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Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I got curious, and this page says that a 16d box nail in a Douglas fir 2x4 has 33 pounds of pullout force. That's a fairly large amount, certainly, but you should be able to achieve that much force using a (moderately large) rare earth magnet. Of course, since rare earth magnets can't be switched off, you'd then be left with the problem of how to remove your nail from your magnet...

kastein posted:

So ~240 pounds or more pullout force.

Well, now, let's keep something in mind. If you simply plant the business end of your magnet up against the head of a nail, then it doesn't do poo poo: you're going to have to pull on your magnet with the same amount of force it takes to pull out the nail, and then what was the magnet for?

So instead, I guess we're talking about holding a magnet some distance away from the nail (minimum clearance for the nail to come all the way out, so at least as high as the nail is long), and the nail comes flying out. Equal and opposite reaction etc. etc. means either you're moving the magnet into place on some kind of rig, or you're still having to deal with all the force of the nail-pull being exerted downwards on you holding up the magnet. So I'm thinking like a rolling wheeled tool with a chamber above which hangs a powerful magnet. Might look a bit like a lawnmower.

In any case, since we're trying to invent a useful nail-pulling magnet powered machine, we need to account for the distance between the strongest part of the magnetic field, and the nail itself. So it's not "how strong of a magnet do you need" but "how strong of a magnet do you need at X distance from the metal" so maybe at least 3 or 4"? We may also have to account for nonferrous alloying components because nails probably aren't all 100% iron, right? And you've maybe got the problem of what happens to every loose ferrous object in the room when you bring in or turn on a magnet strong enough to yank a nail out of the floor from a foot up or whatever.

That 240 pounds kastein is estimating is probably the momentary force exerted perpendicular to the surface of the wood in order to get the nail loose, and then I expect it takes a lot less ongoing force to overcome the ongoing friction of prying the nail the rest of the way out, which means we probably only have to care about the maximum force in the equation; that needed to get the nail moving. Perhaps with an electromagnet we can get by with an initially strong pulse followed by a weaker steady pull, which would save us on power a bit?

But now let's consider how much force is also being exerted by the magnet on, say, the galvenized pipe you forgot was under a nearby section of the kitchen floor...

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Mister Dog
Dec 27, 2005



Leperflesh posted:

Well, now, let's keep something in mind. If you simply plant the business end of your magnet up against the head of a nail, then it doesn't do poo poo: you're going to have to pull on your magnet with the same amount of force it takes to pull out the nail, and then what was the magnet for?

So instead, I guess we're talking about holding a magnet some distance away from the nail (minimum clearance for the nail to come all the way out, so at least as high as the nail is long), and the nail comes flying out. Equal and opposite reaction etc. etc. means either you're moving the magnet into place on some kind of rig, or you're still having to deal with all the force of the nail-pull being exerted downwards on you holding up the magnet. So I'm thinking like a rolling wheeled tool with a chamber above which hangs a powerful magnet. Might look a bit like a lawnmower.

In any case, since we're trying to invent a useful nail-pulling magnet powered machine, we need to account for the distance between the strongest part of the magnetic field, and the nail itself. So it's not "how strong of a magnet do you need" but "how strong of a magnet do you need at X distance from the metal" so maybe at least 3 or 4"? We may also have to account for nonferrous alloying components because nails probably aren't all 100% iron, right? And you've maybe got the problem of what happens to every loose ferrous object in the room when you bring in or turn on a magnet strong enough to yank a nail out of the floor from a foot up or whatever.

That 240 pounds kastein is estimating is probably the momentary force exerted perpendicular to the surface of the wood in order to get the nail loose, and then I expect it takes a lot less ongoing force to overcome the ongoing friction of prying the nail the rest of the way out, which means we probably only have to care about the maximum force in the equation; that needed to get the nail moving. Perhaps with an electromagnet we can get by with an initially strong pulse followed by a weaker steady pull, which would save us on power a bit?

But now let's consider how much force is also being exerted by the magnet on, say, the galvenized pipe you forgot was under a nearby section of the kitchen floor...

Why you gotta ruin this for us?

MrPete
May 17, 2007


Just use one of these for removing nails instead of your weird rear end magnets.

http://nailkicker.com/

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Of course, since rare earth magnets can't be switched off, you'd then be left with the problem of how to remove your nail from your magnet...

With a prybar obviously.

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


MrPete posted:

Just use one of these for removing nails instead of your weird rear end magnets.

http://nailkicker.com/

Why is it these sites never have a "How it works" page? I don't wanna buy it but I drat sure want to see what makes it tick.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Leperflesh posted:

That 240 pounds kastein is estimating is probably the momentary force exerted perpendicular to the surface of the wood in order to get the nail loose, and then I expect it takes a lot less ongoing force to overcome the ongoing friction of prying the nail the rest of the way out, which means we probably only have to care about the maximum force in the equation; that needed to get the nail moving.

You're right - they are triangular old style nails cut from flat metal stock, not modern round nails, so once you get them to budge about 1/4-1/2 inch, they usually slide out by hand with two fingers.

As for that nail kicker, it's really cool looking until you realize that it doesn't pull the nails, it just pushes them all the way through the board. Not really what I want.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!



I wonder how one of these would compare to your 3' pry bar. http://kk.org/cooltools/nail-puller-2/

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Holy poo poo, I need to go buy one of those immediately. That's amazing.

So far I've been using these when the head snaps off, or on the little tiny nails that lath is held up with... they work pretty well. http://www.amazon.com/Crescent-NP11-11-Inch-Pulling-Pliers/dp/B008NM6VAA

IIRC I got mine at TSC or Home Depot.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

Beach Bum posted:

Why is it these sites never have a "How it works" page? I don't wanna buy it but I drat sure want to see what makes it tick.

I agree with you, that poo poo's the worst, but I found it for this thing:

http://nailkicker.com/pages/nail-kicker-v20-2

Scroll down to "Versatile". Basically it's an air chisel with a special tip. It pushes nails out.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


The terrible loving shed the previous owner "built" has been torn down and I am enjoying the heat it produces when thrown in the burn barrel right now.

Good riddance.

I hadn't considered demoing it yet, but :siren: MY GIRLFRIEND :siren: suggested tearing it down, and it really did make the place look way better. Well, sorta... we still have to drag the stuff that was in it to the curb or into the basement, so the yard is more of a mess, but that shed was a goddamned eyesore.

kastein fucked around with this message at 00:41 on Mar 20, 2016

Plastik
Oct 14, 2005

ARE YOU TELLING ME SITTING HERE DOING NOTHING ISN'T HELPING? DAMN, WELL YOU JUST CONVINCED ME NOT TO TRY AT ALL!


Lipstick Apathy

Did we ever see pictures of your eyesore shed? I can't remember having seen it.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Ripping out the lovely old shed in the backyard is a rite of passage for new homeowners. When I removed mine, I had help from my neighbor. He helpfully dropped a wall on me. Fortunately a) I caught it, and b) it was a small wall.

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

I didn't even know you had a shed, I just assumed you were keeping your lawn implements and dismembered prostitutes in the five-ton.

iForge
Oct 28, 2010

Apple's new "iBlacksmith Suite: Professional Edition" features the iForge, iAnvil, and the iHammer.

I, too, had no idea you had a shed and Ive been to your house.

I use a pair of fencing pliers for pulling nails. It also makes removing carpet staples so easy.

edit: holy poo poo ive "used" one of those nail pullers before. i thought you held the arm by the jaws and slid the handle back like a slide hammer and cursed it for being lovely. Now it all makes sense.

iForge fucked around with this message at 04:35 on Mar 20, 2016

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


It was in the corner behind the brick pile with a huge amount of scrapmetal stacked up next to it :v:

I don't know if any quality pictures exist of it. It was "built" using fenceposts and non pressure treated 2x6s, not a single post or beam was straight, level, or square. It rested on 4 post-base cement blocks, with no floor. It was poorly triangulated with haphazardly nailed on 2x4s and the roof joists (flat roof) were random chunks of 2x6 and 2x4 patched together into a sort of grid. The roof was 3/4 plywood and they never even put all of it on, and the walls were T1-11 siding, nailed, stapled, and drywall screwed onto the posts and beams, bulging over the crossbracing. In some places the siding went 3 inches into the ground, in other places it was 6" above ground at one end of a wall and 18" above ground at the other end. The back wall was never even sided at all because they realized they built it against a tree only after finishing the rest, so it was more of a 3 wall shanty with half a roof.

I always planned on knocking it down when the house was done, but we ended up killing it yesterday.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

It was in the corner behind the brick pile with a huge amount of scrapmetal stacked up next to it :v:

I don't know if any quality pictures exist of it. It was "built" using fenceposts and non pressure treated 2x6s, not a single post or beam was straight, level, or square. It rested on 4 post-base cement blocks, with no floor. It was poorly triangulated with haphazardly nailed on 2x4s and the roof joists (flat roof) were random chunks of 2x6 and 2x4 patched together into a sort of grid. The roof was 3/4 plywood and they never even put all of it on, and the walls were T1-11 siding, nailed, stapled, and drywall screwed onto the posts and beams, bulging over the crossbracing. In some places the siding went 3 inches into the ground, in other places it was 6" above ground at one end of a wall and 18" above ground at the other end. The back wall was never even sided at all because they realized they built it against a tree only after finishing the rest, so it was more of a 3 wall shanty with half a roof.

I always planned on knocking it down when the house was done, but we ended up killing it yesterday.

I so wish you had pictures of this, it sounds amazing.

Jeherrin
Jun 7, 2012


kastein posted:

It was in the corner behind the brick pile with a huge amount of scrapmetal stacked up next to it :v:

I don't know if any quality pictures exist of it. It was "built" using fenceposts and non pressure treated 2x6s, not a single post or beam was straight, level, or square. It rested on 4 post-base cement blocks, with no floor. It was poorly triangulated with haphazardly nailed on 2x4s and the roof joists (flat roof) were random chunks of 2x6 and 2x4 patched together into a sort of grid. The roof was 3/4 plywood and they never even put all of it on, and the walls were T1-11 siding, nailed, stapled, and drywall screwed onto the posts and beams, bulging over the crossbracing. In some places the siding went 3 inches into the ground, in other places it was 6" above ground at one end of a wall and 18" above ground at the other end. The back wall was never even sided at all because they realized they built it against a tree only after finishing the rest, so it was more of a 3 wall shanty with half a roof.

I always planned on knocking it down when the house was done, but we ended up killing it yesterday.

Shame it didn't have stairs.

So you could insulate them.

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011

:getin:


kastein posted:

It was in the corner behind the brick pile with a huge amount of scrapmetal stacked up next to it :v:

I don't know if any quality pictures exist of it.

Not really quality, but I believe this is the thing.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Ba

By

Sharkytm doot doo do doot do doo




Fallen Rib

Also not great quality, but this one:


One of those in slightly higher res:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's the shed in question.

Some other imagery from days gone by:

Taken by my GF one day last fall while she was burning scrap wood in the yard


Taken by my friend Andrew at one of the many bonfires at my house before the fire department showed up and said "no more". Lighting this bonfire involved several quarts of gasoline and me sprinting by the bonfire pile as fast as I could with a lit blowtorch. Safe? No. Fun and effective? Yes. Don't lecture me on how to throw gas on fires*, I know. It might look like I was completely consumed by the bonfire but it was just the camera not adjusting its exposure fast enough to deal with the sudden blast of light.

* don't. Unless you are a professional redneck with a desire for skin grafts.

Splizwarf
Jun 15, 2007
It's like there's a soup can in front of me!

I like the spall of fireball to the lower right, it's like your inferno is havin' a baby.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Gasoline vapors are heavier than air and hella flammable. One of the many things you need to know if you want to play with gas without getting third degree burns :v:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Finally got my truck registered and fixed enough to barely drive, so its inaugural trip was dragging a huge pile of ugly scrapmetal to the scrapyard because we were tired of looking at it. It included the old washing machine, a multitude of castoff jeep parts, and the old oil tank from the basement.

So glad that pile of poo poo is gone. Took two trips.

Tomorrow I will probably bleed the brakes so it is less terrifying (the scrapyard is very close to home, so I just took it easy) and maybe make a run to home depot for some more subflooring. And I need to pick up a load of roadbase and fill in the growing potholes in the private road to my driveway.

E: pictures!

Ratty truck parked not where it sat sadly for 3 years:


ratty yard with lovely shed and most of the scrapmetal pile gone:


Ratty truck full of ratty scrap for the second trip:


Got rid of a multitude of castoff jeep parts, the oil tank, and the old washing machine. I had no idea that pile had so many coil springs, torque converters, brake rotors/drums, and wheel bearings in it till I dug in. Probably a thousand pounds of metal... I dropped it off at a local scrapyard's free weekend dropoff bin because scrap prices are in the toilet and I just wanted to not have to look at it anymore.

kastein fucked around with this message at 02:08 on Mar 27, 2016

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



I've got a sign made up that says "free scrap metal", and I just put metal and whatever else that may not be completely trash by the road.

I've easily gotten rid of 20 truck loads of crap that way. But that's an option when you live in the country and 80% of the traffic is pickups driven by persons who cannot control their urges when they see "free".

Reuse, recycle, right?

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

angryrobots posted:

Reuse, recycle, right?

You forgot the "reduce" part, which is arguably the most important part.

Also, Craigslist + 'free' = one (wo)man's trash is another (wo)man's treasure.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I've had enough random poo poo stolen out of my yard that I don't want more skeevy people in ratty trucks eyefucking my property. The one living here is bad enough, he keeps dragging random cheap/free poo poo home :v:

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

I live slightly out of the way of the approach route to the dump so sometimes I go and look in the bed of whatever the nastiest looking truck is at the local convenience store when I have to get rid of scrap.

Something something food chain.

kastein posted:

I've had enough random poo poo stolen out of my yard that I don't want more skeevy people in ratty trucks eyefucking my property. The one living here is bad enough, he keeps dragging random cheap/free poo poo home :v:

He keeps trying to make eye contact whenever he sees you using a mirror too. hosed up.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, I dunno what is up with that.

Anyways. There has been some slow progress on the house.

After the scrapmetal pile, the next truck priority was getting some 3/4" roadbase to fix the craters/potholes forming in the private road I and my neighbor the trucker share.

It squats real bad with only a half yard in the bed... needs new springs for sure. I mean, that is roughly 1500lbs, but still.

Then got back to work on the kitchen subflooring. Needed a 1.875" tall spacer board, no such thing exists so time to make one...


I got to the end of one wall doing floor tearup and found some more sketchy poo poo. Long story short, the subflooring and original flooring are still under the 3/4 underlayment plywood and linoleum the previous owners laid down because gently caress doing a proper tearout right??? Just slap another layer on top!

Wait. Some of those boards don't look like the others.

FFS.

There were lovely soft pine boards of the wrong thickness haphazardly nailed into this hole in the original finish flooring... I wonder what went here?

Answer: it's 24" deep and roughly 8' long and against a wall. I am guessing an old stove+oven setup or a counter/cabinet unit.


Also found some abandoned wiring going into the spot it would have been:

Insulating the ends of abandoned wires is for chumps, they were just cut off and taped into a bundle:


Apparently the steel they made nails from in 1890 was utter shite. This is how they often look when I pull them out.

The metal is super brittle and somewhat layered/fibrous/crystalline in appearance. This is what happened when I tried to bend the two sides of the split apart with my fingers.

And tried to bend the other half...


This is where I got to. One more sheet of subflooring installed, 1.5 more sheets worth of hole in the floor created. Unfortunately the retards who built this place put the studs of this weight bearing wall directly on the subflooring rather than a proper bottom plate, and there is nothing I can do about it now without cracking the drywall I did upstairs already.


We also spent some time doing preliminary kitchen layout planning but I haven't done detailed measurements and sketches yet.

kastein fucked around with this message at 16:12 on Apr 5, 2016

Jeherrin
Jun 7, 2012


I have nightmares about lovely cut nails. They're absolutely everywhere.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, I really hate em. I didn't know you could make steel that lovely.

Also I was reminded of another video that includes the lovely shed by an AI goon a few minutes ago, so here you go.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B58BChgRL4I

Hopefully tonight I'll get the truck running well enough for inspection and maybe put down another sheet and a half of subflooring.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Those nails look like wrought iron to me. True wrought iron is not made industrially any more (anything new called "wrought iron" is just made of mild steel). There are small-scale foundries making it now, but they're basically making an expensive niche product, and for most of the 20th century it wasn't being made anywhere.

Back in the 19th century, though? Yeah it was still around. It's not made in a blast furnace like modern steel. It has some great properties - it's more ductile, it resists corrosion once a surface layer of rust develops, it's easy to blacksmith. But... it has lots of included impurities that get worked (wrought) into a fibrous structure. It resists corrosion better than normal mild steel, but when it does corrode, it does it along those fibers, and so badly corroded wrought iron looks just like those nails of yours:
http://www.realwroughtiron.com/about-wrought-iron/what-is-wrought-iron/

So the answer is, no, they're not "lovely." They're made of a very long-lasting material, but they've exceeded their shelf life (perhaps due to being exposed to excess moisture for a century or more) and are failing in the expected way wrought iron fails.

Odds are if they'd been made of a modern mild steel, they'd be nothing but powdered rust by now.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Interesting! Thanks for the correction. Hell, if you or anyone else wants some, I can start throwing them in a bucket instead of sweeping them up with the rest of the demo debris and binning them. One person better take em all though, I don't care if they're split out to 20 people after that or sold or whatever, I just don't want the hassle of shipping a billion little boxes. In fact I'd actually really prefer a local person pick them up (if anyone actually wants them) because I am god awful at remembering to ship anything anywhere.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







I'm not sure there's much you can do with them once they're that far gone... maybe toss them into a smelter but unless you've got a wrought iron production process already, I don't think that's any different from just tossing in any kind of steel scrap.

But I'm not sure. Maybe post in the metalworking/blacksmithing thread, if you feel like it.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Most aren't that bad, that was a particularly bad one. The rest look just like they did when they were hammered in, but with a slight layer of rust or dirt on the top of the head.

I've not got much left to demo though so who knows how many nails I'll get out.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I tore up some more old flooring in the kitchen and found newspaper under it!


Dates and events mentioned all seem to be in the early 40s, in particular some articles discussing December of 1940 and a report from Helsinki concerning the Russian air force bombing civilians somewhere. This is also in line with a pre-Pearl Harbor print date, since it was written in a somewhat neutral tone rather than us having taken sides yet.

First layer of underlayment and linoleum self adhesive tiles pulled up:


A line drawn in the sandold flooring where I should stop ripping boards up for now:


Old flooring and subflooring torn up:


Thanks for the cut-off joist, fuckhead previous owner:

(fixing this is tonight's project. It was cut when the bathroom addition was built and suddenly a 6" cast iron sewer and numerous vent pipes had to run through the spot where the joist lived. So they just cut it out of the way, naturally.)

More loving rotten studs:



Strangely... five or six rotten studs in a row, right behind where I found rotten subflooring and an old lead sink drainpipe. Except the sill beam under them is still nice and solid. Hmmm.

More oddities start to crop up, the further I dig into this area. For example, there's no toenail holding this side of this joist end to the sill, but there is a hole left behind by an old wrought iron nail.


And on the other side of the same joist there's the remains of a wrought iron nail, flanked by two modern round mild steel nails and numerous hammer strikes. Hmmmmmmmm.....


Here's another odd feature. This rotten stud is so far gone that there's nothing supporting it anymore. Yet, there are no pencil or scribe marks on the top of the sill, no nails or remains of nails evident, and no mortise pocket in the sill beam.


The weirdness continues. A modern round mild steel nail once toenailed the base of this stud into this sill beam... behind the sheathing. This is the only sill beam in the entire house where no mortise and tenon joints are present and no wrought iron nails...


And more. A badly water damaged and rotted sheathing board directly over an untouched, perfectly sound sheathing board.


After seeing all this and thinking for a while I'm pretty sure I know what happened. I'm not the first person to replace sills in this house! This particular beam (and fortunately, only this one, so far) is a replacement, likely from the middle of last century. Whoever did it jacked the place up, cut all the wrought iron nails and tenons holding everything together, slammed the new sill in, haphazardly toenailed anything they could reach that wasn't completely rotted, and left all other rotted studs as they were rather than dig in deeper. Yet another hackjob perpetrated by a previous owner. It also led to this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qD7NGY44V8

Good thing I had the remains of a box of 6" HeadLOK structural screws on the shelf! They did a great job of bandaiding the split joist here.


After fixes. I use an angle bracket on each side of each joist, where possible. If not possible to reach both sides of a joist, I still put one on the other side.


I don't gently caress around when it comes to selecting fasteners. These angle brackets are nearly 1/8" thick and intended for mounting stair treads. The fasteners used are 1/4" diameter structural screws, 3" long into the sill and 2" long into the joist. It costs money, but I want this to be solid and my time is worth more than the materials used anyways.


That's it for now. When I get home tonight I'm going to attack the cut-off joist problem with some 6" RSS bolts, 2x12s, and concentrated previous-owner hatred. Once that's done I can clean up the remainder of the nasty dust on this section of framing and glue/screw down the new subflooring, then rip the next section up. I've also bought the new framing (going 2x6 stud again!) to redo the kitchen wall I redid back in 2011, because I had no idea how to frame a door opening properly then. We've also decided a window would be better than a door there (now that there's going to be a big patio door in the living room, it'd be superfluous, and putting a window in instead allows for another ~13 square feet of counter space and cabinets!) so the door opening will be going away entirely. I also somehow ended up getting a quote on nearly $2k worth of windows for this corner of the kitchen alone... god drat, bay windows are expensive.

Only a little more subflooring remains in the kitchen, then the kitchen demo is complete and there is one remaining room to demolish. Can't wait.

kastein fucked around with this message at 21:06 on Apr 25, 2016

Boaz MacPhereson
Jul 11, 2006

Day 12045 Ht10hands 180lbs
No Name
No lumps No Bumps Full life Clean
Two good eyes No Busted Limbs
Piss OK Genitals intact
Multiple scars Heals fast
O NEGATIVE HI OCTANE
UNIVERSAL DONOR
Lone Road Warrior Rundown
on the Powder Lakes V8
No guzzoline No supplies
ISOLATE PSYCHOTIC
Keep muzzled...


3 things:

1 - Finding old newspapers is cool as poo poo.
2 - Your crazy house problems scare the poo poo out of me.
3 - Jealous as hell of that Milwaukee right-angle drill.

What room are you doing now?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


That's the kitchen I'm working on right now. I was really hoping the joists would be fine, but hey, I should have known better. 120 years of JAFHOs is rough on a house.

The newspapers are cool to find, yeah. I found WW1 era newspapers under the siding a few years back, but sadly they got destroyed.

You know what really amazes me? That milwaukee right angle drill came from a used tool store near me. I paid like 60 bucks for it - and it came with its original steel carrying case, too. Easily my best tool purchase ever. I have to be careful with it because it'll rip the shank off of a paddle bit without even flinching if it gets stuck, and I have to stop driving structural screws a split second before the head contacts because the motor's rotor and the geartrain have enough momentum that it'll rip the head off a hardened structural screw instantly if you're still on the trigger when the head touches down. If it doesn't, it'll split the joist you're driving into in half. It's a tool to be treated with respect.

Full list, status wise:
Bathroom - gutted, subfloored, wired, insulated, sheetrocked, half mudded, plumbing functional
Master bedroom - gutted, new joists, subfloored, partially wired
Spare bedroom - gutted, subfloored, wired, insulated, sheetrocked
Spare bedroom 2/Office/Lab/Hacker Cave - gutted, subfloored, wired, insulated, sheetrocked, half mudded
Upstairs hallway - gutted, subfloored, partially wired
Living room - gutted, flooring is staying how it is, new wall and ceiling joists, partially wired
Kitchen - gutted, partially subfloored
Dining room - basically untouched and a disaster. I put my foot through the ceiling a few times accidentally while doing the subflooring in the spare bedroom, which is above it.

After the kitchen subflooring and dining room gut and resubfloor are done I can spend an entire weekend cleaning all my stuff and vacuuming up dust and then it'll be 100% nice new clean sawdust and plaster/spackle dust instead of nasty lovely old dust.

kastein fucked around with this message at 21:27 on Apr 25, 2016

the spyder
Feb 18, 2011


When I was 14 I bought one of those Milwaukee right angle drills brand new from Home Depot for $275. It's hands down one of the most likely tools to break your wrist. I wired a dozen houses with it. I finally snapped the chuck off driving 1/2" lag bolts in our beach house's deck support structure. I walked into Home Depot the next day and they replaced it under the 3 year warranty, no questions asked. Between this, my hole shooter, and supersawzall, I can demo/drill/fasten pretty much anything. Last of the USA made Milwaukee tools that really made their name great.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







kastein posted:

Most aren't that bad, that was a particularly bad one. The rest look just like they did when they were hammered in, but with a slight layer of rust or dirt on the top of the head.

I've not got much left to demo though so who knows how many nails I'll get out.

So, here's some sense of what they're worth. eBay has tons of "antique-look" "wrought iron" nails that are just modern repros, but it also has listings for original/recycled/used vintage wrought iron nails. The big ones are worth far more than the small ones.

If you don't feel like going to the effort of collecting a bucket of them just to get maybe thirty bucks, another option would be to donate them to your local blacksmith's association, if there is one. Failing that, nobody could really fault you for just pitching them. They're unusual, but not so rare that they're a super valuable resource.

Some more listings:
50x 2 1/4"
90x 2" rose head
50x 2"

Leperflesh fucked around with this message at 22:22 on Apr 25, 2016

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Huh. Not bad, about what I was expecting. If I still had a whole house to demo I'd probably run a magnet over the dustpiles to pick em out instead of sending them off with the debris, but at this point there are probably not enough left to even be worth it. There were some nice big ones, like 6-8 inches long, too. Oh well, not that big a deal.

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