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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Final Destination set is coming along nicely


Tipped the corner post back over and cut out the notches for the rim joists/beams.



Then stood it back up. This was my least favorite part. A wet 16ft 6x6 is right on the edge of what I can deal with and when they start going over, you're just along for the ride... Standing them up is sketchy since the center of gravity ends up about 9 feet up including the helical pile. I had to plan this very carefully, stand it up, then have my wife adjust the helical pile cap till the beam lined up with the slot, then hold it in place (from the safe side) while I jumped down to temporarily nail it in place.


Temporary diagonal brace installed to bend the rim joist straight. It has a warp to it and will until it's had time to set in its new position.


Got started on the long side of the porch. Using scrap wood as temporary posts until the rest of the helical piles are in.


Rim joist/beam is done all the way to the far end!


Not perfectly straight but drat close. No one will notice that it's a half inch out hopefully. I got it perfect on the plane that actually matters (the floor will be flat) at least.



All done for now.


Just need to get around to marking the locations for the stair piles and make an appointment with them again, and I can finish the posts and start on the roof.

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tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Is it fine for the deck to be flat since there are gaps in the decking to allow water drainage away from the house? I've never dealt with building a deck. Figure you'll have the info loaded answer to this.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Correct. For tight porches with no gaps between the boards (old style) you want the boards to be perpendicular to the wall of the house and sloped at around 1/8 to 1/4 inch per foot so they shed water. This also implies joists parallel to the house wall and 45 degree mitered corners if it wraps around. For more modern style open decks and porches that can drain between the boards, you can put the boards either way and no slope is required. Since my house is 140 years old and almost nothing is square, level, or straight, I chose open and am building the porch to be perpendicular to the house walls. The longer stretch of ledger I actually got really lucky and it's perfectly level but the wall it's attached to leans outward several inches in 14 feet vertical. The shorter wall is thus tilted toward the street and also leans North very very slightly. So my longer section of porch floor is tilted 5/8” down away from the wall so that it's on the same plane as the other section, which doesn't slope away from its wall at all but slopes about 2.5" down toward the longer section. Basically picture a carpenters square laid on a level table with a marble under the short end's tip and that's the way it's oriented.

Last night I managed to get the stakes placed for the two stair footings, but I'm 99% sure I pounded them into bedrock (it's lovely schist here and you can usually pound a rod a couple inches into the freeze damaged upper layers before it stops dead) so those are almost certainly getting more concrete poured instead of helical piles :sigh: I'm really glad I paid 25 dollars for this janky concrete mixer at a yard sale, I've certainly got my money's worth out of it already.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


kastein posted:

Since my house is 140 years old

What do you think the average age of your house is now?

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

Having muscled around 10' 6x6s this summer I can't imagine having to deal with the extra 6'. Those things go wherever they want to.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


H110Hawk posted:

What do you think the average age of your house is now?

Uhhhhhhhhhh by mass, volume, hours, or dollars?

Dreesemonkey, yeah, it was pretty sketchy and I'm very glad that part is done now.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


kastein posted:

Uhhhhhhhhhh by mass, volume, hours, or dollars?

Dreesemonkey, yeah, it was pretty sketchy and I'm very glad that part is done now.

Mass or volume, dealers choide. Blood sweat and tears don't count.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

kastein posted:

Dreesemonkey, yeah, it was pretty sketchy and I'm very glad that part is done now.

Did you consider using an elevated engine lift to move the 6x6? :v:

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

Did you consider using an elevated engine lift to move the 6x6? :v:

I had to use my car jack when mine went where I did not want it to go :v:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I didn't, mostly because I got it on the first shot and the place it needed to go is a steep slope so it would end badly. That being said, what's with that vycor stuff on your joists? Weather protection?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


H110Hawk posted:

Mass or volume, dealers choide. Blood sweat and tears don't count.

Mass I'd say around 1885. The foundation is like 3 to 4 feet thick in places and it's all fieldstone and brick. Only a few thousand pounds is new mortar, I reused 99% of the stone where I rebuilt it.

Volume I'd say around 1970 to 1980. :v:

dreesemonkey
May 14, 2008


Pillbug

kastein posted:

I didn't, mostly because I got it on the first shot and the place it needed to go is a steep slope so it would end badly. That being said, what's with that vycor stuff on your joists? Weather protection?

Yea. Since I was reusing my joists that are probably 15 years old, it's supposed to help prevent water from penetrating the screwholes and rotting out the boards. Considering my 15+ year old joists were still in good condition and did not have this done to it prior, I don't think it's necessary when using new lumber. But I've seen a few places recommend it as best practice on new construction as well.

Since I'll have double the number of holes in the joists I figured it was cheap insurance against it rotting out prematurely. It was probably about $100 of materials for my 16x22 deck.

SouthShoreSamurai
Apr 28, 2009

It is a tale,
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.




Fun Shoe

ITT Kastein questioning someone else over-engineering their build...

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





SouthShoreSamurai posted:

ITT Kastein questioning someone else over-engineering their build...

He's just trying to figure out new and novel ways to increase his own over-engineering!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, my question was more me wondering if it was something I should consider than anything else :v: I think I'll skip it but it's good to know about.

2 more of the 4 remaining helical piles were installed today. We hit bedrock too close to the surface on one remaining one and I'm going to have to pour more concrete. The other may just be a very large flat piece of fieldstone, won't know till I dig it up. I've got pictures but I don't feel like uploading them at the moment, probably more progress soon and I'll lump them in with that.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Marked out the locations for the stair supports.


Gigantic hydraulic screw gun, basically...

Not gigantic enough to go through these rocks which were a few inches down exactly where one of the remaining porch supports had to go.

After about 3 feet (minimum before it's legal is 4 feet for a helical pile) we hit rocks that it simply wouldn't move. It felt like bedrock. At least it churned up the soil a bit and made it easier to dig.

Trying for the next helical pile. This one was a bastard and we were afraid we were gonna hit the water main (since I never did end up finding it) but it ended up going in, although an inch or two off from where I wanted it.

Mason twine up, time to do the ones for the stairs. Only one ended up going in, because...

... this loving concrete slab was a few inches down under the other.

so I broke it and got it out of the hole.

had to dig the other hole 4 feet deep to pour the footing, or it would frost heave.

hole dug and forms set up

the drat rock pile from digging this hole is the same size as the dirt pile.

decided to take a break from that (since I had to wait for the inspector to look at the forms before pouring)
so it's time to fix the rest of the frame/sheathing right around the front door, since the porch roof is no longer in my way.

First cut rotten bullshit out of the way until it's all gone...

New cripple studs in, now that I have access. Didn't want to try and screw them in place with a wall in the way before.

New sheathing on

Second porch corner post up! Temporary bracing just to keep it level and square.

3 big-rear end stainless carriage bolts to hold it to the rim joist/beam.


concrete poured in the form, took 7 bags.


My beekeepers suit arrived so I decided it was time to kill those fuckers that stung me a month or two ago. The sheathing on this bathroom was a patchwork nightmare since apparently it's had 3 different sizes of windows in 2 different walls, so I ripped it all off and put plywood on.




whoever built the foundation for this bathroom mortared a wrought iron cut nail into one of the joints for reasons I cannot understand. (no signs of any others to put a level line on, nothing that makes sense to attach to it... no idea)

New sheathing on the uphill side...

And the downhill side...

And the end...

New-new window in. I hosed up reframing this opening in 2011 because I didn't know what the hell I was doing yet so it's been on the list of things to redo since then. Redid it with true dimensional lumber salvaged from a wall we weren't keeping inside.

Helical pile installer came back yesterday to do the last one, and I laid the stringers for the stairs out about where they'll go.


Hoping to get the rest of the porch support posts up this week/weekend, but who knows, I might work on something else instead.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






I am so damned lazy compared to you. Nice work.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


My last serious update was a month ago... I really wish this was going faster. We did take a week off to go camping and I was horribly sick another weekend though. I guess that's my excuse for only getting in about 2 weekends of work in a month :v:

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007


Well what's attached to a leash that it made itself?
The punchline is the way that you've been fuckin' yourself





Still looks like more than I get done in a year.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




"I only get in two weekends worth of work a month" says utter madman building a bomb-proof house out of principal, spite, and jeep parts. :v:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I don't think I've actually built any of it out of Jeep parts yet.

Put the ceiling ledger board up on the short side.

Bolted the corner post to both rim joists/beams. Had to be careful to not have the bolts collide.

Trimmed a post to clear the joist bracket right next to it



Most of the posts on the short side up...

... And all of them are up

Epoxied the anchor bolt into the second footing

All but one of the posts are up now

Ceiling ledgers going up on the long side too now

This one doubles as a ceiling rafter for the short side

All the posts are up!

Cut the short side posts to length, put the brackets on, bolted the two layers of this double 2x10 frieze beam together and put it up.


All the long side posts are also cut to length and bracketed but it was dark when I finished and I forgot to take pics.

Pulled the old windows out of this wall a few days ago and put the housewrap up. Got the windows in today.



Loaded the remainder of the broken concrete from the old furnace pad and porch pads, random fencepost footings etc into the 4x4 wheelbarrow and drove it up the hill to the dumpster that arrived this morning.


Welded the custom bracket for the top of the 6x6 corner post together. Turns out no one makes a 90 degree top cap for 6x6 that takes two 2x 2x10 beams so after discussing it with the inspector I fabricated one. It will be going to a facility in Everett for hot dip galvanizing as soon as I've gotten the welds (which are nothing to write home about, but strong enough) approved and screw hole locations agreed upon and drilled.

Rest of the album here. I don't have good captions for them so look if you feel like it. https://imgur.com/a/OmKBlOK

Tomorrow I hope to get some more rotten sheathing replaced, two more old windows pulled out, another run of housewrap done and two new windows in. Might repoint some sections of the foundation that are falling apart too and strip some more old siding off.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:


Pulled the old windows out of this wall a few days ago and put the housewrap up. Got the windows in today.


Never stop the Improv.

SyNack Sassimov
May 4, 2006

Let the robot win.
            --Captain James T. Vader

kastein posted:

Pulled the old windows out of this wall a few days ago and put the housewrap up. Got the windows in today.



The Locator posted:

Never stop the Improv.

Yes, And...ersen

SyNack Sassimov fucked around with this message at 00:51 on Oct 21, 2019

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Put more housewrap up and the last two new windows!

Had to replace some sheathing boards that were really hosed from the roof leaking on them for, oh, years, maybe decades.


Getting this beam (a 16ft PT 2x10 with two 12ft PT 2x10s ledgerloked to it) up there alone without falling or damaging anything required a bit of clever trickery.


Started the ceiling joists on the short side


One of the posts was leaning too far out so my Appalachian-American winch brought it back in, then put a joist in to keep it there.


Started the ceiling joists on the long side too.


Bracket is trimmed to final shape and all screw holes are drilled. I showed it to the inspector and his comment was "this is for a single family residence porch roof? You could park a bulldozer on that." I guess he is ok with it. Brought it to the galvanizing shop Friday, hopefully it will be back soon.

stevobob
Nov 16, 2008

Alchemy - the study of how to turn LS1's into a 20B. :science:




kastein posted:

Bracket is trimmed to final shape and all screw holes are drilled. I showed it to the inspector and his comment was "this is for a single family residence porch roof? You could park a bulldozer on that." I guess he is ok with it. Brought it to the galvanizing shop Friday, hopefully it will be back soon.


I'm surprised that he was surprised, at this point.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


stevobob posted:

I'm surprised that he was surprised, at this point.

Old inspector vs new-new inspector.

Old inspector realized by mid 2012 that he was wasting his time because I overbuild everything to the Nth degree. He would occasionally stop by and look around and leave again. I didn't bother filing permits for anything from basically early 2012 through this spring because he didn't care, he was busy busting shady contractors asses.

I didn't realize it but we got a new inspector several years ago. Didn't hear anything from him until he realized I existed this spring. He was NOT AMUSED by my complete lack of permits at first (very understandably) but after I filed a couple and some permit modifications he realized he didn't really have to worry about me complying with code and lost interest because a homeowner like me is really not worth it when the permit fees barely cover the time he spends, our permit rate is pretty low and without labor rate being involved my permits end up being like, 70 dollars for what will take him 3 inspections. Unfortunately I just found out last week that he quit. So I'm on my third building inspector, who made the bulldozer comment.

daslog
Dec 10, 2008

#essereFerrari


You know it's a long project when you measure milestones based on which building inspector approved the work.

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

What are your plans for siding? I can't deny that since I bought my 1860s house I've turned into a bit of a purist, but I really think cedar clapboards is the best bet. The hardiboard replacement stuff just looks so...out of place on an old house.

The good news is that cedar siding will only rot if you really screwed up flashing something, and even then it will take a while.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


mcgreenvegtables posted:

What are your plans for siding? I can't deny that since I bought my 1860s house I've turned into a bit of a purist, but I really think cedar clapboards is the best bet. The hardiboard replacement stuff just looks so...out of place on an old house.

The good news is that cedar siding will only rot if you really screwed up flashing something, and even then it will take a while.

If I was gonna stay here long term I would put cement fiber clapboard up, or maybe cedar shingle with stain. As it is, I'm tossing 1400 bucks of vinyl siding on it and selling it. I'm still planning on using verandah HP vinyl trim but I'm not looking to spend 4 or 5 grand on hardiboard when 99% of people are fine with vinyl.

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

Fair enough. And thanks to your structural efforts, in 400 years when this is the last house standing in New England, at least a future owner will have the option of putting on something historically appropriate.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





I hesitate to ask this but do you have any sort of idea as to when you'll be selling this masterpiece? I'm guessing springtime at the earliest just from the weather ya'll get up there.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Great question. Probably anywhere from February or so through spring, yes.

tetrapyloctomy
Feb 18, 2003

Okay -- you talk WAY too fast.

Nap Ghost

Roughly where is this place, anyway?

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Ba

By

Sharkytm doot doo do doot do doo




Fallen Rib

Between heaven and hell.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007


Well what's attached to a leash that it made itself?
The punchline is the way that you've been fuckin' yourself





kastein posted:

Great question. Probably anywhere from February or so through spring, yes.

Man, how long has this been in the making?

Is the plan to move out west on that property you bought and build another bomb proof house?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


In order:
Central Mass.

Closer to hell.

Yeah that's the plan. This one will be straight, level, plumb, square, on a real foundation, far stronger (modern framing practices are worlds better than old style, and I've only fixed what was broken), and designed from the ground up with fire protection, serviceability, maintenance, efficiency, and modern heating/cooling in mind, instead of having all those things scabbed on after the fact. I'll be starting another thread for it once this one has run its course.

Also, just got a call from the galvanizing shop... Ready for pickup :stare: those fuckers are fast.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

How does what the galvanizing shop do differ from spraying the part with that aerosol galvanization spray? Do they electroplate the zinc on or something like that? I assume it's a way more durable coating than the spray stuff.

GentlemanofLeisure
Aug 27, 2008


I actuallly work in coatings and corrosion. If the shop is doing a hot-dip galvanize, the metal piece is immersed in a vat of molten zinc in the 840* F temp range. This causes the zinc to alloy with the steel, which also reacts to the air, and forms a coating that protects the base steel. Spray applied zinc coatings also protect the metal underneath, but are more susceptible to mechanical damage exposing the underlying metal leading to local corrosion that can spread.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


GentlemanofLeisure posted:

I actuallly work in coatings and corrosion. If the shop is doing a hot-dip galvanize, the metal piece is immersed in a vat of molten zinc in the 840* F temp range. This causes the zinc to alloy with the steel, which also reacts to the air, and forms a coating that protects the base steel. Spray applied zinc coatings also protect the metal underneath, but are more susceptible to mechanical damage exposing the underlying metal leading to local corrosion that can spread.

Pretty much. I'm having it hot dip galvanized to G185. You pickle the metal in an acid bath to remove any remaining mill scale, light oxidation and minimal oil deposits, etc. Then dip in a flux solution IIRC? Then into a bath of molten zinc where the zinc alloys with the surface of the metal part, then lift it back out and let it cool off. The surface of the zinc oxidizes, then over time reacts with co2 in the air to form zinc carbonate which is more resistant to damage. The zinc also acts as a sacrificial anode for the steel in case fasteners break through the zinc coating and expose bare steel.

I looked into doing it myself in case I couldn't get it done cheaply because the first 2 shops I called wanted to charge me their 300+ dollar minimum job fee for like 1200lb of metal, but luckily the third shop I called was like "if you pay cash and don't care when it gets done, we'll toss it in with someone else's batch for 150 bucks" so I don't have to buy half a ton of zinc ingots to make a large enough zinc bath to galvanize one part.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009





Grimey Drawer

kastein posted:

"if you pay cash and don't care when it gets done, we'll toss it in with someone else's batch for 150 bucks"

That's always the good shop to find.

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