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Galler
Jan 27, 2008



I'm trying to think of anyone who would want to break into a house and would actually use lockpicks to do it. I've only come up with law enforcement in very rare/specific circumstances. Crackheads will make their own door if they need to. Burglars will most likely just look for an open door/window and move onto an easier target if everything is locked up, but if they really want in they will just smash a window in the back or something. Home invasion types (or swat teams - more or less the same thing) will force their through the door. The FBI might pick a lock if they're doing surveillance but at that point I think the quality of your lock is the least of your worries.

Probably better off making your doors harder to kick in than caring too much about the quality of the lock*.


*Unless your lock can be opened with a bit of plastic and a pair of vise grips in a couple seconds. Then it might be worth caring.

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Galler
Jan 27, 2008



The house managed to stay house shaped despite missing large amounts of structural bits. Now that that's fixed I'm not sure anything could bring it down.

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



The command/living area for the Titan missile silos is/was a big steel structure inside a bunker with giant springs isolating the inner from the outer.

I'm pretty sure I remember reading about a tower in some earthquake prone area (might have been Japan) that also had a bunch of springs between the foundation and everything else to dampen the forces of an earthquake

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



Build two safe rooms. One you show off to everyone and one no one knows about.

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



I've done a fair amount of converting larger pieces of wood into smaller pieces without any issues up until a couple years ago. I did a fairly small amount of sanding on some red oak and woke up the following day feeling like I was getting the flu and it took a day or two to get back to feeling normal. I'm generally a fan of breathing protection but it was just 5-10 minutes of hand sanding so no big deal. Maybe I'm allergic to red oak (my first allergy!) but I now put on a mask whenever I'm doing anything that generates particulates even if it doesn't seem necessary.

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



It's not a failure it's an iterative design.

Make a super complicated hinge system that drops the panel down and slides it out of the way. Then update it to v3.x which will only occasionally maim the operator.

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



My realtor wanted furniture in my house when it was being sold but I was moving cross country and my poo poo was packed and loaded before the house went up for sale. I prefer looking at empty houses since it's harder to hide damage that way and I think it's easier to imagine how it will look with the furniture I want. Apparently most people do not think that way.

FilthyImp posted:

Reminds me of all those House Buyer shows where the couple lists off how it hits virtually all of their convoluted wants and is the cheapest but "eh... the color of that rug/cabinets... pass"
Those shows are fake. The buyers have already bought their house before the show starts filming. They tour the place they bought and two they don't care about and have to pretend it's a tough decision. I'm pretty sure some of them are like 'gently caress, why didn't we buy this one instead...uhhh, paint sucks, yeah, that's the reason.'

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



immoral_ posted:

If yer not careful, people are going to start mistaking this for a house.

Seriously, awesome work.

Yeah, I saw the first picture and my first thought was 'why is this here that's not Ken's house.'

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



Every time it's the same thing. Mudding and sanding over and over touching up every spot repeatedly after inspecting every square inch with a flashlight from multiple angles until the wall is glass smooth. Then you prime it and suddenly it looks like the surface of the moon. Then you fix all of that and paint and it's still hosed. It's no wonder most builders texture the walls.

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Galler
Jan 27, 2008



Have you tried a vacuum bag? I recently found out those exist for shop vacs and are supposed to handle dust better. I got a couple for mine but haven't started mudding yet so I don't know how well it works

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