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Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


So here is a broad overview of hunting that should answer at least a few basic questions for anyone interesting in getting up way too early, sitting in the cold/rain and coming home exhausted with a bigger gear to buy list than when you started the day. This write up will focus on hunting in the U.S. primarily, but I know there are some goons chasing moose in Europe and goats in New Zealand.

Types of Game
Hunting is broken down into 2 general categories: Big game and small game. Deer, Elk, Bears, Moose, Goats, Turkey and Caribou fall into the category of big game and you are generally given a tag for a specific animal such as 1 antlered deer or 1 antlerless deer. Draws for tags are far more common for big game and rules tend to be stricter, generally if it has hooves its considered big game. Small game would be things like rabbits, squirrels, doves, ducks, pheasants, quail and grouse. Small game tags are usually pretty cheap and easy to get and there are generally daily limits as opposed to a specific tag. Small game is the best place for any hunter to start. Small game teaches you the fundamentals of hunting on a smaller scale, it is generally more forgiving and rewarding with less work.


Big Game


Small Game


Getting Started
Now to the business of getting into hunting, the first and most important piece of advice I can give is to FIND SOMEONE WHO ALREADY DOES IT to learn from. Not to say that you canít get into the sport without guidance, it just REALLY makes it harder. Find a friend, a co-worker, a relative or a fellow goon that can teach you the ropes, doing this will save you years of frustration and provide a good chance that you will continue the sport in the future. Once you have someone to help you out, or at least understand the perils of learning to hunt solo you will either need to take a hunter safety course or get an apprentice hunting license. Most places now require hunter safety for most situations and there really isnít a good reason not to take a hunter safety class. Most of the classes are part safety and part introduction to hunting and given the right instructor can be unbelievably useful. Bad hunter safety courses are just like any other bad gun class, loaded with political bias and lacking for good information. A lot of states now offer 1 or 2 year apprentice hunting licenses that allow someone to try hunting without committing to a weekend long class as long as they hunt with someone that has a valid hunter safety. Apprentice licenses are great because a lot of people donít think about taking a class until a hunting season has started and the classes are all over/full.

Licenses
Now that you have your hunter safety, you are going to need licenses for your given state, possibly a zone of a state and possibly a federal stamp. Consult your local Conservation/Fish and Wildlife/Department of natural resources because this varies a lot by area. In general you will spend $20 or so for each hunting license/tag if you are a resident of a state and $100-$400+ for nonresident licenses and tags. When I lived in Missouri I could buy a small game hunting permit, migratory bird permit, duck stamp, turkey tags and deer tags for an entire year for around $100 total. Now out of state deer tags are around $225 for rifle hunting another $200 or so for archery tags or spring turkey tags. Moral of the story: hunt in state unless you have really good/free private property to hunt elsewhere. Full time college students living out of state should look into hunting where they go to school as most states now consider full time student to be residents.



Where to hunt:
You are either going to hunt on private or public land. Private land is awesome, but it requires knowing people, being lucky, persistent or forking over ungodly amounts of money for leases. Land leases in the Midwest usually run $5-$40/acre per year so unless you have a group of people to go in with, leases arenít normally affordable. Going door to door asking farms for permission to hunt is a dying yet time honored tradition for hunting, itís worth a try because they can only say no. Private land affords control over your environment, less pressure on animals and generally better odds. Public land varies wildly from tightly controlled draw based, developed areas to Wild West free for allís where no rules outside of state regulations apply. I highly recommend managed and draw based public areas as they afford good opportunities if you can get in. These areas have draws that occur day of or months in advance depending on the area. Put in for as many of these as you can, they are the poor manís way to be successful when hunting and I know plenty of duck club members that will leave their heated blind for a coveted public draw. The best way to hunt restricted public areas is during the week when most people are working. Public hunting is about 1 thing, getting away from other hunters. This means going in early, going further off the beaten path into hard to reach areas because most hunters rarely stray more than a ľ mile from the road. Lots of preseason scouting is the only way to hunt public land as pressure makes animals leave an area or at least restrict their movement heavily. Google Earth and topographical maps are a great way to pinpoint good pieces of public land before you drive many hours to see them.


What do I need to hunt?
This varies by species and can be as simple as a rifle and knife and can be as complicated as duck hunting. Generally you need your chosen weapon, appropriate clothing, licenses, a blind or stand and possibly decoys/calls/attractants. You need good binoculars for almost any type of hunting, they will help you see animals and more importantly scout distant areas for future use. Good boots will also go a long way towards comfort in the field; comfort always equals more time spent in the field and more opportunities to be successful.



What to hunt: A brief breakdown of common species to hunt and expectations.

Deer: Cheap to hunt, little gear required, generally the easiest big game to hunt if you are only looking to shoot something. It gets a bit harder if you are hunting big deer or using a bow. The only big game I would consider hunting without trying hunting small game.





Squirrels/Rabbits: abundant, common and probably the best starting point for new hunters. Walk around in the woods with a .22 or shotgun and try to scare something up to shoot.

Turkeys: Hardest thing I have hunted, really good eyesight and a 40 yard kill range with a shotgun make them a big challenge. It doesnít require a lot of gear, but is not good for beginners without guidance.



Ducks/Geese: Gear intensive, generally the most expensive way to shoot 3 lbs of meat that I know of without leaving the country. Usually requires waders, decoys, calls, boats and none of that gear is cheap. Couple expense with migrations, lots of miles on the road and the problems brought on by water and ice and you have a distinct subspecies of hunter.





Pheasants/Quail/Grouse: Walk around in the woods being all classy behind your highly trained dog and shoot what gets up. The poor manís alternative is to walk through thick brush and hope something gets up to shoot. Light on gear, this is the only hunting where dogs really matter. If you consider dogs to be a hunting gear, it is expensive.

Doves: Cheap wing shooting fun during the warm part of the year, find a sunflower field and bring a case of shells. Probably the best introduction to wing shooting, make sure to practice at the sporting clay range first.



Hogs: Someone who lives in the south can explain this better than me; usually you just use dogs or hunt over bait. There are basically no rules to hog hunting as they are a nuisance.

Varmints: Coyotes, foxes, prairie dogs and all sorts of random fur bearers that are hunted for pelts rather than meat. Get a superfast .22 caliber centerfire rifle and an electronic caller, shoot one animal then realize how disgusting they are and go home.

Camouflage
Camouflage is commonly associated with hunting and I can tell you that use of shadows is way more important than having pictures of leaves screen printed on a shirt. That said, I still have a wide variety of camo for different hunting because what works well in a tree stand in November isnít going to be nearly as good in a duck blind or during spring turkey season. Iím not going to get into the specifics of camo fanboyism or why some people think multicam is far superior to commercial stuff. I will say that I believe Mossy Oak Break-up to be the best multipurpose commercial camouflage and I will always love Mossy Oak Treestand. Most deer hunting and a lot of small game require blaze orange clothing, this is never a bad idea even if itís not required and you are on public land.



Guns and ammo
We can get into the specifics of what it takes to kill specific animals, but here is a rundown of common guns/game

Deer: Centerfire rifle with 900 ft-lbs of energy, some states require a minimum bullet diameter so .223 isnít legal everywhere, Soft point or ballistic tip bullets. Commonly .243, 30-06, 30-30, 270, 7.62x39, 308

Turkeys: 10/12/20 gauge shotgun #4-6 shot and extra-full choke

Squirrels: .22lr with hollowpoints or any shotgun with 6 shot and a modified choke

Ducks: 10/12/20 gauge #2-6 shot with a modified or improved cylinder choke, nontoxic only.

Elk: Centerfire rifle with 1500 ft-lbs energy, softpoint ammo. 270, 30-06, 300 magnums

Moose: Centerfire rifle with 2100 ft-lbs energy, softpoint ammo. 30-06, 300 magnums, 338

Doves/Quail: shotgun with 7 shot and improved cylinder choke

Geese: 10/12 gauge with BB-#2 shot and modified or full choke, non toxic only

What to do now, I shot something I think I might have hit it?
Well assuming you made a good shot and reasonable range and hit the animal in the vital areas you are in luck. With most small game, a good hit will instantly kill the animal you shot and it will fold within sight. Some larger animals like deer like to run a while after you shoot them. In general the best thing to do is to watch listen and wait to figure out what just happened. With birds and small game, mark where you think the animal landed and go right to it, have your buddies stay back and spot where they think it landed and triangulate where your dinner is at. Do not loose focus or look away, mark the spot you think the animal landed and work you way out in circles to find it. With bigger game, always wait a few minutes for an animal to expire, as a poorly hit animal will not go far and will often double back to where it was hit. Giving a questionably hit deer overnight to bleed out is common practice if the weather is cool enough. Look for blood trails, try to recover your arrow if using a bow and mark your trail with high visibility tape. Being persistent is key when finding downed animals, and using all your senses are required. Once you have found the animal field dressing it may be necessary, for mammals this usually requires making a cut from the base of the neck to the anus and removing all of the intestines and organs inside of the rib cage. You may have to cut the animal into quarters to pack it out under extreme circumstances. Birds don't usually need to be field dressed, but if you do you have to leave an intact wing to show the species or sex for transport purposes.



I intend to continue with more specific posts about individual species, feel free to add your own or correct me on anything.

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Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Saved for future stuff

Evil_Urna
Aug 15, 2004


Flatland Crusoe posted:


Turkeys: 10/12/20 gauge shotgun #4-6 shot and extra-full choke

Ducks: 10/12/20 gauge #2-6 shot with a modified or improved cylinder choke, nontoxic only.

[

You would need to be the Carlos Hathock of shotguns to be able to reliability take down turkeys and ducks with a 20 gauge.

gimpsuitjones
Mar 27, 2007

What are you lookin at...

20 gauge is becoming very popular in NZ and is seemingly very effective. Steel shot is legally required for 12g but you can still use lead in 20g.

Mad Dragon
Feb 29, 2004



Flatland Crusoe posted:

Deer: Centerfire rifle with 900 ft-lbs of energy, some states require a minimum bullet diameter so .223 isnít legal everywhere, Soft point or ballistic tip bullets. Commonly .243, 30-06, 30-30, 270, 7.62x39, 308

In Maryland, rifles used for deer and bear hunting must use ammunition developing a muzzle energy of at least 1,200 foot pounds. There are a few .223 loads that can produce that kind of energy, so it's a viable deer caliber.

compton ass terry
Nov 20, 2006

Do you know where I'm from?

If anyone can expand on boar hunting I would appreciate it. I'm planning on going to some private land this summer (in Texas with some friends. I've only shot .22s and I would need to buy a rifle as well. I am on a college budget but I don't mind spending the money if necessary. Would a mosin get the job done?

Herr Tog
Jun 18, 2011




Grimey Drawer

I for one would hunt with a OH gently caress THE RUSSIANS k98 before I trust an OH poo poo THE GERMANS Mosin.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


I wouldn't do it if for nothing else because of that stupid safety on the Mosin. You'd have to carry it with an empty chamber or risk hurting your fingers trying to activate and deactivate the safety. And don't even think about trying to slowly decock it on a live round, really bad idea.

Giant Isopod
Jan 30, 2010

Bathynomus giganteus

Yams Fan

Herr Tog posted:

I for one would hunt with a OH gently caress THE RUSSIANS k98 before I trust an OH poo poo THE GERMANS Mosin.

Your username makes you sound unbiased and trustworthy on that subject!

I too am interested in hog hunting! I was just talking to a friend about maybe trying to get into that. I don't have any guns in the appropriate caliber (except a mosin, oddly enough, but I don't think it would be too fun lugging that around with my Tactical Rapid Fire 2"x4" Bolt Activator). I do, however, have an AR-15 and it seems like the intermediate calibers - 6.5, 6.8, 300 aac - are fairly common for hogs, and that might be a viable relatively cheap solution?

compton ass terry
Nov 20, 2006

Do you know where I'm from?

Isn't Mauser ammo starting to dry up? Wouldn't it make more sense to buy a used .30-06?

Giant Isopod
Jan 30, 2010

Bathynomus giganteus

Yams Fan

compton rear end terry posted:

Isn't Mauser ammo starting to dry up? Wouldn't it make more sense to buy a used .30-06?

I'd think you'd want to be using hunting ammo and not surplus anyway

brac2009
Apr 15, 2010


Mosins are great for hogs. I use my OH gently caress GERMANS M91/30 (41 Izzy) for it sometimes. Oddly enough, I have been using my OH gently caress RUSSIANS k98 (44 ce) for it as of late. Either one is fine. I just always carry a backup gun. Those things can be pretty freaking mean.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Yes, you'll need some kind of a soft point or hollow point. Surplus is all FMJ and not good for hunting and often illegal for hunting.

If you can find a good used '06 or .308 that'd be a great choice as you could get hunting ammo at any Wal-Mart. 8mm hunting ammo you might have to order online.

Parts Kit fucked around with this message at 04:36 on Mar 27, 2012

Not Nipsy Russell
Oct 6, 2004

Failure is always an option.


I know that soft-point .308 is eye opening when used against soft targets like cabbages and melons. I've never shot anything living, though...

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Another great option would be a .30-30. They should be pretty plentiful, ammo is everywhere, and lever guns are a hoot at the range.

Not Nipsy Russell posted:

I know that soft-point .308 is eye opening when used against soft targets like cabbages and melons. I've never shot anything living, though...
I've shot a few deer, one with a Hakim, one with a compound bow, and one with a .243. I'm not 100% satisfied with how quickly bows kill, but the 8mm and .243 did the job pretty quick with a lung shot. If I remember right .243 is approximately 1900-2000 ft-lbs and .308 runs closer to 2600-2700 ft-lbs. '06 is a bit more than .308, significant but not as drastic as the difference between 243 and 308.

I'm not personally big on hunting though, everything up to the point the animal is hit is ok, like the hiking and stuff, but I always feel like such a poo poo as I see a deer dying. (ed: sorry, I didn't mean to editorialize there, so I'll leave it at that instead of derailing.) It's surprisingly not gory until the cleaning/gutting part though. Ugh, that stuff makes me glad that professional deer processors exist.

Parts Kit fucked around with this message at 05:27 on Mar 27, 2012

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


But small game is so cute

And taste so good!

Herr Tog
Jun 18, 2011




Grimey Drawer

Giant Isopod posted:

Your username makes you sound unbiased and trustworthy on that subject!

Thank you friend for your kind words~! I must be honest as I never imagined I would discuss matters of mutations with an Isopod regardless of it's size.

I am happy to hear other people have tried and supposedly succeeded in hunting with their OH gently caress OUR OLD ALLIES guns. I did not know Steel core would be illegal. What is a good soft point for 8mil?

This thread is awesome

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


I'm probably going to go with S&B when I get something for my Hakim and M48A next time, but it's not cheap at about $1 a shot.

ammunitiontogo has it on sale at the moment:
http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/produ...products_id/589
ed: I think Cabela's sometimes stocks it in 200 round packs so maybe you could split one with someone and save a bit?

Could be worse though.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/63...itzer-box-of-20


Nosler Partitions are supposed to be incredibly effective hunting ammo, though I can't currently justify the price.

Parts Kit fucked around with this message at 06:48 on Mar 27, 2012

Advent Horizon
Jan 17, 2003

I love Alaska. The only people Natives beat are their wives.

The grouse should start hooting soon and I can't wait to go for them.

The Spruce Grouse has an interesting mating habit that gives us a spring hunt: the males hoot to call the females in. All you have to do is find some treed territory a goat wouldn't trod, listen for the hoot, and follow that noise to the base of a giant tree on top of a mountain right as the bird shuts up and starts blending in. It's so easy!

I'm lucky in that I get off work at 3:30pm so that gives several hours of daylight to wear myself out.

Oh, and in Alaska you can hunt for big game with any gun so long as it isn't rimfire. Waterfowl requires a shotgun of no larger than 10 gauge.

All big game rules have exceptions if the animals are swimming; shooting a caribou in the back of the head with a .22 pistol while it's swimming is considered the best way to get one.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Almost forgot one really important thing when hunting with surplus stuff -- mag limits. With a bolt gun you're probably fine since modern bolt guns usually top out around 5 rounds like most military stuff, but if you take something like a Garand, SVT40, Hakim, or whatever you need to double check both your state's general mag limit and also specifically look for any additional limits in the section specifically for whatever species you're hunting. Probably a good idea to check it anyways for a bolt gun just in case. I've heard of people using Lego blocks to cut down capacity in SKS mags for hogs so you don't have to necessarily send a poo poo ton of cash to the one guy on the internet that makes tiny replacement mags for obscure surplus.

In AL I think it's a free for all for varmints (woo beta-c's for coyotes) but specifically for deer there is a 10 round limit, and it may only be applicable on public land. Been a while since I checked, once I cofirmed the Hakim/SVT40 were kosher wherever in AL I kinda forgot the specifics.

NFA stuff may also be off limits. Supressors and anything with a full auto option are definitely not kosher in AL.

Tubgirl Cosplay
Jan 10, 2011

by Ion Helmet


Parts Kit posted:

I wouldn't do it if for nothing else because of that stupid safety on the Mosin. You'd have to carry it with an empty chamber or risk hurting your fingers trying to activate and deactivate the safety. And don't even think about trying to slowly decock it on a live round, really bad idea.

The safety's less an issue than them weighing a billion pounds, depending where and who you are leave the chamber unloaded or if just keep finger off the trigger and rifle pointed at the ground

OTOH one of the guys I normally go hunting with has a history of buttstroking his deer to death so maybe the weight's an advantage.

SeamusMcPhisticuffs
Aug 2, 2006

republicans.bmp


Small game hunting really is fun. If you want to get into hunting, it's definitely a great start. The bigger the game gets, the less fun it becomes once you actually shoot something. If moose meat wasn't so tasty, nobody would hunt the fuckers. Trucking multiple 100+ lb loads of meat through forest and swamp gets old quick.

I like to go drive old logging roads looking/listening for grouse.

Dr. Strangler
Jul 21, 2009

I 'snapped' and killed a bird and its baby purely because their chirping annoyed me. I got a buzz out of killing them both with one shot.

In other words, I have the mind of a serial killer.

Tubgirl Cosplay posted:

OTOH one of the guys I normally go hunting with has a history of buttstroking his deer to death so maybe the weight's an advantage.

I made the mistake of going on a couple hunting/camping trips with a redneck friend of mine who just straight up hates animals. Like, all animals, for no reason.

We hadn't even gotten where we were going before he got out of his truck on a county road to punt a opossum over the guardrails. It only went downhill from there (the trip, not the opossum).

Giant Isopod
Jan 30, 2010

Bathynomus giganteus

Yams Fan

Tubgirl Cosplay posted:

OTOH one of the guys I normally go hunting with has a history of buttstroking his deer to death so maybe the weight's an advantage.

It's like he doesn't even know what the bayonet is for

kwantam
Mar 25, 2008

-=kwantam


Giant Isopod posted:

Your username makes you sound unbiased and trustworthy on that subject!

I too am interested in hog hunting! I was just talking to a friend about maybe trying to get into that. I don't have any guns in the appropriate caliber (except a mosin, oddly enough, but I don't think it would be too fun lugging that around with my Tactical Rapid Fire 2"x4" Bolt Activator). I do, however, have an AR-15 and it seems like the intermediate calibers - 6.5, 6.8, 300 aac - are fairly common for hogs, and that might be a viable relatively cheap solution?

.223 is absolutely sufficient for hogs if you can place your shots well. If you can't place your shots well, you shouldn't be hunting anyway.

A Mosin would be fine but hogs are usually encountered in packs. If you want to take more than one at once (i.e., if you're trying to actually get rid of hogs and not just get some meat), you'll want something that has a reasonable capacity and is semiautomatic.

Texas has no magazine limits and no limit on caliber for hunting except that you're not allowed to use rimfires for anything reasonably big (e.g., deer). All federal regulations (mostly regarding waterfowl) also apply.

Nosler partitions are indeed good bullets, but they're unnecessary for a lot of game. If you're hunting elk or moose you need to worry about mass retention so bullets like Accubonds, Partitions, or Interbonds are a good idea. For deer and hogs, normal cup and core soft points are totally acceptable.

I'm going to give Federal Fusion factory loads a try later today. They're not loaded particularly hot, but they're the lowest price bonded hunting bullets you can generally find. We'll see how they do.

Giant Isopod
Jan 30, 2010

Bathynomus giganteus

Yams Fan

kwantam posted:

.223 is absolutely sufficient for hogs if you can place your shots well. If you can't place your shots well, you shouldn't be hunting anyway.


I did some googling about a bit and found this is one of those subjects that everyone has a different opinion on ranging from "nah, its fine, get 'em in the ear with a .22" and "anything less than .300 win mag and they'll bounce right off!" so I was being a little presumptuous with what I had said earlier about "commonly used calibers" that was just what I had read from one source I should have done more research.

kwantam posted:

A Mosin would be fine but hogs are usually encountered in packs.

Yeah, I while a mosin might be ok-if-kinda-lovely for deer or something I absolutely can't imagine using it on something that might charge you if you just wound it.

Sometimes in these kinds of threads people caught up in technical things like how you could make a Mosin work, without realizing that some people will take that as actual advice thinking its a good gun for the job.

OWLS!
Sep 17, 2009

by LITERALLY AN ADMIN


I have an Finnish M39 that is set to taste bambi blood, and nothing can stop me.

n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

kwantam posted:

A Mosin would be fine but hogs are usually encountered in packs.

That's what the bayonet is for.

Oxford Comma
Jun 26, 2011
Oxford Comma: Hey guys I want a cool big dog to show off! I want it to be ~special~ like Thor but more couch potato-like because I got babbies in the house!
Everybody: GET A LAB.
Oxford Comma: OK! (gets a a pit/catahoula mix)


n0tqu1tesane posted:

That's what the bayonet is for.

Bushman thinks you're all pussies, I'm sure.

Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

Don't let Lowtax go down with the ship. Do your part for these dead gay forums.


But you don't unlock the bayonet until level 25...

compton ass terry
Nov 20, 2006

Do you know where I'm from?

So I've narrowed it down to a marlin 336, marlin xs7, or one of the savage .308's. It would initially be used for boar hunting then maybe deer hunting later on. Thoughts?

compton ass terry fucked around with this message at 21:56 on Mar 27, 2012

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


compton rear end terry posted:

So I've narrowed it down to a marlin 336, marlin xs7, or one of the savage .308's. It would initially be used for boar hunting then maybe deer hunting later on. Throughts?

Marlin 336 is a very good choice and lever actions are easier for followup shots. A Savage .308 is the better choice if you will be shooting at a longer range.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Tubgirl Cosplay posted:

The safety's less an issue than them weighing a billion pounds, depending where and who you are leave the chamber unloaded or if just keep finger off the trigger and rifle pointed at the ground
I can agree that in a stand or blind you're fine as long as you keep your fingers off the bang switch, but I don't like the idea of going through brush and stuff with a loaded chamber and no usable safety.

compton rear end terry posted:

So I've narrowed it down to a marlin 336, marlin xs7, or one of the savage .308's. It would initially be used for boar hunting then maybe deer hunting later on. Throughts?
Marlin 336s are supposed to have a good reputation, almost bought one myself a few years back. .30-30 has always been described to me as being good for up to a little over 100 yards for deer sized game, after 100 yards or so the less aerodynamic round nose bullets it has to use for the tube mag start losing velocity pretty quickly. Hornady's Leverevolution may change that a bit, haven't used it myself. Plus side to the Marlin over a Win '94 is that the Marlins take scopes easily, if you're into that, and has irons if you're not.

Savage bolt actions with Accutriggers are nice, I had a model 10 in .223 for a while and it was very nice, although the caliber was boring. The cheaper models that don't have the Accutrigger are supposed to be pretty blah. ed: also agree with Atticus about the Savage .308 being better for longer ranges

I don't know anything about the xs7, but hopefully someone else does.

On it's face it seems you've got 3 good options, so assuming the xs7 checks out I'd say go with whatever feels the most comfortable and fun for you. If you opt for a bolt action make sure you budget in some room for a decent scope!

gimpsuitjones
Mar 27, 2007

What are you lookin at...

You're not going to get charged by a "hog".



Also buttstroking animals is actually a terrible idea, I've seen a few people with broken riflestocks from that. Might be ok with the 2x4 stock on a mosin.

Tubgirl Cosplay
Jan 10, 2011

by Ion Helmet


Dr. Strangler posted:

I made the mistake of going on a couple hunting/camping trips with a redneck friend of mine who just straight up hates animals. Like, all animals, for no reason.

We hadn't even gotten where we were going before he got out of his truck on a county road to punt a opossum over the guardrails. It only went downhill from there (the trip, not the opossum).

I think it's less a sadism thing than a slightly unbalanced Vietnam vet thing

I can see how people would not want to come along on our family hunting trips.

gimpsuitjones posted:

Also buttstroking animals is actually a terrible idea, I've seen a few people with broken riflestocks from that. Might be ok with the 2x4 stock on a mosin.

Can't say I'd recommend it generally, and definitely not with most commercial guns.

Parts Kit posted:

I can agree that in a stand or blind you're fine as long as you keep your fingers off the bang switch, but I don't like the idea of going through brush and stuff with a loaded chamber and no usable safety.

Fair enough. It was serviceable when I tried it, but that was one of several reasons why I switched over to the FAL recently. Maybe one of these days I'll have the money to blow on a proper hunting rifle (though I will dearly miss the looks on the faces of the Realtree crowd)

How well do blinds actually work out on the East Coast compared to just stomping through the woods? I see them everywhere, but it seemed like it'd be damned rare to just happen to have a deer walk into the ~25yd line of sight you normally get out here without baiting.

Tubgirl Cosplay fucked around with this message at 23:52 on Mar 27, 2012

msj817
Apr 1, 2003

Please help me help you forget about Jozy.

So it's that time of year again where we are tending our land, building new feeders and blinds, building more hog panels, and all the fun that implies.

Does anyone have any experience with building food plots, specifically in very dry areas?(in this case, West Texas). This is our second year on this land and our first year was immense(I personally took a a red stag, a red hind and a white tail doe,)..we also have elk, dove, quail, turkey etc etc. Basically everything Texas has to offer. The key now is keeping them attracted to our land. Keeping them "fed" isn't that much of an issue as we are surrounded by wheat fields(dove season is lovely), but we do want to keep sweetening the pot for them to make us part of their routines outside of the rut.

I don't want to clog up the thread with talking about PH levels and seeding so PM'ing me is just fine

Oxford Comma
Jun 26, 2011
Oxford Comma: Hey guys I want a cool big dog to show off! I want it to be ~special~ like Thor but more couch potato-like because I got babbies in the house!
Everybody: GET A LAB.
Oxford Comma: OK! (gets a a pit/catahoula mix)


gimpsuitjones posted:

Also buttstroking animals is actually a terrible idea, I've seen a few people with broken riflestocks from that. Might be ok with the 2x4 stock on a mosin.

If you can beat a moose to death with your rifle, then goddamnit, you deserve that kill.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Tubgirl Cosplay posted:

Maybe one of these days I'll have the money to blow on a proper hunting rifle (though I will dearly miss the looks on the faces of the Realtree crowd)
That's seriously the best part of hunting with milsurp. At the club my relatives hunt at I'm still recognized as "that guy who uses some weird rear end rifle from the 50s" even though it's been been like 4 years since I killed that doe with my Hakim and have since gotten a Remington 700. I can't wait to see how they react to my SVT40, or possibly if I decide to go against my own advice and take my repro M39 sniper out for coyotes in one of the mostly brush free fields.

Blinds and shooting houses work, but seem to be really dependent on placement. You've got to poke around during the off season to locate good potential areas, and planting stuff like clover is also a good way to encourage the deer to come out. Even then there's a big element of luck. I've been in very nice small fields of clover and seen absolutely nothing for hours, then the next day a deer just walks in at about 50 yards oblivious to me.

kwantam
Mar 25, 2008

-=kwantam


Hey guys I went hunting today.





This is a scimitar Oryx. In about a week it will become much more difficult to hunt them in Texas. Basically, since they're more or less extinct in the wild, the feds have decided that all Oryx must be centrally managed. Anyone who keeps Oryx on their ranch, even if they are more or less captive exotics, will need a permit to hunt them and will receive a yearly allotment of tags.

Well gently caress that. I decided to go get me one now.

This is actually not a particularly large specimen; it's more or less a juvenile. A full grown bull is about 450 lbs, whereas this guy tips the scales around the mid-200s. On the other hand, he'll be delicious.

If you're observant, you'll note that I was hunting with my FAL (with plastic furniture in place of my nice wood). Turns out the trilux is a really decent midrange hunting scope, so I'm guessing this gun will see further duty on pigs and during deer season.

Federal Fusion worked well enough. Didn't recover the bullet, so I can't comment beyond that.

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gimpsuitjones
Mar 27, 2007

What are you lookin at...

Holy poo poo coolest animal. Send me some.



Nice Tshirt.

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