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HONG KONG SLUMLORD
Apr 21, 2003


Pillbug

coolskillrex remix posted:

PC is typically thought of as being underpowered, dont think its truly dual action. Its impossible to damage your paint with it as a result.

However if youre not an idiot and dont have razor thin paint (i think infiniti is notorious for that), then even with a GG you can go to town and unless you just hold the thing in place for 10 seconds can you actually burn through the paint.

I have a PC, i probably wish i had just bought a meguiars/griot/whatever because i imagine i could do the job faster AND get more of the swirls out.

Here's a question from a retard: if I'm looking to basically do light polishing (removing light-to-medium swirls and scratches, barely perceptible when you run your fingernail across) as well as the usual waxing/buffing thing, would the GG unit still be a good choice? Or is that way too much power for this sort of thing?

My dad just bought a used car with some ugly scratches in it (dealership made up a bunch of excuses as to why they wouldn't repair it but whatever) and another person in my family's looking to sell his Wrangler that's seen its fair share of bushes. I'm trying to find a "one size fits all" unit but I'm not sure if that's possible at this point.

I was actually considering that Flex XC 3401 thing since everyone claims it has massive balls and corrective ability compared to the other DAs out there (although more expensive, but as someone on their forum correctly put it "buy one, cry once") but I can't find any information about waxing with the thing. I imagine it's probably an answer of "DON'T EVEN loving TRY IT YOU IDIOT" but since nobody has made a forum post directly addressing it and I'm ignorant of these things I was hoping someone here would have some input.

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HONG KONG SLUMLORD
Apr 21, 2003


Pillbug

Stultus posted:

I have the PC7424 as well as the Flex. The Flex is a great polisher and will correct any defects in the paint quicker than a PC, but there if you have no prior experience with machine buffing than it would definitely be wiser to pick up the PC, especially if the defects are fairly light.


You could however learn on the Flex, just make sure you look up the proper technique on how to use it before going to the paint with it. It's a powerful machine and you can run the risk of damaging your clear coat if used improperly. I use the Flex almost all the time now because of how much quicker it corrects paint, but I do use the PC with 4" pads in tighter areas of the car. So if you want to buy the PC and get your technique down and then buy the Flex later, you won't have to worry about your PC being useless.

Thanks for the advice. I'll place an order for the PC tonight, and I think I'll go through that Autogeek site since they have a ton of good information and free tutorials. I think I'll go for one of their multi-pad kits with the cutting and waxing pads and see how good I can get before I go with anything more powerful.

...and if it goes wrong I'll be posting a thread asking for reputable local painters.

HONG KONG SLUMLORD
Apr 21, 2003


Pillbug

Well per everyone's advice here I ended up buying the Porter Cable 7424XP and all I have to say is GODDAMN I LOVE THIS TOOL.

I bought it from Autogeek with the Lake Country orange, white, black and blue pads. I scored some of the Meguiars Mirror Glaze 105 and 205, along with all the other suggested detailing stuff.

After clay barring the entire Fit (gently caress clay barring, worst job ever) I got to the polishing aspect. I used the 205 on the orange pad and watched the scratches on the Fit's side just disappear. The PC took a little while getting used to compared to the orbital buffers I currently own, but after I got used to the right amount of pressure and had the pad spinning consistently in a circle it really started kicking some major rear end in the scratch department.

Then I decided to try to knock some nasty battle scars off my brother's Wrangler. I went down to the 105 on the orange pad and took it to the nasty spots. After about 10 minutes of buffing I was able to knock down every. goddamned. scratch. on the hood of the Jeep. Some of these were pretty healthy, and even with the curvature of the hood and all of about 3 hours of practice with the PC I was able to knock it all down without damaging the paint at all.

I'm really kicking myself in the rear end right now for not taking before/after pictures, but to be honest I never imagined in my wildest dreams that this thing would do it. It did.

I really love this thing, if you can't tell already. If you are at all serious about making your car look nice, don't buy an orbital buffer. Spend the extra $100 and get the dual-action. Hell, get any dual action. I, a bona-fide self-admitted idiot incapable of operating a can of spray paint properly can make a car look like loving new. The bonus is that you have already paid for the tool when you have pulled the light scratches out of the side of your car. Except now you own a kick-rear end tool.

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