is an issue with the lobby? There's a side entrance I can use to get in the building, I can give that a shot with the next walk to see how it goes.

Don't avoid, deal. If you start avoiding the lobby you'll reinforce that the dog should. It's normal to go through the lobby so make sure you're as calm as possible when returning. Don't push on through returning home until the dog is calm at the threshold to the lobby, then you walk in. If pooch kicks off as you go to walk in, repeat. The message is that progression (and treats) occur when calm pup is calm and trusting the leader (you).

Shebrew
Jul 12, 2006

Is it a party?

Nugget arrived today! He isnít as freaked out by my fiancť as I was worried heíd be. We just brought him home a few hours ago, but heís mostly freaked out and shut down. He ate some kibble out of our hands which is good, and accepts chicken from both of us

One of my big concerns right now is the stairs and his leash. When we put the harness and leash on him, he basically shuts down and wonít accept chicken or anything. As a result, Iím not sure how to leash train him if he wonít eat with his harness on. We also have stairs (we live in an apartment) which he refuses to do, and the inability to bribe him down the steps means weíve carried him thus far.

I should note that weíve had him like 4 hours, so it might also be that he needs to decompress. Iíd appreciate any other advice re training and helping him relax as well

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

one step done and another begun


Nap Ghost

Try working up to the harness/leash and the stairs? Maybe just try showing him the harness and giving a treat, then move to touching him with the harness, putting it on but not buckling it, etc etc. Same with the stairs, try giving a treat for just approaching them, for touching them, for getting up on the first step, etc. Try to break it down until you find what he will do and work up from there.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Shebrew posted:

Nugget arrived today! He isnít as freaked out by my fiancť as I was worried heíd be. We just brought him home a few hours ago, but heís mostly freaked out and shut down. He ate some kibble out of our hands which is good, and accepts chicken from both of us

One of my big concerns right now is the stairs and his leash. When we put the harness and leash on him, he basically shuts down and wonít accept chicken or anything. As a result, Iím not sure how to leash train him if he wonít eat with his harness on. We also have stairs (we live in an apartment) which he refuses to do, and the inability to bribe him down the steps means weíve carried him thus far.

I should note that weíve had him like 4 hours, so it might also be that he needs to decompress. Iíd appreciate any other advice re training and helping him relax as well

Yeah he needs to decompress and get used to the new environment. You arenít really going to see his personality come out for a while. A good rule of thumb for milestones ď3 days, 3 weeks, 3 monthsĒ. I wouldnít be worried about leash training and whatnot right now. Focus on creating a calm, welcoming environment where he can start to feel comfortable.

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



Also ditch the harness and when they're settled use something that sits well at the top of the neck so you can communicate effectively via the leash.

Shebrew
Jul 12, 2006

Is it a party?

Bundy posted:

Also ditch the harness and when they're settled use something that sits well at the top of the neck so you can communicate effectively via the leash.

The foster mom said that he reacted really poorly to a neck-based collar and recommended a harness instead. Think itís better to ease him into something neck-based?

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.



Stick with the harness. Communicate with your voice and your body, no need to use leash pressure on an anxious dog.

The books Help For Your Fearful Dog by Nicole Wilde and A Guide for Living With and Training a Fearful Dog by Debbie Jacobs are supposed to be good resources.

Chimp_On_Stilts
Aug 31, 2004
Holy Hell.

I'm a new first time dog owner. The lil' guy is 14 weeks old.

We've been following the bite training best practice of starting with allowing him to mouth our hands (to teach being gentle), then moving to not biting at all.

When should we move from allowing mouthing to not allowing teeth on skin at any time?

He has definitely learned how to be gentle, his mouthing is super soft unless he's riled up. However, when he's riled up he will still bite pants or an arm - not ferociously or aggressively, but certainly in a way we need to train out of him. Given his age, I think this is still normal.

So, how do we choose when to begin the zero tolerance phase? Wait for a certain age? Wait for a certain behavior? Somehow ease from phase 1 to phase 2 over the course of x weeks?

In case it matters: Yelling "ouch!" and freezing had little or no impact on him. We found much more success with isolating him or, if not an option, holding him behind us with the leash and ignoring him for a minute or so. Is it concerning that the "ouch!" method hasn't worked?

MF_James
May 8, 2008
I CANNOT HANDLE BEING CALLED OUT ON MY DUMBASS OPINIONS ABOUT ANTI-VIRUS AND SECURITY. I REALLY LIKE TO THINK THAT I KNOW THINGS HERE

INSTEAD I AM GOING TO WHINE ABOUT IT IN OTHER THREADS SO MY OPINION CAN FEEL VALIDATED IN AN ECHO CHAMBER I LIKE


Chimp_On_Stilts posted:

In case it matters: Yelling "ouch!" and freezing had little or no impact on him. We found much more success with isolating him or, if not an option, holding him behind us with the leash and ignoring him for a minute or so. Is it concerning that the "ouch!" method hasn't worked?

He is likely not associating the OUCH with anything, you probably need to use it + ignoring/isolating until he understands that ouch is bad.

smoobles
Sep 4, 2014



An adorable baby opossum has moved into our yard, and we have nightly encounters with the little guy now. It's definitely here to stay. Any suggestions on getting our small dogs to tolerate/ignore it?

Our younger dog is chill and will find it and bark a few times to inform us "holy poo poo I found the opossum!", but the older one is way too aggressive and goes on the warpath every night, and I'm fairly sure he bit the little guy on his butt once.

smoobles fucked around with this message at 19:25 on May 22, 2020

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_brushtail_possum

Chimp_On_Stilts
Aug 31, 2004
Holy Hell.

Two issues, both related to playing fetch.

1:
Training my puppy is going well overall, but I haven't been able to teach him to fetch yet.

Occasionally he will fetch properly - I throw a (rubber) stick, he runs to it, picks it up, and carries it back to me. When he does this, I offer copious praise and treats.

But this hasn't resulted in consistency. I still get moments where he watches me throw the stick, stays seated in place, then looks at me like "cool throw bro" then wanders off to eat a leaf.

Or, there are moments when he sprints to the stick, sniffs it, then comes back to me.

When he doesn't get it right I don't offer reinforcement. I just quietly walk to the stick and try again.

Is this alone sufficient to get him to learn to fetch eventually, or do I need a more structured approach? If I need more structure, please suggest specific training regimens.


2:
I ask for specific training regimens because I tried one for learning fetch already and, unfortunately, reinforced a wrong behavior. Specifically, the method starts by teaching "Take It", where you offer an object and the dog holds it in their mouth.

My dog will take items no problem, but he knows he gets a treat after holding it -- so he drops it immediately and looks up for his goodies.

I've tried not offering treats unless he holds the object longer, but he *never* tries to hold the object longer. Instead, if a treat doesn't arrive right away, he will quickly get frustrated and start refusing to "take it" at all.

How can I fix this?

Darth Walrus
Feb 13, 2012
:gas;


So we have a show cocker spaniel, and all things considered, I think we've been doing fairly well with her. Our neighbours just got a springer spaniel puppy, and as they're first-time dog owners who are very fond of our dog, they're looking to us for advice (which is slightly terrifying, because Chloe is also our first dog). Would I be missing out on anything important if I thought of a springer as just a bigger and (probably) more energetic cocker?

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006
TUBGIRL ENTHUSIAST



Thundershirt owners - have you ever had an issue leaving the shirt on for too long? My boy has major storm and separation anxiety so after 8 days of terrible weather his arrived... and now we're not experiencing storms of course. But he's taken to it really nicely, rides in the car better and was way more relaxed when I had the audacity to leave him alone at home for 10 minutes yesterday. So I'd rather him wear it as much as possible if he makes him comfortable and happy, but I don't want to reduce it's effects if that's something that can occur? I know you're supposed to give him some breaks from it during the day, is that enough?

Also he looks very smart in it, which is never a bad thing.

GoodBee
Apr 8, 2004




I've only had the thunder shirt rub a red spot when the little poo poo wiggled while I was putting it on and I didn't get the velcro lined up right. The only problem I had when I left it on her all day while I went to work was she chewed on it. Now it's got some holes in it and I don't use it often.

I do turn the TV for them when it's bad weather.

She's got really short, thin hair. I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006
TUBGIRL ENTHUSIAST



Ouch, hadn't thought about the velcro. I'll definitely double check I've got it right each time, good catch!

Protocol7
Jul 26, 2012

Cyber Hellcat is not amused


Got a diagnosis of cherry eye for my new pup. I had to go to the emergency vet since my usual vet is booked out until the 19th.

Anyone else ever have a pup with cherry eye? Iíve got prednisolone in the ophthalmic form to give him until I can see my vet, but should I try to get him booked with another vet to take care of it sooner?

It doesnít bother my pup at all as far as I can tell, he doesnít paw at it or anything. But I also donít want him to like, lose an eyeball when heís 3 months old.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

Protocol7 posted:

Got a diagnosis of cherry eye for my new pup. I had to go to the emergency vet since my usual vet is booked out until the 19th.

Anyone else ever have a pup with cherry eye? I’ve got prednisolone in the ophthalmic form to give him until I can see my vet, but should I try to get him booked with another vet to take care of it sooner?

It doesn’t bother my pup at all as far as I can tell, he doesn’t paw at it or anything. But I also don’t want him to like, lose an eyeball when he’s 3 months old.

Nah it's not anything super urgent. It is best to get it surgically corrected though.

Protocol7
Jul 26, 2012

Cyber Hellcat is not amused


Dixville posted:

Nah it's not anything super urgent. It is best to get it surgically corrected though.

We probably will, our regular vet does surgery so itís just a matter of waiting until we can see him (and then schedule the surgery.)

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


Any general tips on helping a dog chill during a thunderstorm? Apollo isn't whining or otherwise needing a thundershirt, but he is SUPER amped up and determined to cuddle with me / have zoomies / be otherwise freaked out.

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food court bailiff
Oct 2, 2007

fast n furious foodstuff



Soiled Meat

Hey all, Iíve had my puppy for nearly a year and sheís amazing and wonderful and sleeping all cuddled up on my legs right now. Just misclicked this thread and remembered how helpful it was early on, and wanted to thank everyone for posting good advice.

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