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Outrail
Jan 4, 2009

www.sapphicrobotica.com


wesleywillis posted:

I'm in.
Once the plague is done, goon hunting trip to NZ!!

I've only ever read about the goon camps in the 2000's, but I'm not sure if adding firearms is a good idea or a bad idea. Or a great idea.

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Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

BORN TO DIE
HAIG IS A FUCK
Kill Em All 1917
I am trench man
410,757,864,530 SHELLS FIRED




Outrail posted:

I'm not sure if adding firearms is a good idea or a bad idea.

CEASE FIRE BITCH

GOD drat

Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

I went to a couple of goon meets in the UK in the mid 2000s and most people were pretty chill.

In any case if anyone makes it here post-covid I'm happy to show you around, I always enjoy an excuse to get outdoors.

Also I made some biltong from the deer I got after converting an insulated /ventilated box that the previous owner built in the garage into a biltong box. Just tried some and was pretty tasty though I'm thinking I'll leave it another couple of days as it's still slightly softer than I like.



Mzuri
Jun 5, 2004

Who's the boss?
Dudes is lost.
Don't think coz I'm iced out,
I'm cooled off.

charliebravo77 posted:

Here's some more of the better ones. I want a lab now.

Thanks for sharing I love watching good hunting dogs at work! Also want a lab...

DapperDraculaDeer
Aug 4, 2007

Shut up, Nick! You're not Twilight.

Hunting with and handling dogs seems so awesome. It kind of makes me wish I was less of a cat person and more of a dog person.

Apollodorus
Feb 13, 2010

TEST YOUR MIGHT


Does anyone here have significant bow hunting experience? Care to give any n00b advice w/r/t equipment and training?

I was warned off it last time I asked here, but the bow season is so long where I live (2 entire months before muzzleloader starts vs 2 weeks each for ML and guns) and I had so few chances in 2020 that I feel dumb not trying to start archery this year.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


Iíve been archery hunting for the past 6 or 7 years but I hunt private over bait (more often than not) so my experience is going to be different.

However Iíd be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Apollodorus
Feb 13, 2010

TEST YOUR MIGHT


Cool, thanks. I anticipate doing tree stand hunting on public land, primarily, since that's what's near me (including some archery-only land) and I'm confident enough in my athletic conditioning to pack a stand in and climb it. Do you use a stand? Any recommendations?

I also understand that even though I do a lot of strength training, drawing a bow is its own thing and I'm not ready for a 60-70lb bow yet. So I'm thinking of getting one of those highly adjustable entry-level bows, like the Bear Cruzer, so I can practice at home and gradually increase the draw weight. Does that make sense? Any other bows you might recommend?

crazypeltast52
May 5, 2010




I have a Hawk climbing stand that I picked up on Camofire, they have safety harnesses on sale semi-regularly now that the season is over. Safety harnesses are usually rated for 5 years from the date of manufacture so the mark down does come with the caveat that it is one less season of useful life.

My bow is Mission Hammr that I like and have been able to get decent practice with at some public ranges near me.

DapperDraculaDeer
Aug 4, 2007

Shut up, Nick! You're not Twilight.

Drawing a bow is definitely one of those things that seems to result in rotator cuff injuries. If youve been training your bench for a while and been doing accessory exercise to help with rotator cuff health itll definitely pay some dividends with a bow. I started at a 55lbs draw weight and moved up to 70lbs pretty quick without any problems. I own a Hoyt and its very easy to adjust the draw weight in the 55-70lbs range. Adjusting your draw length on the other hand is a really big deal and its why its important to get properly fitted for a bow. It seems like a really good idea to stop at your local archery pro shop to get fitted. This time of year a lot of bows start going on clearance too so you might be able to get more of a mid-end bow for a low-end bow price.

Apollodorus
Feb 13, 2010

TEST YOUR MIGHT


I'm a little wary of going to the archery shop--even though there is one right near me and it's a good one, by all accounts--because of COVID precautions. Well, and also, as I mentioned earlier I have a now-6-week-old baby at home and leaving the house for an afternoon is not necessarily an option. So that's why I'm leaning towards a bow that can be adjusted for draw weight and length easily, even if it means a bit of a performance hit in other regards.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


I would 100% wait until you can get to an archery shop safely. Getting a bow that fits you and getting proper instruction is incredibly important.

Apollodorus
Feb 13, 2010

TEST YOUR MIGHT


Yeah that's tough; who knows how long until it's "safe", after all? I suppose I should be willing to wait and pay a price premium, if my experience buying shoes at an actual running store (where it was definitely worth it) is any indication.

They have a good range, too, but it's indoor.

Lothas
Aug 24, 2012


2020 was my first year hunting. I bought a 30-06 rifle as everything was closing down for the pandemic thinking because it was such a popular caliber it would stay in production and be in abundance with all the ammunition manufactures running at reduced capacity.

That was a terrible idea, 30-06 ammo has been almost impossible to find.

I think I have seen more 300 win mag than almost anything else whilst shopping for ammo so I'm considering getting a 300 win mag rifle for this hunting season. Has anyone else had similar experience when looking for ammo? Are you seeing different calibers easily available more frequently?

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



I have been casually looking for 22 ammo now for close to 6 months. Good luck finding anything besides shells. Which actually leads me to my question and why I stumbled into TFR.

I use it hunt years ago when I lived in Alaska but havenít now in close to 8-9 years. I never grew up hunting so my knowledge is limited strictly to what I learned up there.

Ive recently thought it would be fun to go pheasant hunting, while also using the same gun potentially for squirrels and duck hunting down the line. So I was thinking something like a 20 gauge semi auto shotgun with a longer barrel would be in order. Does that seem like a reasonable idea or am I better off going with a 12 gauge? I do already own a single shot 12 but it was a pain in the rear end duck hunting with so I was thinking a semi auto or pump action would be better.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Lothas posted:

2020 was my first year hunting. I bought a 30-06 rifle as everything was closing down for the pandemic thinking because it was such a popular caliber it would stay in production and be in abundance with all the ammunition manufactures running at reduced capacity.

That was a terrible idea, 30-06 ammo has been almost impossible to find.

I think I have seen more 300 win mag than almost anything else whilst shopping for ammo so I'm considering getting a 300 win mag rifle for this hunting season. Has anyone else had similar experience when looking for ammo? Are you seeing different calibers easily available more frequently?

Literally everything was sold out at my local WalMart. I think there was a solitary box of 20 gauge non-lead.
The LGS I visited last week had .45-70, some uncommon handgun calibers (I think .38 super and .327), .22 WMR, and .223 that had been bought in bulk and was packaged in 5-round sets in plastic bags.
The previous LGS I'd visited had rat shot in a few calibers, some .45ACP that was priced too high to move, higher end 12 gauge and .50 BMG, .45-70, and some rifle caliber I didn't recognize.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


45-70 is the answer obviously.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


Around here you can find 350 Legend and 450 Bushmaster. Occasionally 22WMR or 17HMR. I used to see 270 but not really anymore. But last time I looked, target shotshells could be picked up by the case from Academy, and hunting loads were reasonably available.

BaseballPCHiker posted:

Ive recently thought it would be fun to go pheasant hunting, while also using the same gun potentially for squirrels and duck hunting down the line. So I was thinking something like a 20 gauge semi auto shotgun with a longer barrel would be in order. Does that seem like a reasonable idea or am I better off going with a 12 gauge? I do already own a single shot 12 but it was a pain in the rear end duck hunting with so I was thinking a semi auto or pump action would be better.

I am looking for a similar purpose gun - squirrel, dove, and clays primarily. Don't want to do a ton of damage to any small game I shoot. Was also thinking a 20 gauge semi would be the right call vs a 12 gauge, but I'm curious to see what responses you get.

Lothas
Aug 24, 2012


I feel your pain on all the ammo being sold out. The only handgun ammo Iíve been able to find is 500 S&W and some other really obscure calibers.

I actually saw some bags of 9mm that looked hand loaded being sold for $60 for a 30 round bag recently.

Iíve got some 150gr 30-06 ammo from a tiny store near where I live. Iíve only hunted deer so far and it worked great for that however I live in Colorado and wanted to try elk hunting this year.

Iíve been told 150gr will have trouble stopping an elk. Has anyone got any experience trying to bag an elk with 150gr 30-06? Mainly is it so bad Iím better off buying a new rifle in a different caliber or just stick with it?

Lothas fucked around with this message at 04:18 on Jan 20, 2021

Outrail
Jan 4, 2009

www.sapphicrobotica.com


I haven't gone after elk yet so just speculating based on what I've read, but I suspect someone is going to say 'it's all about shot placement and 150 can stop an elk, but ethically 165gr 30-06 is the lowest reasonable bullet to use' then some more talk about impact velocity.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Lothas posted:

I feel your pain on all the ammo being sold out. The only handgun ammo Iíve been able to find is 500 S&W and some other really obscure calibers.

I actually saw some bags of 9mm that looked hand loaded being sold for $60 for a 30 round bag recently.

Iíve got some 150gr 30-06 ammo from a tiny store near where I live. Iíve only hunted deer so far and it worked great for that however I live in Colorado and wanted to try elk hunting this year.

Iíve been told 150gr will have trouble stopping an elk. Has anyone got any experience trying to bag an elk with 150gr 30-06? Mainly is it so bad Iím better off buying a new rifle in a different caliber or just stick with it?

What bullet is it?

Typically for elk itís advisable to have a sectional density above .250 for a given caliber. What that means is 168 grain or heavier for 30-06. I would say the exception are copper monoís which you can get away with a lighter weight since they penetrate better, retain nearly 99% bullet weight and have higher muzzle velocities.

Bullet construction is also a big consideration for elk. You definitely want a bonded bullet or a copper mono. You donít want really explodey ballistic tips like you might use for deer.

You have 8 months to find ammo. Premium hunting ammo will be one of the first things to become available again. Setup a shitload of online notifications on Midway for ammo and make a habit to stop at brick and mortar retailers looking for ammo. It will come back eventually.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Discussion Quorum posted:

I am looking for a similar purpose gun - squirrel, dove, and clays primarily. Don't want to do a ton of damage to any small game I shoot. Was also thinking a 20 gauge semi would be the right call vs a 12 gauge, but I'm curious to see what responses you get.

12 gauge really doesnít tear up game anymore than 20 gauge does, it just gives you a wider pattern at the same pellet density. Choke selection, shot size and target distance are what determines the damage. Keep in mind game is usually being hit by 5-10 pellets out of the few hundred sent down range. A 12 gauge might launch 250 pellets and a 20 gauge might launch 175 pellets all at the same speed. All shotgun pellets are traveling at the same speed, you just get more of them with a 10 gauge than a .410.

12 gauge is never a bad choice for hunting but neither is 20 gauge with a 3Ē chamber. Iíve shot everything from doves to turkeys with both. 20 gauge gives up some potential when shots are 40-50 yards but inside of 30 yards the difference is negligible especially if you spring for nicer 20 gauge ammo.

20 gauges are somewhat preferable for upland hunting because they can be 1 lb lighter in the same gun and carry easier. 12 gauge is more popular all around. Both 12 and 20 gauge ammo is commonly available.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Apollodorus posted:

Cool, thanks. I anticipate doing tree stand hunting on public land, primarily, since that's what's near me (including some archery-only land) and I'm confident enough in my athletic conditioning to pack a stand in and climb it. Do you use a stand? Any recommendations?

I also understand that even though I do a lot of strength training, drawing a bow is its own thing and I'm not ready for a 60-70lb bow yet. So I'm thinking of getting one of those highly adjustable entry-level bows, like the Bear Cruzer, so I can practice at home and gradually increase the draw weight. Does that make sense? Any other bows you might recommend?

Iíve had both high end portable hang on stands and climbers for public land hunting and I really prefer the climber to something like a lone wolf alpha and sticks. It feels more secure to me and itís faster for me.

My climber is a Summit Viper. Both setups were right at 21 lbs and were equally a pain in the rear end to pack around because the platforms were the same size.

The hang on and sticks did allow you to use weird shaped trees and it does allow clearer shooting lanes for archery without the cross bar of a climber.

A saddle is likely a better archery option. The hunting public just put out a video on saddles vs hang on stands. Depending on the setup a saddle can quite a bit lighter and the platform is narrower than your shoulders which is a huge plus.

Lothas
Aug 24, 2012


Flatland Crusoe posted:

What bullet is it?

Typically for elk itís advisable to have a sectional density above .250 for a given caliber. What that means is 168 grain or heavier for 30-06. I would say the exception are copper monoís which you can get away with a lighter weight since they penetrate better, retain nearly 99% bullet weight and have higher muzzle velocities.

Bullet construction is also a big consideration for elk. You definitely want a bonded bullet or a copper mono. You donít want really explodey ballistic tips like you might use for deer.

You have 8 months to find ammo. Premium hunting ammo will be one of the first things to become available again. Setup a shitload of online notifications on Midway for ammo and make a habit to stop at brick and mortar retailers looking for ammo. It will come back eventually.

These are the bullets: https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/ppu-30-06-springfield-sp-150-grain-20-rounds?a=1584554

They donít seem to meet the level you suggested though so I shall keep an eye on Midway and the local stores.

charliebravo77
Jun 11, 2003



Lothas posted:

These are the bullets: https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/ppu-30-06-springfield-sp-150-grain-20-rounds?a=1584554

They donít seem to meet the level you suggested though so I shall keep an eye on Midway and the local stores.

That PPU stuff has been hilariously inconsistent and inaccurate for me in 7mm08. It would not even be in the first 10 options I would consider for hunting. Like Flatland said, set up some Midway stock alerts for Barnes, Nosler, Federal, HSM, etc hunting loads and stick with the good stuff.

DapperDraculaDeer
Aug 4, 2007

Shut up, Nick! You're not Twilight.

Apollodorus posted:

Yeah that's tough; who knows how long until it's "safe", after all? I suppose I should be willing to wait and pay a price premium, if my experience buying shoes at an actual running store (where it was definitely worth it) is any indication.

They have a good range, too, but it's indoor.

Im still super new to archery so Im hesitant to comment beyond describing what my own experiences have been, but it seems like even getting a highly customizable bow you are going to end up going into the shop to have it setup properly for you. Bowsmithing is a thing you can do at home but its not nearly as accessible as doing basic stuff with firearms. In my case I did a lot of reading on how to measure myself and setup the bow and I did get a used bow that fit me, but I ended up taking it into the shop after the second time I punched myself in the face due to failing to correctly tie a D-loop. Basically, a visit to the bow shop seems like its inevitable for archery newbies and the sooner you go in and get everything setup properly the less likely you are to repeatedly punch yourself in the face.

Apollodorus
Feb 13, 2010

TEST YOUR MIGHT


Flatland Crusoe posted:

A saddle is likely a better archery option. The hunting public just put out a video on saddles vs hang on stands. Depending on the setup a saddle can quite a bit lighter and the platform is narrower than your shoulders which is a huge plus.

I think you're right. Thanks for the recommendation -- I don't think I even know about hunting saddles, to be honest. It looks more comfortable than a stand, actually, to say nothing of the greater portability. I have a couple of trees in my back yard that would let me practice, too.

JRay88
Jan 4, 2013


At the end of the hunting season the weapon is most likely going to be one of the cheaper things youíve spent on. Itís also going to be the one thing that is the most critical to having a successful hunt. Spend the extra time/money and have it set up right. There is NOTHING more frustrating than going on a hunt and having your weapon malfunction because you tried some DIY setup to save time or money.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


DIY archery stuff (fletching arrows, getting a bow press, replacing strings) is not cheap. Iíve been getting more into doing all of my own setup and tuning and the equipment to do so is adding up big time.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


BaseballPCHiker posted:

I have been casually looking for 22 ammo now for close to 6 months. Good luck finding anything besides shells. Which actually leads me to my question and why I stumbled into TFR.

I use it hunt years ago when I lived in Alaska but havenít now in close to 8-9 years. I never grew up hunting so my knowledge is limited strictly to what I learned up there.

Ive recently thought it would be fun to go pheasant hunting, while also using the same gun potentially for squirrels and duck hunting down the line. So I was thinking something like a 20 gauge semi auto shotgun with a longer barrel would be in order. Does that seem like a reasonable idea or am I better off going with a 12 gauge? I do already own a single shot 12 but it was a pain in the rear end duck hunting with so I was thinking a semi auto or pump action would be better.

Where are you at? Pheasant hunting is a fools errand in much of the country compared to a generation ago. Ducks are doing better but tend to be fairly concentrated regionally.

A semiauto is definitely better than a pump but means spending $600-$1800 instead of $300-$400 for a pump. 12 and 20 gauge are both viable for both species especially with advances in nontoxic ammo. 20 gauge has really advanced in duck hunting over the last 5 years and is very popular amongst bird hunters.

For barrel length 26-30Ē is common for both applications.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Thanks for all of the replies and responses.

I'm in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota. So pheasant hunting for me involves trips to the SW part of the state, or on to some land my grandparents own in Iowa.

I think I'll go with a 20 gauge just for the weight reduction, with 28 inch barrel if I can find one. I'm trying to buy used to save some money. Is $800 a reasonable budget or should I expect to be looking at up to $1300 no matter if its used or new? Also any brands to specifically avoid? Its probably pretty obvious but I'm not an expert, and I've always tended to believe its "the indian not the arrow" when it comes to hunting equipment, but I also believe in buy once cry once.

Loving Africa Chaps
Dec 3, 2007


We had not left it yet, but when I would wake in the night, I would lie, listening, homesick for it already.



Kerro posted:

I went to a couple of goon meets in the UK in the mid 2000s and most people were pretty chill.

In any case if anyone makes it here post-covid I'm happy to show you around, I always enjoy an excuse to get outdoors.

Also I made some biltong from the deer I got after converting an insulated /ventilated box that the previous owner built in the garage into a biltong box. Just tried some and was pretty tasty though I'm thinking I'll leave it another couple of days as it's still slightly softer than I like.





Where in the UK are you based (I'm London)? Doing some stalking is on my to do list this year so I'm going to do an intro to rifle course and think about dsc1. Seems like UK stalking is either guided or know someone with a bunch of land. I've also been on the look out for a side by side to do some walked up shooting next season.

crazypeltast52
May 5, 2010




BaseballPCHiker posted:

Thanks for all of the replies and responses.

I'm in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota. So pheasant hunting for me involves trips to the SW part of the state, or on to some land my grandparents own in Iowa.

I think I'll go with a 20 gauge just for the weight reduction, with 28 inch barrel if I can find one. I'm trying to buy used to save some money. Is $800 a reasonable budget or should I expect to be looking at up to $1300 no matter if its used or new? Also any brands to specifically avoid? Its probably pretty obvious but I'm not an expert, and I've always tended to believe its "the indian not the arrow" when it comes to hunting equipment, but I also believe in buy once cry once.

Hello fellow MN hunter, I donít see why you wouldnít be able to find a decent used gun in that range.

Iím about $800 into my new Mossberg 500 12 gauge between the slug barrel and glass but before counting chokes and all that. It is a pump action so Iím not sure what the semi-auto would do the the pricing though.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


BaseballPCHiker posted:

Thanks for all of the replies and responses.

I'm in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota. So pheasant hunting for me involves trips to the SW part of the state, or on to some land my grandparents own in Iowa.

I think I'll go with a 20 gauge just for the weight reduction, with 28 inch barrel if I can find one. I'm trying to buy used to save some money. Is $800 a reasonable budget or should I expect to be looking at up to $1300 no matter if its used or new? Also any brands to specifically avoid? Its probably pretty obvious but I'm not an expert, and I've always tended to believe its "the indian not the arrow" when it comes to hunting equipment, but I also believe in buy once cry once.

You live on the eastern edge of both good pheasant and waterfowl habitat. SW MN is the only place Iíve ever killed a wild pheasant personally. Waterfowl hunting gets better as you roll west into the prairie potholes. Eastern SD is the best waterfowl hunting Iíve ever seen.

I would look at Benelli M2ís, Beretta A400ís, Franchi Affinity 3ís and Winchester SX4ís. My personal preference in a 20 gauge is a 26Ē barrel but 28Ē for a 12 gauge.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


I was able to snag a used a400 lite this past summer for ~750 out the door. If you have a cabelas near you check out their gun library. I find stuff there pretty frequently and you can get discount GCs from raise.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


Flatland Crusoe posted:

12 gauge is never a bad choice for hunting but neither is 20 gauge with a 3” chamber. I’ve shot everything from doves to turkeys with both. 20 gauge gives up some potential when shots are 40-50 yards but inside of 30 yards the difference is negligible especially if you spring for nicer 20 gauge ammo.

You've convinced me to think and read a bit more, and I think I'll go with 12 gauge. I figure if I really get into upland stuff I'll be able to spring for a nice 20 gauge O/U down the line. Seems like 12 gauge will let me try just about everything. I might have the chance to go hog hunting with a friend later this year and while Plan A would be to borrow a rifle from my buddy, plan B would probably be slugs. It's mostly thick woods here and 25-75 yards is what I hear is a typical shot on deer, and I assume hogs would be similar.

Since most of my shooting will be at clay, I'm thinking gas is the way to go. Looking at a Beretta A300 for around $675 after shipping and FFL unless someone says that's dumb.

Ophidian
Jan 12, 2005

Woo WOO, Look a Parrot...
LOOK AT IT!


https://www.gunbroker.com/item/889801702

You shouldnít have any trouble sticking around that budget for an a300

Ophidian fucked around with this message at 17:11 on Jan 21, 2021

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Discussion Quorum posted:

You've convinced me to think and read a bit more, and I think I'll go with 12 gauge. I figure if I really get into upland stuff I'll be able to spring for a nice 20 gauge O/U down the line. Seems like 12 gauge will let me try just about everything. I might have the chance to go hog hunting with a friend later this year and while Plan A would be to borrow a rifle from my buddy, plan B would probably be slugs. It's mostly thick woods here and 25-75 yards is what I hear is a typical shot on deer, and I assume hogs would be similar.

Since most of my shooting will be at clay, I'm thinking gas is the way to go. Looking at a Beretta A300 for around $675 after shipping and FFL unless someone says that's dumb.

I have an A300 that has been utterly reliable for 8 seasons of duck hunting and is often used for clays. They are hands down one of the best values in guns out there right now.

My only minor gripe with the A300 is the recoil impulse is it but harsher than the A400/391/390 series has shotguns. Also they canít take magazine tube extensions because of the gas piston layout if you want to play 3 gun or do conservation season snow goose hunts.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


Flatland Crusoe posted:

I have an A300 that has been utterly reliable for 8 seasons of duck hunting and is often used for clays. They are hands down one of the best values in guns out there right now.

That's good to hear. I'm near the Texas coast, but waterfowl aren't in my immediate future. That has more to do with a steep cliff of gear and learning solo as I don't know anyone who hunts duck. Nice to have it as a future option, though.

Ophidian posted:

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/889801702

You shouldn’t have any trouble sticking around that budget for an a300

I ended up ordering from Impact Guns for $652 after a $20 coupon code (WELCOME20). Shipping was less than $15. That coupon will get me... 2 whole boxes of shells!

I saw some complaints about them being slow to actually ship but I don't care if it takes a while longer. They don't charge until fulfillment and I won't sign up for any clay lessons until I'm able to get a COVID vaccine anyways.

(I called a few local pawn shops about used semis and the response was "lol")

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Kerro
Nov 3, 2002

Did you marry a man who married the sea? He looks right through you to the distant grey - calling, calling..

Loving Africa Chaps posted:

Where in the UK are you based (I'm London)? Doing some stalking is on my to do list this year so I'm going to do an intro to rifle course and think about dsc1. Seems like UK stalking is either guided or know someone with a bunch of land. I've also been on the look out for a side by side to do some walked up shooting next season.

I'm back home in New Zealand now - was in Oxford for a few years but wasn't into hunting at that point. It definitely looks a lot harder in the UK, like you need to know someone who's got access as you say.

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