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Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

I would definitely do that but I want to minimize the cuts and for that matter any kind of openings or seams in the sheathing to improve the insulation a bit. Worth the temporary pain.

You can buy fancy serious business european air sealing tape to have your cake and eat it too.

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Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Unfortunately Great Stuff is a pretty mediocre firestop.

For proper kastein overkill, you should insulate the wall cavities with dense pack cellulose. ~20% fire retardant by weight means it takes a very long time to burn through...

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


A garage can easily be done with basic rules of thumb and work well enough; it's a simple case with large thermal mass.

It's my understanding that some online stores that carry radiant heating parts will provide cheap/free design services if you buy parts from them, though I wouldn't be surprised if the quality of them is poor.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

Some squirrels decided that 3/4" sheathing is overrated and encroached too much on their nest so they made it into 1/4" sheathing.


:eng101: Squirrels, like all rodents, have a pair of continually growing incisor teeth. They need to chew on hard things frequently to wear them down and sharpen them.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


I'm gonna throw the SunRise Home out there, because I want to see the Kastein take on 5000 gallons of thermal storage and thermal shutters.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

And yeaah I went with 2x6 walls because of the higher strength and R value of a 5.5" cavity vs 3.5".

Good on you. A 2x6 wall with 24" centers is better than a 2x4 wall with 16" centers in pretty much every way. 2x4 exterior walls are for people who hate quality and common sense.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Enourmo posted:

But the 2x4s are cheaper!!!

In clear wall, the 24" OC spacing more than offsets the the cost of 2x6 lumber. In Kastein's nothing but windows and doors wall, then the spacing doesn't help so much, but labor savings can still make up for it.


kastein posted:

I was a bit fishy about framing the window with a single 2x6 header like that, but the original 2x4 wall was done that way and it held up for a century, and it's not in a weight bearing wall, so I figured it'd be fine. It was that or build something massively overkill.

IRC 602.7.3

quote:

Load-bearing headers are not required in interior or exterior nonbearing walls. A single flat 2-inch by 4-inch (51 mm by 102 mm) member may be used as a header in interior or exterior nonbearing walls for openings up to 8 feet (2438 mm) in width if the vertical distance to the parallel nailing surface above is not more than 24 inches (610 mm). For such nonbearing headers, no cripples or blocking are required above the header.

If your window were a couple inches higher, you wouldn't even need cripples for your single header, and you don't need the jack studs either (other than for nailing area for siding).

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

Please don't make me calculate thermal conductivities and poo poo like that to figure out which is better :psyboom: I'm curious now but not motivated enough to do so.

(it's the same equations as calculating the equivalent resistance/conductivity of a network of resistors)

Also, I really don't want to think about how bouncy the walls must be if you only have every other stud contacting them. If anything I'd go with two 2x4 walls back to back with a couple inches of airgap in between for high R value.

A staggered stud wall would typically have studs 12" OC, so the walls are supported 24" OC.

Including siding, fiberglass batts, clear wall 2x6 16" OC is about R-17.5, and 2x6 24"OC is about R-19. 8" wide staggered stud wall would be around R-25.

Motronic posted:

Yo dawg, I heard you like vapor barriers.

(seriously, there is no need - the whole point of Zip is not having to do that poo poo)

After all the rotted sills, I can understand why kastein might want to double up on water resistant barriers...

Putting the siding up with a vented rain screen would be more productive than Tyvek, though.


edit: oh yeah, the nice thing about innie windows is that they're sheltered from wind a bit, so they'll stay a bit warmer, which can cut down on condensation inside.

Zhentar fucked around with this message at 22:18 on Nov 11, 2015

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Potato Alley posted:

There's another huge benefit to staggered stud walls, though it's probably not as applicable here, but that's sound transmission. If the inner wall covering is attached to studs that the outer wall covering is not, then you have created an airgap inside the wall which will drastically reduce sound transmission through the wall. It's something I curse everyday not having in an open-plan, 70s-era, single-2x4-wall-construction-with-internal-walls-not-insulated house. Oh hey someone's using the toilet! Oh hey someone's listening to a piece of music every lyric of which I can hear from across the house! Sweet I was wondering what everyone else in the house was doing but now I don't have to.

In typical residential construction, there's not much point to doing more than filling the cavities with insulation, and then putting double drywall or resilient channels on one side. By that point, other construction details dominate the noise transmission (such as flanking paths through floor/ceiling cavities, air gaps from outlets, doors, HVAC ducts). In fact, unless your walls only used 3/8" drywall, it's probably already those other construction details behind your noise woes.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

It'd have to be a 4x4 one because the only way it's getting into the yard is via one of several ~15-20 degree dirt grades. I'll have to look into it, but I'm probably doing it tonight via An Assortment Of Hillrod Methods.

That's not exactly an unusual condition at construction sites. 4WD boom cranes and rough terrain scissor lifts are not uncommon, although with the tires they put on them, I wouldn't be surprised if even the 2WD ones can handle that.

They're not cheap, though. It looks like Hertz would rent me a rough terrain scissor lift for $230/day, plus who knows how much (I'm guessing $100-200) to deliver it and pick it up. They've also got manual personnel lifts for a mere $70/day - I don't know if those are even sufficient for installing a window, though.

kastein posted:

I just built that wall, I'm not piling bagged plaster debris against it.

Well what the hell is the point of overbuilding it like that if you're not going to take advantage of it!?

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


apatite posted:

My brother recently bought an old rear end house that has a toilet and sink under the stairway to the second floor. Code probably won't let you get away with cool space saving early 1900s tricks like that anymore :bahgawd:

I recently stayed in an old rear end house that also had a bathroom under the stairs... but it was a normal, decent sized bathroom with three or four stairs down to it.



If you're just sticking in a sink though, I think you can put one wherever you want. If you use a counter/vanity, your AHJ could consider it a wet bar and require typical kitchen counter outlet spacing, and you probably have to GFCI protect any outlets near it.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


That site is accurate, ordinary bamboo is regularly advertised as extremely durable thanks to janka hardness tests when it is in fact not remotely so, easily damaged by sharp pointy things like pebbles in shoes.

Strand woven bamboo is not ordinary bamboo. It's an engineered product, basically OSB made out of bamboo (with long strands instead of chips so that it looks pretty). The density of the bamboo fibers is much higher, and they're held to each other with adhesive. It's a vastly superior material for flooring than ordinary bamboo; much more durable, and much better dimensional stability. You do get the downside of engineered products: it's only as good as the quality of engineering that went into it. If they used a lovely glue that starts breaking down in 5 years, poo poo's gonna fall apart.

This site calls out some problems/installation concerns you can run into with strand woven bamboo.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Here, $750 boiler with built in buffer tank (using it for heating probably voids the warranty, though).

Have you done the math to see if you even need the above floor heat plates? I'm sure you do want them below floor, but with the insulating you've done, I wouldn't be surprised if they're unnecessary above floor (particularly for second floor rooms).

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

I already bought the furnace, and wanted a modulating, high efficiency one, so heehawing it with a water heater wasn't really a good option.

There are water heaters that can do that, too. They cost as much as a modulating boiler though, so you miss out on both the savings and the fun of heehawing.

kastein posted:

Abovefloor means significantly improved routing options - the routing I chose is completely impossible if done in joist bays.

Sorry, I worded that poorly; wasn't trying to suggest you switch to below floor. I was trying to say, have you done the math to see if you need the capacity of the higher quality thermofin plates? It very likely makes sense to get them for the below floor room, but the lovely brake bent plates may well be adequate for the above floor installs and would save you quite a bit if they are.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Vinyl is waterproof. It doesn't give a poo poo how wet it is. It's the adhesive that can fail and result in curling; the water tolerance of your install will be dependent upon which adhesive you use.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

I'd really like to avoid minisplits simply because I don't like how they look.

Aside from the ceiling cassettes tetrapyloctomy mentioned, there are also full on ducted cassette mini splits. It should still be smaller, cheaper, and more efficient than a standard air handler & split system.


If you really care about dehumidification, get a Daikin Quaternity. I believe it is the only residential system available with hot gas reheat (there are two coils in the air handler, so it can run as a true dehumidifier when cooling isn't needed).

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


The queen needs to nest in moist wood, to keep her eggs from drying out. The workers can handle the dry wood just fine, so they will indeed tunnel and nest elsewhere once they've had their way with the soft rotting stuff.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kastein posted:

Because 2" black steel pipe at HD is $9 a foot cut to length or $36 for 10ft lengths :sigh:

Fittings aren't cheap either. I think I paid 11 apiece for tees and like 8 or 9 for 90 degree elbows.

I think I'm going to have more into the piping than I do into the compressor, but that's only because I got it for free needing a new motor.

It is the kastein cycle:

":black101: hell yeah I'm going to turn 'doing it right' up to 11"

":homebrew: poo poo, turns out overkill is expensive"

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Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Hey, you can't win them all.


Going back a month or so to the hydronic heating chat, if the radiant floor isn't sufficient for your living room, you should be able to add in a panel radiator or fan coil for much less than the cost of adding in a high temperature zone.

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