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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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c355n4 posted:

I picture a tent with a propane stove in your dirt floor mud room. How far off is this?

No tent that I remember, but other than that, pretty accurate.

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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More multitool chat: Buy Bosch Carbide blades... expensive ($10 each on Amazon in a 2-pack), but hard to kill. Stu over at Toolguyd did an incredibly in-depth review with some custom setups and found the following:

"ToolGuyd" posted:

Bosch: N/A. The blade discussed here successfully cut through 20 nails with no signs of failure. None of the tested Bosch blades showed any signs of failure after 20 cuts.

Imperial: The blade shown and discussed here and in prior results failed on the 5th nail. Failure is typically observed between the 4th and 10th cuts.

Dewalt: The blade shown below failed on the 2nd nail. Failure is typically observed in the 1st or 2nd cut.
http://toolguyd.com/bosch-oscillating-multi-tool-blades-comparison-overview/ <-First page with info
http://toolguyd.com/oscillating-tool-metal-blade-best-durability/ <-seventh page with durability

And yes, he was sponsored by Bosch, but the results are eye-opening. The only thing that I've found will kill the carbide is plaster. I use a worn-out dull blade on it, and it works fine.
I've also work out a Dremel MultiMax, and now use a HF model. It's amazing.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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I love using a RAS. It does so many tasks, and doesn't demand to be in the middle of the shop like a table saw. That said, mine hasn't been used in several years, and my wife's Christmas present to me was a rigid table saw on a portable stand. Mine to her was a 10" sliding compound miter saw and stand. We're practical people.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Cakefool posted:

You definitely lose any small change or marbles you happened to drop in there :haw:

But gain the ease of installing a floor drain!

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Also not great quality, but this one:


One of those in slightly higher res:

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Have you checked out the Grundfos Alpha pumps? We just put in two of them, and they're pretty neat.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Antique keys, you say?


My father was a bit of a key nut. The big one is supposedly from the Catholic church he was forced to go to as a kid.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Amusingly, there's a similar window at my local Home Depot, $1000 down from $3200. It's green outside, natural wood inside. And odd sized.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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It looks like the kitchen is going to be heavier, with all that new wood. :v:

Keep up the good work. I'd suggest CAD for the triangles. Cardboard templates work wonders.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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A gas dryer? I've found them to be worse than electric, because the gas creates water when it burns. We've got a gas boiler, gas cooktop, electric wall oven, and electric dryer. It might be cheaper in energy costs to go with gas for the dryer, but we had one previously and it took longer than the electric, as didn't seem to get things as "dry", if you know what I mean.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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IOwnCalculus posted:

For those of us who don't have crawl spaces or basements or cast iron plumbing, what's not to code about that?

The Fernco fittings (rubber with 2 hose clamps) aren't up to code.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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I'm just happy that 99% of my house is blueboard and plaster. SO much stronger than drywall (I mean, it's basically concrete on the walls), and just as easily patched if you know what you're doing. And no sanding. It isn't hard to learn to do small stuff, but I leave big stuff to the professionals.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Blueboard is high quality drywall panels, just with a special coating on the paper to hold plaster. Skim coat plaster is awesome stuff. It totally bonds to the paper and hardens to be way harder than drywall compound, as it's not designed to ever be sanded. Drywall compound dries soft, so it can be sanded. Plus, unless you do a full skim-coat of compound on drywall, the outer surface is literally paper that you paint. Scuff the wall with a cardboard box in drywall? It'll mar the compound or tear the paper. Scuff a box on a plaster wall, it might scuff the paint, but won't touch the plaster at all. It's similar price to have it done, even though blueboard is more money than drywall, and plaster is more than joint compound. However, the labor is far less time-intensive. It requires a high level of skill, but a good plaster guy can work as fast as a drywall guy, without the need for drying time and multiple coats. And no sanding, so way less mess.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

Structurally sound: probably... 70-80%.
Structurally sound and correctly installed in structurally sound ways: maybe 50%.

And I didn't manage to get the door frame done in time, it's still held closed with that stack of scrap wood. Cutting and joining Ipe is a stone bitch. And I'm putting too much thought and not enough action into it.

Wear a mask when working with Ipe. I've built docks with it, and it's a total pain in the rear end. Carbide blades, and a box of drill bits... However, it's wicked hard and durable.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Slow is Fast posted:

ken actually had rear XJ quarter glass up against the house to keep animals out so structural XJ parts isn't too far of a departure.

And several XJs in the yard to house the animals. :v:

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Between heaven and hell.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Darchangel posted:

The GRK screws are the poo poo. The ones I used to build my shelves and workbench are amazing. They are self-drilling, have a second set of threads near the top to act like a ring-shank nail, *and* have serrations on the bottom of the head to not only help it to countersink, but also resist unscrewing. I don't think I split a single board using these things, thanks to the really effective self-drilling tip.
They also cost about twice as much as coarse drywall screws. I will keep said drywall screws handy for non-critical stuff, but I love those GRKs. Also, the ones I bought are T10 Torx, which drive *so* much better than Phillips.

I feel the same about Spax.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Plastik posted:

And Bob Vila hasn't actually done work on a home in one of his shows since the 90s. I don't know that I'd trust either of them. Maybe Adam Savage or Nick Offerman?

:lol:
Adam Savage is a genius mad scientist, but hardly on my list for someone I'd want doing permanent work. Temporary Halloween decorations or little shop fixtures/organization? Perfect. Building a set of stairs, Hell no.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Crunchy Black posted:

As someone pointed out upthread, you're an engineer...you're taking this purchase and have an understanding of the gravity of it WAYYYYY more than the average person.

:lol: this is totally true. Most home buyers are easily influenced by smells, fresh flowers, and clean, nicely arranged furniture. Higher end places often rent furniture for showings. Agents often bake cookies to make the house smell nice. And that poo poo works.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

pay 4 figures a month in shop rent.

Tell me about it. Thankfully, I'm making money with mine, but it's still rough writing that check every month. Plus gas, electric, internet, security, etc... It's too bad you're moving away, but WA is awesome. I've got some friends it that way that grow a lot of their own food, raise bees, cut their own timber, etc.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Yeah, I love chunky square baseboard. I think it's a timeless look and it's easy to clean, too.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Go full on wacko and go copper! Or cedar.


House looks amazing, such a change from the last time I was over.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

Yeah a lot of people get confused by that, even if they visit. In the summer we're surrounded by trees and you can really only see a few houses in that direction, the other 3 sides it's just trees. Then fall comes and you realize you can see half the town from here.

That is a new England specialty known as the triple-decker. It's a style of apartment construction that was common in the 1800s and early 1900s, typically each floor has 1 or 2 apartments in it. They were balloon framed and generally are in poor condition these days so they are firetraps.

Aka half of New Bedford and Fall River (and Springfield, Worcester, etc). They are awful places to live.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Wow man, that looks awesome. It reminds me of a friend's parents' place in WV. The railings really make the look.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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tomapot posted:

“Honey, why is the siding popping off?”

“The contractor says because the house is only being held up by sawdust and the walls are collapsing”

My carpenter was at my house yesterday replacing some trim and said he's doing a reno of a recently flipped raised ranch. There's vertical ship lap siding installed and the new owners want it changed. He said each 9' tall piece literally held on with 6x 3 penny 1 and a quarter inch box nails. He can grab the bottom of each board, stick the cats paw under it, pop the bottom 2 nails, and then peel the entire board off the house with one hand. Jesus gently caress people do poor quality work.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Looking good man. Hopefully the current housing bubble lasts long enough for you to get top dollar. Prices are crazy right now.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Jaguars! posted:

Yeah, I'm not sure it's wise to reject the most common form of guttering out of hand just because of one bad setup, though I don't know how well they cope in snowy climates.

New England is still mostly aluminum for a reason.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

I'm putting down a bunch of 16x16 patio pavers for the laundry machines.

Concrete is absolutely not in the budget, nor in the schedule. The next owner can do that, I'll sell for less if I have to. I wanted to but... Eh. There is a big walk-out door on the downhill side of the basement that you can get a wheelbarrow through easily so the truck can back down the road, wheelbarrow from there 100% downhill to the basement, then uphill unloaded back to the truck.

And yes, that's a laundry hookup not a vent.

Pump truck, done. Wheelbarrows are for suckers.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

I mean, you've been to my place. It's a looooong way from the nearest place to park a concrete truck to the basement door, can a pump truck actually move it that far? I guess it's still downhill.

Yup. They can pump hundreds of feet, and downhill makes it easier. Hell, they could probably do it with a regular truck and a long chute. A buddy works for a concrete pumping company. It's amazing what they can do.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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I'm amazed you didn't cut the stud and box in a support to center the vent.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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kastein posted:

Ceiling in the bathroom is primed and painted
Walls are primed. One more coat tomorrow and I can start the floor, just bought all the underlayment and mastic stuff to do that. Hoping to get it done by end of week, we'll see if that happens. It's my first tile project ever and I was a dumbass ten years ago and bought 12in tile for it so this is going to be a trial by fire.

I laid 12x24 as my first time job earlier this year. A leveling system is super helpful. Ours came out... Ok. I leveled the floor before I put down the ditra heat, but that hosed up the level enough to cause issues for the tile. I could do a much better job if I did it again. I'm sure you know, but dry-lay and label everything ahead of time.

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sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

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Ken: want to know a special kind of grout hell? Try using roughened tile and learning halfway through that it's tearing the float apart, leaving little blue! eraser-style rubbings in the loving grout. I spent hours picking them out of the grout lines, smoothing them out, and then hating the shrinkage. And this was using dry grout, mixed correctly.

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