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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I don't think I ever will again

I've found more dropped screws with my heel than I ever wanted to. I tend to do a fairly clean sweep now

Here's some more softcore conduit porn:

(west wall of the second bedroom)


(north wall)


(east wall)

It takes some real getting used to bending conduit, especially 1". It might help if I measured, but I've only screwed up irreparably twice so far, usually I do fine with eyeballing and careful tweaking. Each drop is approx. 6-7 feet of conduit (except the ones on the west walls) so I haven't wasted anything yet, if I screw up on a bend I just flip the 10 footer of conduit around and try again on the other end, then the screwed up bends end up in the drop section that I really can't use anyways.

I'm thinking I may continue all the second floor comms/network conduit drops through the ceiling all the way to the top of the chimney chase I put all the other conduit in, since I've decided to put down 3/4 ply in the attic so I can use it for storage. If I don't, I'll end up with much longer cable runs to each drop, or damaged cables from stepping on / dragging things over them on the floor. Decisions, decisions. It shouldn't cost me more than around 50 bucks in materials to do it, it's more a matter of figuring out how to do it neatly without compromising the structure at all.

In other news, I read up on firestopping and it turns out I've already done approx. 90% of my firestopping simply due to my OCD framing style. At every opportunity I add extra framing at the top of walls to attach the drywall to so I can avoid cracking and flexing and many of the extra bits I've added also serve as firestops.

e: fixed images

kastein fucked around with this message at 19:53 on Nov 7, 2016

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thecobra
Aug 8, 2011

by Y Kant Ozma Boo


kastein posted:

I don't think I ever will again

I've found more dropped screws with my heel than I ever wanted to. I tend to do a fairly clean sweep now

I saw this video on YouTube, and came here to post it because of the nailgun talk. I didn't realize the conversation had already progressed to screws. Have it anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-kyjvNrdCY

splendadietcoke
Sep 15, 2008


Soft-core conduit porn thread is arousing. Thanks for the images/updates, that look down the "convenient utility passageway" is artful.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


No new pictures, but:

* finished subflooring in second bedroom
* almost finished wiring in second bedroom, aside from lights - ran out of materials, need a trip to home depot tomorrow.
* finished framing in second bedroom, including the wall separating the closet from the room and the RO for the closet door. One closet wall still not done because I need to do more demolition before I have clear space to work, but now I can hang extra poly sheet / vapor barrier to block off the closet from the bedroom and finish the rest of the room without a problem.
* did some firestopping - not done, need more wood. Also need to pick up some firestop expanding foam to fill all the various holes I've bored for wiring.
* installed furring strips on the slanted rafters in the lab/office, since they are old construction and nowhere near parallel the ceiling would have been quite lumpy there. So I put 10' lengths of unbent conduit across the top and bottom, screwed to the lowest-hanging rafters, and furred out the others to match them as closely as I could.
* pulled all remaining lath tacks and scraped all the old plaster residue off the old construction studs and rafters I'll be attaching drywall to.

A few more firestops, a little more electrical, some vapor barrier and blown in insulation, and I can start drywalling. One of my neighbors lent me his drywall hoist, and a friend of mine offered to help out, so we should be able to make pretty short work of the drywall.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Finished the electrical (except the light fixture box + cable drop, as I haven't decided where the lighting is going yet) in the second bedroom, finished firestopping the lab/office, finished sealing the wiring holes with firestop foam, installed vapor barrier in the lab/office, vacuumed up all the existing dust/construction debris (construction debris is so much nicer smelling than demolition debris!) in the lab/office and blew in insulation in two walls and part of the ceiling of the lab/office.

I need to buy something like 20-24 sheets of drywall, then it's game on. In the meantime I'm going to firestop, clean, and vapor barrier the second bedroom.

The second I have the lab/office plastered and painted I'm moving up there and going into high gear. I'm tired of sleeping on a goddamn couch in my dining room.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Flat ceiling is now completely rocked, working on the last 2 panels on the sloped ceiling then I need to go get more for the walls.

It's already a good 10-20 degrees cooler in that room than the rest of the house just from the vapor barrier, insulation, and some of the drywall being installed. I could almost get used to this.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


THIS JUST IN

Fellow goon ACEofsnett dropped by today and we spent the entire day sheetrocking. The whole lab/gooney hacker den/third bedroom is now rocked. Gonna spend tomorrow going stir crazy with a razor sharp utility knife, a roll of fiberglass joint tape, and a 5 gallon pail of joint compound. Then I need to figure out what color I'm painting this room, paint it, and MOVE IN!

I can't wait to sleep in a real bed again, in a real bedroom, instead of on a free hand-me-down couch in my dining room, surrounded by demolition dust, dirt, mice, bugs, baskets of laundry, and power tools (it's been hell, but the nearly ten thousand dollars I've saved on rent by doing so has definitely helped pay for house repairs and some other hobbies.) It's hard to resist the temptation to start moving up there now, before I even finish and paint the walls.

Once I get one more bedroom finished, I'll spend a while vacuuming the dust and stuff off of everything I have packed into boxes in my living room, restack it all upstairs, then finish the master bedroom and upstairs hall, poly sheet off the stairwell, set up a simple positive pressure ventilation system to keep the dust out of the "nice" area of the house, and go full retard on the first floor demolition.

My cellphone went retarded a few days ago and stopped working at all, so no real pictures for quite a while, I'm going to find my actual camera and take some if I can find the data cable for it. Here's a bonus cellphone pic taken today while I was hanging drywall:


The box on the slanted ceiling is power to the track lights for the workbench/desk that will be under it. The rectangular box on the wall is for the thermostat, the one on the ceiling is for the right rear surround sound speaker wiring, and the square box on the ceiling with the two cables hanging from it is for the linked 120v powered fire/smoke/co detector.

For reference I am standing in front of the rough location of the old chimney.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


kastein posted:

The third picture from the last post shows what used to be in these pics before I tore it down.

A photo from a while ago... same "wall" (well, it was torn down in this picture.)

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Seems like the door past your legs is really small. It's not the only entrance, is it? Gonna need some serious Ikea flat-pack furnishings up in there if so.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


hahahaha, that's some of the framing that supports the second floor electrical subpanel

The door you can see in that pic is for the other bedroom, it's on the other side of the wall to my right.

I need to draw up/digitize the floorplan for those two rooms so I can get a radiant layout and parts quote from blueridge, so I'll have to post it here as well.

Also gently caress bagster, those assholes have "tried" 3 times to pick up my latest load of debris and it's been sitting there for months. They were days late the first time, then left it there and cancelled the order without telling me why. The next time, they were only a day late and cancelled it again. The last time (after I called up and bitched them out) they told me somehow my cellphone number got corrupted in their system, so they re-entered it and put in a note to the driver to call 1 hour before arrival. Well, they didn't, and the next day I checked and the bags were still there with a note saying the truck wouldn't fit down the road to pick them up, which is loving bullshit because the driver for the first 2 or 3 loads I did told me he had the biggest truck in the fleet and that thing fit down the road no problem.

At this point I'm just waiting till I get a new job and then renting a dumpster, then I'll use the comanche's crane attachment to load the remaining filled bagsters into the dumpster, fill it with whatever other debris I have at the time, and off it goes. Since I've cleared up a good amount recently I actually have a spot to put a dumpster that a rolloff truck can get to, so this might actually work now.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Oh heh. It looks like windows casting light on a wall in the next room.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


casting light yes, wall? nope.

That room is framed in, but all it has is wiring and a subfloor. I need to fireblock, vapor barrier, insulate, and sheetrock it still.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.










Poisonlizard
Apr 1, 2007


Looking great kastein, are you doing the texturing yourself?
Also, I don't envy all the taping to be done there (this from a man who has done a shitload of tape and bed).

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I won't be doing any texturing, just regular old semigloss or eggshell paint, haven't decided which.

I'm not looking forward to taping mudding and sanding. Not one bit. I was going to start today but I ended up driving all over the state hauling various jeep parts to people I'd struck deals and/or trades with and just got home.

Poisonlizard
Apr 1, 2007


kastein posted:

I won't be doing any texturing, just regular old semigloss or eggshell paint, haven't decided which.

I'm not looking forward to taping mudding and sanding. Not one bit. I was going to start today but I ended up driving all over the state hauling various jeep parts to people I'd struck deals and/or trades with and just got home.

One piece of advice, your drywall trowel (the rectangular one) should have one edge that is concave, and fits perfectly over a taped joint with just enough mud. Most people don't notice (hell I had to have it pointed out to me), but it makes it go much easier keeping the right side to the wall.

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


Man, you really don't want those sheets coming off do you? Three in the field would have been plenty on those walls, man.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's how I roll... you should see the roof decking and the subflooring! I don't think I've left more than 6" gap anywhere.

It's more me worrying about the spackle cracking at the seams - the more screws I put in, the less flex there is between the two sheets, and the less I have to worry about redoing some of the mudding. God I loving hate mudding.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

Looking good man... makes me even more keen to get my drat build underway. The house planning/design is 95% completing (waiting on engineering and bushfire checks to finalise the design) but im stuck waiting for the god drat land developers to hurry the gently caress up and actually turn our block of dirt from a cow paddock into my own drat title.

Then there WILL be a build thread, but currently it would just be a photo of a rough guess of where my little bit of grass covered in cow poo poo actually IS.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


damnit! Where the hell is my wide putty knife?

And why did no one tell me that the self adhesive fiberglass mesh tape peels off from heat/humidity if you leave it for more than a day or two before mudding it?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


approximately half the room now has the first layer of mud applied. The other half will have to wait for some time that isn't 3AM, because it's time for me to pass out.

Eggplant Wizard
Jul 8, 2005


i loev catte


I read through the whole thread yesterday and it's really interesting to watch you work, even though I don't know what half the stuff you're talking about is (Sweating...?). It makes me want to be handy but I know I don't have the patience for it. Keep on updating! You know, when you're not getting much-needed sleep.

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

kastein posted:

damnit! Where the hell is my wide putty knife?

And why did no one tell me that the self adhesive fiberglass mesh tape peels off from heat/humidity if you leave it for more than a day or two before mudding it?



I used to use the mesh tape until I discovered the paper tape; way better IMO. You'll want to make sure to embed the tape in joint compound (whether its mesh or paper) ie lay a bed of joint compound in the seam, then embed the tape in the compound then feather it out

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


EW, sweating = soldering copper water pipe. Basically you use a wire brush or piece of emery cloth on the pipe and fitting so they're perfectly clean, apply some acid flux with a brush to keep oxidation away while you're heating the joint (and aid in solder wetting) and then torch it till it's really hot, then touch the solder to the spot where the fitting and pipe meet. The solder melts and capillary action draws it into the space between the two, it kinda looks like the pipe is sweating solder.

dwoloz - I've seen paper tape used and I know it'd frustrate the hell out of me.

PyrE
Feb 1, 2005

Soldier? Check.
Flight? True.
Commie? NO!
Rich? Quite.

I hate paper tape. I always used to get cracks in it or my tape would peel off when trying to mud over it. I guess they make mud with glue in it now, but I am in absolute love with the fiberglass mesh. You really should consider applying texture to your walls and ceiling if you are not happy with your mudding skills. It hides so so many flaws and means a lot less sanding.

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

Awesome updates, I love seeing everything coming together and all the planning/future proofing with the conduit runs. Nerd boner!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I won't be using paper tape or texture, just something I don't want to do. Texture is harder to clean and also harder to patch without it being obvious.

I'm not real happy with my mudding skills right now, but I'm sure by the time I'm done I'll have had enough practice to be good at it. Right now I'm basically planning 3 layers - the first is what I'm doing at the moment, where I basically just force as much mud into the gaps between the sheets as possible (through the mesh), and try to make sure the mesh is fully coated but not to the point that it stands proud of the surface of the drywall. I'm using tapered edge drywall, so most of the major joints aren't a problem here, except the ends of the sheets and the spots I had to cut to fit. The next coat (after sanding the first mostly flat and getting rid of lumps/ridges/sloppy stuff I left behind) will be done with a wider knife and should smooth almost everything out, then I'll sand that down and recover any low spots and bumps I can still see, then resand and paint.

I have an orbital sander I bought at a pawn shop almost brand new years ago (literally - in 2009) while I was still planning on buying a house instead of actually owning one and repairing it, so the sanding shouldn't be too bad. Will probably use those neat sanding sponges to get into the corners the sander won't fit in.

e: realized I forgot to install one outlet I wanted in this room, a 220 volt 15 or 20 amp dedicated outlet for either an air conditioner or a ham radio HF amplifier depending on what season it is. Fortunately, the wall that I was going to put it on only has drywall on one side right now, so I'll just cut a hole for the box and put it in from the back before I drywall the other side.

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

I don't have a whole lot constructive to add on the drywall front, I've done one room and that was with the help (well, I was the help) of a professional drywaller. For what it's worth we used paper tape and the room turned out really really really, especially the ceiling. I did pretty much all the sanding it and it was all by hand, I don't know if I'd recommend using something powered, it would be way too easy to burn through your mud and/or tape.

There was a huge time investment, though, even for such a small room. The next room I'm going to try and do myself, but I know it's not going to turn out that great.

I also over-screwed everything and wish I wouldn't have. I only had one screw pop but apparently the 3 in the field or whatever is what the pros do for a reason.

Dolphin
Dec 5, 2008



kastein posted:

I won't be using paper tape or texture, just something I don't want to do. Texture is harder to clean and also harder to patch without it being obvious.

I'm not real happy with my mudding skills right now, but I'm sure by the time I'm done I'll have had enough practice to be good at it. Right now I'm basically planning 3 layers - the first is what I'm doing at the moment, where I basically just force as much mud into the gaps between the sheets as possible (through the mesh), and try to make sure the mesh is fully coated but not to the point that it stands proud of the surface of the drywall. I'm using tapered edge drywall, so most of the major joints aren't a problem here, except the ends of the sheets and the spots I had to cut to fit. The next coat (after sanding the first mostly flat and getting rid of lumps/ridges/sloppy stuff I left behind) will be done with a wider knife and should smooth almost everything out, then I'll sand that down and recover any low spots and bumps I can still see, then resand and paint.

I have an orbital sander I bought at a pawn shop almost brand new years ago (literally - in 2009) while I was still planning on buying a house instead of actually owning one and repairing it, so the sanding shouldn't be too bad. Will probably use those neat sanding sponges to get into the corners the sander won't fit in.

e: realized I forgot to install one outlet I wanted in this room, a 220 volt 15 or 20 amp dedicated outlet for either an air conditioner or a ham radio HF amplifier depending on what season it is. Fortunately, the wall that I was going to put it on only has drywall on one side right now, so I'll just cut a hole for the box and put it in from the back before I drywall the other side.
I would use paper tape. Mesh is great for hardibacker and cement board type applications where you're applying thinset, but it's a pain in the rear end with joint compound. Paper tape on the seems, metal corner bead on the outside corners, reinforced paper on the inside corners (not really all that necessary in my opinion but it's up to you).

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Hasn't been much of a pain in the rear end so far, in fact it goes quite nicely... haven't had the walls I did with it last fall crack yet, either, even with daily temperature swings in the 80 degree range due to me forgetting the space heater off in the bathroom once in a while.

I've used plastic corner bead so far but might switch to metal, I'm not sure what the difference is really.

First room is done as far as the first layer is concerned, I'm getting some shrinkage into the joints as expected so a second and probably third layer will be needed.

let it mellow
Jun 1, 2000



Dinosaur Gum

Dolphin posted:

I would use paper tape. Mesh is great for hardibacker and cement board type applications where you're applying thinset, but it's a pain in the rear end with joint compound. Paper tape on the seems, metal corner bead on the outside corners, reinforced paper on the inside corners (not really all that necessary in my opinion but it's up to you).

This is what I've found too. The paper tape allows for a thinner first coat, which I find easier to deal with over time.

Really, though, whatever you are comfortable with is fine. The only gotcha I've found with mesh is that if your bedding coat is too thin, it separates easily from the joint and that's a bitch to fix. With paper, I never had that happen.

^^^ I've found the metal easier to line up on long outside corners when you have multiple pieces and less likely to bend during installation. Also, with nails, you don't have a finite amount of set time like you do with the adhesive.

Keep up the awesome work, though, you're in the home stretch!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I dunno about that... I still have 3 rooms to gut, one room to shovel out, 3 rooms to put down new subflooring in, 4 rooms to run electrical in, 5 rooms to insulate and sheetrock, a heating system to install, a kitchen to finish, 14 windows to replace, two porches to tear down and rebuild, a chimney to build, a metric assload of asbestos siding to remove, a whole house worth of siding to install, and most of a foundation to repoint! Oh, a cement floor to pour in the basement, a few support columns to replace, a few sill plates to replace, and I need to get the electrical service upgraded at some point, too.

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

kastein posted:

I dunno about that... I still have 3 rooms to gut, one room to shovel out, 3 rooms to put down new subflooring in, 4 rooms to run electrical in, 5 rooms to insulate and sheetrock, a heating system to install, a kitchen to finish, 14 windows to replace, two porches to tear down and rebuild, a chimney to build, a metric assload of asbestos siding to remove, a whole house worth of siding to install, and most of a foundation to repoint! Oh, a cement floor to pour in the basement, a few support columns to replace, a few sill plates to replace, and I need to get the electrical service upgraded at some point, too.

I see no immediately catastrophic structural issues in this list, so yeah, home stretch

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


The support columns and sill plates don't count?

Now that I think about it, I am gonna do half of one of the sill plates tomorrow for a change of pace. I've been doing silly picky stuff like spackling and sheetrock for way too long now. And if I don't do the sill plates soon, I know I'm going to forget entirely about them until I've already sheetrocked the room over them, which will suck.

Guess I should find my 12 ton bottle jack, some cribbing lumber to support it, some large-ish lag bolts, and some bracing lumber to attach temporarily to the studs I'll be jacking up. I bought the new sill plate for this section last year and never got around to installing it.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


well, it's been balls hot for the last few days, so my motivation to jack up the house and work on the sill plates has mostly gotten me as far as walking out the door, realizing I'm standing in full sun and already sweating, then saying "man, gently caress this" and going back inside to work on the second floor instead.

I've done a bunch more mudding and sanding, I think I should be ready for paint in the first room (the lab/den) within a few days. The first layer of mud that actually filled the cracks between the sheets of drywall took several days to dry as it is presently very hot and humid here.

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

kastein posted:

I've done a bunch more mudding and sanding, I think I should be ready for paint in the first room (the lab/den) within a few days. The first layer of mud that actually filled the cracks between the sheets of drywall took several days to dry as it is presently very hot and humid here.

If you want to speed that up get one of those standing work light sets, the heat they put off helps dry the mud out, and the immense light helps you when you're sanding and looking for imperfections as well.

http://www.amazon.com/Designers-Edg...8656c7064757-20

Fuckface the Hedgehog
Jun 12, 2007



Yeah halogen light stands are great. Be warned though, as one of my dad's apprentices found out, they will set poo poo on fire.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's an awesome idea, think I will. So far I have been using a bright led headlamp to look for imperfections.

Jeherrin
Jun 7, 2012


dreesemonkey posted:

If you want to speed that up get one of those standing work light sets, the heat they put off helps dry the mud out, and the immense light helps you when you're sanding and looking for imperfections as well.

http://www.amazon.com/Designers-Edg...8656c7064757-20

Having used these (and similar) I now cannot bear the thought of filling/sanding a wall without one. The amount of stuff you miss without strong light sources right next to the wall is unbe-loving-lievable.

And when you notice it two months down the line, it's also unbelievable depressing.

Your house makes me want to tear down walls in my flat, so badly.

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


allnighter with the orbital sander and my PowerStriders! Sleep schedule's been getting more and more hosed recently and it's about time I finished something and fixed my schedule at the same time.

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