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Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.





Slow News Day posted:

Can you qualify the "as soon as you can" part? Should I be calling their emergency number?

If he's acting normal I'd probably wait until the morning if he was one of mine.

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Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


In my neighborhood I get a lot of newspaper/mail delivery guys on motor scooters. So lots of starts and stops and the starts are very sudden and loud. My one year old corgi is becoming increasingly reactive to them, to the point now where when one starts up she'll pull to the end of the leash barking aggressively. This is the only situation where she behaves this way. Does anyone know how I can desensitize her to this, or know what terms I should be looking for in training resources?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



Don't be timid about calling the vet and asking for post being attacked drugs next time something happens. They'll usually give at least antibiotics without an exam.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

Don't be timid about calling the vet and asking for post being attacked drugs next time something happens. They'll usually give at least antibiotics without an exam.

This shelter's vets aren't very reachable. Their medical reception desk is 9 AM to 7 PM, and getting connected to an operator always takes multiple attempts. I kinda hate it.

Swelling on the pup's throat is bigger and way more noticeable this morning. I guess I'll keep hammering their phone lines until someone finally picks up.

pmchem
Jan 21, 2010




what's the easiest / best customer experience for buying dog medicine online? not for a one-time prescription you'd get from a vet, but some recurring thing. I'm wondering if there's basically an Amazon for pet medicine. any ideas?

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 6 hours!


pmchem posted:

what's the easiest / best customer experience for buying dog medicine online? not for a one-time prescription you'd get from a vet, but some recurring thing. I'm wondering if there's basically an Amazon for pet medicine. any ideas?

Chewy does it but in my experience sucks for anything that isnít already packaged (flea & tick, heart guard). My vet has an online pharmacy through Covetrus and theyíve been good for the one maintenance med my hound takes.

prom candy
Dec 16, 2005

Only I may dance

Riatsala posted:

I have a problem, thread, and I need advice. My pup has been with us for 6 months now and he still makes a big fuss in the morning before we've let him out of his crate. We tend to sleep from 11 - 8 each night, but most days around 6:30 or so he'll start whining dramatically, slowly picking up volume until he starts yelping. I know he can hold his pee without trouble, I think he's either got separation anxiety or just wants breakfast, but we'd really like to get a full night's rest. What do? I put a curtain over his crate when we put him to bed; that stops the evening fussiness but has done nothing to abate the morning tantrum.

Edit: he's a year and a half old and his crate is maybe three feet from the bed, if that's a factor.

Our dog wakes us up between 6:30-7:30 every morning, one of us gets up, lets her outside, gives her breakfast, and then everyone goes back to sleep. I figure just because a dog (or person) can hold their pee doesn't mean they're having a good time doing it. Stella's never had a problem calming back down in the morning after she gets her stuff though.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


The shelter responded and said they are prescribing gabapentin and doxycycline for the swelling, and simply said "please let us know how he does while on the medications."

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



Dogs!

Mine got his ear ripped open and the cone did nothing to help, it actually made it more accessible to licking. When I called the vet they just said, "Well not much to do. Call again if it gets worse."

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

My pup, who is sixty pounds at eight months, just came off the cone. We had to switch to the inflatable inner tube type cone though because sixty pounds of energetic affection is brutal when it hits your ankle behind the leading edge of a hard plastic cone.

vs Dinosaurs
Mar 14, 2009


Puppy injured himself at the dog park; he was sprinting and bashed his leg against a tree, going down howling and stayed there for a couple of minutes while I comforted him. He was able to get up and walk, but with a limp, so I carried him to the car.

Nothing was sore to the touch on any of his limbs and there is/was no swelling, so I think he just strained something.

That was Sunday, and Iíve been keeping him at home with very short walks around the block a couple times a day. He is still favoring his other leg, but the limp is dramatically improving. How long before I should let him go back to the dog park for more running? He is going loving bonkers staying cooped up inside all the time.

vs Dinosaurs
Mar 14, 2009


Stringent posted:

In my neighborhood I get a lot of newspaper/mail delivery guys on motor scooters. So lots of starts and stops and the starts are very sudden and loud. My one year old corgi is becoming increasingly reactive to them, to the point now where when one starts up she'll pull to the end of the leash barking aggressively. This is the only situation where she behaves this way. Does anyone know how I can desensitize her to this, or know what terms I should be looking for in training resources?

Use a very high value treat to steal their attention while the traumatic thing is happening, and give the treat so they associate that thing with good thing. You may need to start out at a distance from it while it is happening and increase exposure to the thing over time.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


vs Dinosaurs posted:

Use a very high value treat to steal their attention while the traumatic thing is happening, and give the treat so they associate that thing with good thing. You may need to start out at a distance from it while it is happening and increase exposure to the thing over time.

I've been trying this, but it's gotten bad enough she won't turn to the treat. I actually came across something shortly after I posted that suggest tossing a bunch of treats around her and/or using a whistle with the treats so I'm going to give that a go.

Racing Stripe
Oct 22, 2003


My lil dog (not that little, 40 pounds) broke one of his toes playing too hard at day care and now his leg's in a cute little cast. It sucks. He's being a real trooper but he's obviously bummed out. Day care was his favorite thing, and now that's out for eight weeks, along with any walks longer than front of the house out to the back yard.

My GF and I work from home so we don't have to worry about getting someone to watch him (at least not now) but we don't really know what to do with him. He doesn't want to do much other than lie around, which is convenient and good for his recovery, but we're worried that his training and mental acuity will atrophy since we can't make him sit and heel and walk in circles and all that stuff that you can do with a fully mobile dog. He also seems pretty bummed out in general, and he's not as excited about treats as he used to be.

With all that in mind, what do you think we can do to engage with him and keep him entertained?

Racing Stripe
Oct 22, 2003


Stringent posted:

Does anyone know how I can desensitize her to this, or know what terms I should be looking for in training resources?

I think the terms you want to search for are "counter conditioning" and "desensitization." That's what I've been working on (a lot, with limited but possibly detectible success) with my dog who is reactive to dogs, people, sounds outside, butterflies flapping their wings two miles away, etc.

Sounds like for you it will be tricky since there isn't much presaging or buildup to the triggering event.

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


My terrier mix Parker generally refuses to eat anything, even if it's freaking people food. He may eventually get around to eating it or it may just sit there all night.

His weight is actually considered slightly above what it supposed to be according to vets, he isn't lethargic, doesn't have any issues with poop or vomiting, just doesn't really eat any food when it's offered.

We've tried kibbles and freshpet and other wet food. Little dude only consistently eats chicken.

luscious
Mar 8, 2005

Who can find a virtuous woman,
For her price is far above rubies.


Hi lovely people.

I'm desensitizing Sherlock to certain noises. Should I play these noises (super quietly) constantly, and raise the volume therein? Or should I play them intermittently? Does it matter?

cruft
Oct 25, 2007



luscious posted:

Hi lovely people.

I'm desensitizing Sherlock to certain noises. Should I play these noises (super quietly) constantly, and raise the volume therein? Or should I play them intermittently? Does it matter?

Just open the fire hose and play them constantly, after an hour or two the dog won't care.

I mean, it worked for me with work meeting invites. Seems like it'd work for a dog.

(I'm only 20% joking)

E: suddenly I think I realize how to get the dog to stop flipping out when an owl blinks outside at 2am. I think I'm willing to give up one night's sleep in order to secure the next 14 years.

cruft fucked around with this message at 19:49 on Apr 29, 2021

luscious
Mar 8, 2005

Who can find a virtuous woman,
For her price is far above rubies.


So it's been a slow process. A thing that was helpful for me was getting him to "alert" to the noises that he is scared of instead of flying immediately into crisis mode panic. It works about 50% of the time, but our redirect time is much faster now than before.

The other day he alerted to a motorcycle (or souped up Honda, who knows anymore...) and my dude. We live in downtown Toronto. I understand noises in the hallway, we have lived in a house for years and legit, sometimes the way that dog sounds come in from outside gets weird. BUT MUFFLERS??? I obviously go with it. I feel really bad for him because he's obviously intensely scared of these things.

I just want to be clear that this is only in the condo. Outside he's totally fine.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


Still going back and forth on whether I should adopt my foster ACD, and what type of lifestyle changes I would need to make.

Pros: He's super smart, playful and sweet. He has been with me for 8 months now and we've learned each other's habits, likes and dislikes. I live in a house with a fenced backyard, and work from home, so he's able to get a lot of exercise. We have settled into a routine and I think he loves it here.

Cons: I'm single and live by myself, so there is no one else to share the responsibility with. Now that I'm vaccinated I'd love to be able to take him to coffee shops with me, and hike on trails together, go swimming, etc. but he's leash reactive and not super good with other dogs so I don't know if that would be possible. I also travel internationally about once a year (visiting parents overseas) and don't know of anyone who would be able to dog sit for a week or two at a time, which means I would have to board him. Similar concerns with recreational activities. I used to do a lot of rock climbing and will be getting back into it, and that means day-long trips out to the wilderness. I can't leave him at home for an entire day though, as he would go nuts.

Reading what I wrote above, I guess most of the cons are logistics related? I don't know. It's a long-term commitment and I want to approach it logically rather than emotionally.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.





Slow News Day posted:

Still going back and forth on whether I should adopt my foster ACD, and what type of lifestyle changes I would need to make.

The dog you posted before does not appear to be an ACD, just from the neck picture, FYI. Not that it really matters, it will just confuse some people if you tell them you're bringing an ACD and show up with a brindle and white mix. I hope his puncture is all healed up!

My reactive dog wouldn't be able to handle coffee shops but we have gone on many hikes without incident. I know all the low-traffic trails in my area and he can be managed if we come across other dogs on the path. Boarding I have not risked with him, but if it's a concern maybe you can do a test run? See what the highly recommended boarding places near you are and just give him an overnight to see how he does? If he doesn't handle it well that's good info for you or for future adopters depending on what you decide. If he's dog reactive a daycare probably won't work out but you can see if there are dog walkers willing to give him a try.



Friendly reminder to be careful with hard dog chews. If you can dig your fingernail in the chew and make an impression, it's safe. If you can whack your knee with it, and it doesn't hurt, it's okay. If not there's a dental risk, especially for aggressive chewers. The old man got one of the puppy's harder chews and now needs $500-700 worth of dental work (for a second time), while I freak out about putting a 13 year old dog under. If it hurts to drop on my foot it's getting thrown away now.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


Instant Jellyfish posted:

The dog you posted before does not appear to be an ACD, just from the neck picture, FYI. Not that it really matters, it will just confuse some people if you tell them you're bringing an ACD and show up with a brindle and white mix. I hope his puncture is all healed up!

Thanks. It's this guy: https://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/apa-a-69440

The page says "looks like: cattle dog" but I guess that doesn't necessarily mean ACD.

His wounds seem to be healing. No more swelling since he started his antibiotics regimen last week.

quote:

My reactive dog wouldn't be able to handle coffee shops but we have gone on many hikes without incident. I know all the low-traffic trails in my area and he can be managed if we come across other dogs on the path. Boarding I have not risked with him, but if it's a concern maybe you can do a test run? See what the highly recommended boarding places near you are and just give him an overnight to see how he does? If he doesn't handle it well that's good info for you or for future adopters depending on what you decide. If he's dog reactive a daycare probably won't work out but you can see if there are dog walkers willing to give him a try.

Well, the issue is that I'm just the foster parent, and the shelter won't let me try boarding him to test it out, probably due to potential liability if something goes wrong. So I have no way of finding out whether it will work or not, and would be going into it blind if I decided to adopt him.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.





Oh goodness, he's adorable

Have you talked to the shelter folks about your concerns? Do they have a behavior person helping you out? You're doing such a good thing fostering him and you're clearly super attached to each other but it seems like you could use more support and they should be providing that. Your concerns are definitely valid and good things to think about. It just comes down to whether you think they're concerns you can get past.

You said you wanted to be logical but pets aren't logical. If you want to make it work because you love that dog I'm sure you can. You can give up on your mental vision of what your ideal dog owning experience would be and work on making what you have be as good as it can be. If you think he's going to impact all of the things you really enjoy doing and that's going to make you resentful maybe it's not meant to be. Neither is right or wrong, it's just going to take some careful consideration.

vs Dinosaurs
Mar 14, 2009


Could you adopt him and then test things out with a contingency to return him if it doesnít work out with boarding? Local shelters here have this policy.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


Jesus christ, as I was posting something he reached up on the kitchen counter and got a hold of some fish oil pills that the shelter vet had prescribed for another injury. Ate a bunch before I caught it.

Dogs, man.

cruft
Oct 25, 2007



Slow News Day posted:

Jesus christ, as I was posting something he reached up on the kitchen counter and got a hold of some fish oil pills that the shelter vet had prescribed for another injury. Ate a bunch before I caught it.

Dogs, man.

In fairness, that poo poo is delicious.

Slow News Day
Jul 4, 2007


It's really my fault for leaving it on the counter, but I had just given him some with his dinner, then my phone rang and I ran over to the other room to answer it. Within 30 seconds I heard some rustling and ran back to the kitchen and caught him!

NO. Bad dog. Bad. Dog. Go to your bed now please, thank you.

Goodpancakes
May 18, 2004

Redlining my shit posting machine



So I've had a rescue dog for about 6 months and he was showing some fear and nipping issues. We ended up getting a trainer and working on some of this stuff. Hes fine outside of the house in almost every circumstance. If i'm not yanking on his leash he walks by people and dogs, often incredibly close, but doesn't react most of the time. In the apartment complex and in the apartment itself he has taken to guarding a lot. Nipping at some postal workers and nipping the trainer. He showed a lot of bite inhibition but obviously this was a problem that needed to be worked on. Tonight, I had a rare visit from my father, and the dog was obviously uncomfortable and fearful of my father. I needed to be on him much more then I was and ultimately this was my mistake. He bit my father in the leg. On that common bite scale its probably a 3. This is a big problem and I'm at a bit of a loss of what to do. He'll likely need much more training, and to wear a muzzle a lot. Is this a situation where I give up this dog I have bonded to? Its been a lovely night and I don't know where and how to start with this. I'm not sure I can trust this dog again.

ImplicitAssembler
Jan 24, 2013



vs Dinosaurs posted:

Puppy injured himself at the dog park; he was sprinting and bashed his leg against a tree, going down howling and stayed there for a couple of minutes while I comforted him. He was able to get up and walk, but with a limp, so I carried him to the car.

Nothing was sore to the touch on any of his limbs and there is/was no swelling, so I think he just strained something.

That was Sunday, and Iíve been keeping him at home with very short walks around the block a couple times a day. He is still favoring his other leg, but the limp is dramatically improving. How long before I should let him go back to the dog park for more running? He is going loving bonkers staying cooped up inside all the time.

At least 2 weeks. (And yeah, it sucks)

vs Dinosaurs
Mar 14, 2009


Yeah, I took him to the park yesterday to play and while he didnít reinjure it, it felt too soon to be back there.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Goodpancakes posted:

So I've had a rescue dog for about 6 months and he was showing some fear and nipping issues. We ended up getting a trainer and working on some of this stuff. Hes fine outside of the house in almost every circumstance. If i'm not yanking on his leash he walks by people and dogs, often incredibly close, but doesn't react most of the time. In the apartment complex and in the apartment itself he has taken to guarding a lot. Nipping at some postal workers and nipping the trainer. He showed a lot of bite inhibition but obviously this was a problem that needed to be worked on. Tonight, I had a rare visit from my father, and the dog was obviously uncomfortable and fearful of my father. I needed to be on him much more then I was and ultimately this was my mistake. He bit my father in the leg. On that common bite scale its probably a 3. This is a big problem and I'm at a bit of a loss of what to do. He'll likely need much more training, and to wear a muzzle a lot. Is this a situation where I give up this dog I have bonded to? Its been a lovely night and I don't know where and how to start with this. I'm not sure I can trust this dog again.

This sucks, I sympathize. I can't fault your analysis either. Ultimately it's your call, but it's a very hard call to have to make.

luscious
Mar 8, 2005

Who can find a virtuous woman,
For her price is far above rubies.


Instant Jellyfish posted:

Friendly reminder to be careful with hard dog chews. If you can dig your fingernail in the chew and make an impression, it's safe. If you can whack your knee with it, and it doesn't hurt, it's okay. If not there's a dental risk, especially for aggressive chewers.

I really debated about posting this when it happened but I'm going to share bc gently caress it.

LEARN DOG CPR AND HEIMLICH.

Sherlock loved bully sticks and beef tendons. A few weeks ago he choked on one and I had to give him the dog Heimlich, which I learned on a whim a few years ago.

There are some great videos for small dogs and large dogs and I'm so thankful that I knew what to do in advance.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.





Goodpancakes posted:

So I've had a rescue dog for about 6 months and he was showing some fear and nipping issues. We ended up getting a trainer and working on some of this stuff. Hes fine outside of the house in almost every circumstance. If i'm not yanking on his leash he walks by people and dogs, often incredibly close, but doesn't react most of the time. In the apartment complex and in the apartment itself he has taken to guarding a lot. Nipping at some postal workers and nipping the trainer. He showed a lot of bite inhibition but obviously this was a problem that needed to be worked on. Tonight, I had a rare visit from my father, and the dog was obviously uncomfortable and fearful of my father. I needed to be on him much more then I was and ultimately this was my mistake. He bit my father in the leg. On that common bite scale its probably a 3. This is a big problem and I'm at a bit of a loss of what to do. He'll likely need much more training, and to wear a muzzle a lot. Is this a situation where I give up this dog I have bonded to? Its been a lovely night and I don't know where and how to start with this. I'm not sure I can trust this dog again.

My reactive dog is much worse in my home than in public and I have been in that situation before. He bit my grandma in the face and it was absolutely horrifying (it was a shallow nip and she was fine) It sucks really bad and it's scary to see but remember that he was just being a dog. He is no better or worse than he was before. He was in a situation that scared him and he reacted in a way that he thought he needed to. Now you have better information about what to do to help him.

It sounds like you could use the help of a good veterinary behaviorist to see if he could benefit from medication (my dog is on zoloft and it has made a huge difference in his life) and they may have more management tips that you haven't thought of. A lot of them are doing telemedicine appointments now but here's a good place to start looking.

For my dog he just gets put away anytime anyone is at my house. He's at the point where he automatically goes to my bedroom as soon as he hears someone knock on the door and is happy to snooze there the entire time. Many of my friends have never and will never meet him, but he's safe and they're safe and that's what matters. I could probably train him to be ok with strangers at this point but if I want to have a relaxing time with my friends it's a lot easier to just manage the situation.

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Gobi still has Giardia at 6 months, after 2 rounds of antibiotics. He still has pretty soft stool oftentimes, but otherwise is very high energy.

He will need another test at 9 months to see if itís cleared up. If not, Iím thinking maybe I just wait til his adult immune system kicks in and beats it? If three rounds of antibiotics donít do anything I doubt a 4th will.

ImplicitAssembler
Jan 24, 2013



Pureed pumpkin and probiotics can go a long way firming things up

cruft
Oct 25, 2007



ImplicitAssembler posted:

Pureed pumpkin and probiotics can go a long way firming things up

Are you saying that pureed pumpkin plus probiotics produces practically perfect puppy poop?

Yorkshire Pudding
Nov 24, 2006





Iíve been giving him probiotics for like 2 months, and I recently switched over to Acana pumpkin something for puppies and juniors. Still getting quite a bit of soft stool.

kirbysuperstar
Nov 11, 2012





I've moved in with my mum and taken Wren with me. It's been..a week and a half now and while he's mostly acclimatizing to her, her partner and their dog well enough, his intense separation anxiety and refusal to go outside and instead piss/poo poo in her brand new kitchen is doing my head in. Gonna have to start taking him outside on the hour, staying with him there to see if he goes and giving him a treat if he does I guess.

The separation, uhhh..yeah I dunno there. If I even go in the bathroom he whimpers and cries.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


We battled giardia for a year before moving to a house with a yard and not going to dog parks. We probably did 4 rounds of tests and meds over that time before we felt like it was finally under control.

We also switched to a relatively clean dog food (limited ingredient bison and sweet potato) and supplement daily with some rehydrated pumpkin or carrot pellets we buy on amazon. Dogs poop is much firmer. Occasional soft poops are going to happen based on treats, stress, allergies and other factors.

The biggest thing we struggled with was long bouts of soft poops backed up and infected his anal glands. Hard poops naturally express them but soft poops don't so they were awful during that time and had to be expressed and given medication when they got infected.

Giardia is a bitch.

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MadFriarAvelyn
Sep 25, 2007



Verman posted:

Giardia is a bitch.

Preach it. Took Teddi until he was a year old to handle the constant reinfections well. So glad we moved out of that area.

Psyllium powder is another option for firming up poops for a giardia prone puppy. You can buy em in bags for cheap on Amazon. Works great with a teaspoon or so in each of their meals.

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