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Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


Just put up some structural drywall in the house of Theseus and call it good. :suicide:

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Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

I have no joke like 6 XJ bucket seats in the attic waiting to be turned into living room and home office furniture. The only downside is no armrests, and I can solve that pretty easily.

Also two super comfortable bench seats out of a ram 2500 van for couches.

And some old wheels and axleshafts to make coat trees out of.

And old differential and engine main/rod bearing caps to make drawer pulls with...

And half a house worth of wood to make bon fires with. . .

I'm sure there is other stuff I am forgetting.

Also, I spent last night installing an electric range outlet and electric range in my sister's new house for her, since she is recent-homebuyer housepoor and didn't feel like giving an electrician $900 to run 25' of 8-3/WG NM through a clean crawlspace, drop a 50A breaker and range outlet in, and plug the sucker in. In return she gave me the old stove.

quote:

<snip>We'll be able to cook without standing in the yard using a BBQ grill or microwaving/hot-plating things! :woop:

Now why would you want to do a silly thing like that??? Also, I'm assuming she gave you a gas stove, right?

kastein posted:

I ended up finding some free radiant design software from a company called Watts (IIRC) so I am giving that a try before I read a lot and learn the hard way. Thanks a ton though, that book tells me way more than I ever expected to learn.

We were using the old seats from a Roadmaster as bonfire seating but they kept digging into the ground and tipping over backward.

So I threw together a quick base for them. Need to mount a 6-pack holder in the middle ahead of the seats.


Next up: finish crossbracing in master bedroom floor.

I can't look at this picture without hearing dueling banjos, how far do you live from the nearest river? This picture does make me want to go find a junkyard to scavenge some seats from. . . or just buy another $50 Wal-mart special to dispose of in a couple years, it's practically a chair rental service.

Not Wolverine fucked around with this message at 15:13 on Oct 5, 2015

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


daslog posted:

The ladder I built for my treehouse when I was 10 was safer that that.
Seconding this ^.

If you read this thread expecting to not see a train wreck of OSHA violations and questionable financial decisions you're here for the wrong reasons. The only part I'm question is why were the two 4.0 engine blocks not a structural part of the design??? Keep up the good work Ken, A+ would read again.

EDIT

Totally TWISTED posted:

They aren't OSHA violations when it's DIY.
:golfclap:

Not Wolverine fucked around with this message at 16:21 on Nov 22, 2015

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

UPS is a bunch of miserable fuckholes and didn't bring me my PEX today as scheduled, but... the master bedroom wall is framed in! Holy poo poo even a picture for the first time in a dogs age.



The next few steps are rather entangled and I am going to have to think my way through them very carefully before starting because otherwise I will trap building materials in the wrong spot, or out of the right spot, or both.

Did you not cut the door opening in the sole plate of the wall? Are you cutting that later or what?

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

I'm definitely not doing laminate, for some reason it just didn't seem like a quality product, I'd liken it to using copper clad aluminum wiring.

My GF has nicknamed the house "the slanty shanty" due to it being so, uh, slanty, and right now, rather shantylike :v: The worst was when I discovered that a 5' tall exterior wall in the second floor was 1.5" from vertical... over 4'. Yeah, it's so far out of true that if it was a "horizontal" DWV, it'd have 50% more slope than required to meet code.

Attempting to level/square the place is a Sisyphean task, so I don't bother. Newly built walls and floors are made square and level within limits, if they need to meet a corner and not have a wonky triangular sliver, I'll make them slanty at each end to match the wall they're joining and blend it in between. All new openings and free standing walls / walls that are perpendicular to all existing walls are built as true/square as I can, however.

For example the new master bforoom floor I spent so long working on... is 2" higher at one side than the other. Why? Because the old floor it had to join seamlessly with is that slanty. So I leveled it in the other dimension (since it doesn't have to meet anything except a wall I rebuilt at the other end) but left it slanty in the dimension where it had to meet the existing floor.

You win some, you lose some.

Have you taken into account the slope of your floors for optimum water circulation patterns? :colbert:

Not Wolverine fucked around with this message at 02:15 on Feb 9, 2016

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

Wow I keep forgetting to post poo poo. Progress is slow due to the cold but I got the hall lights working yesterday while on vacation and the picky drywalling above the tie beams is almost half done. Once that is done I can really haul rear end because I won't have to do four loving picky cutouts on every 2x4 foot piece of sheetrock, I can just slap up nearly-full 4x8s.

Drywallin'

Is the plan to leave those beams exposed? Why is there an orange box above every beam?

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


Your Tyvek is upside down. Really, I know it means nothing, but I thought you sperged out on making sure the rest of the House of Theseus is perfect I assumed you would make sure the Tyvek logos were right side up and perfectly centered.

Serious question- are those locks actually going to be secure? I mean I know all locks can be picked by a pro (or an amateur who watched a YouTube video) but I thought mortise locks were significantlyeasier to pick than every other lock out there.

Not Wolverine fucked around with this message at 05:35 on Jan 16, 2017

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

one of my friends actually said the same thing and flipped my poor house upside down on Facebook :v:

I am not too worried about breakins, like you said. Doors are there to keep the wind and honest people out. There is a 2x3 glass window in the same door so anyone with a hammer has a key. Most people who can pick locks are used to yale type, warded locks (especially unlubricated ones like these) will require a lot more force on the pick. It also all happens far deeper in the door and is dirtier and more worn and crunchy.


The figure 8 in the handle, Corbin and Sxx stamped in are the best way. I would love some S24s or S6s if you find them but no obligation. E: the third pic in my last post is the best for this. S22s work too but I would prefer 24 or 6.
Fair enough point about the locks, I was more just wondering if there was something about the Corbin that made it more secure than the average mortise lock. That said, since we know this door requires a Corbin S24, does that many any goon in the area now knows exactly what key is necessary? Is there additional keying or does any S24 key work on any S24 lock?

Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


I have never built such a hatch, but I think a frame of aluminum brackets with a sheet of hardboard would be ideal. I think 1/2" aluminum angle stock would be rigid enough for that size and it could be just bolted or riveted together, and also be rust proof in case there was a leak or condensation problem. Similarly if there was a big leak someday, hardboard would reveal the leak versus the 70lb steel panel of doom that will hide the leak. Plywood would be a good option too, except I think it would be heavier than a hardboard and aluminum hatch, and it would hide leaks longer than hardboard.

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Not Wolverine
Jul 1, 2007

by Fluffdaddy


kastein posted:

I mean I can take it back off if one of you wants to buy it that way, sorry

Put the squirrels back in the wall and you've got a deal. :banjo:

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