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The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Leperflesh posted:

I am totally unprepared to do the math, but I suspect that an electromagnet powerful enough to extract nails consistently would be larger than your kitchen doorways, and cost like a hundred grand.

And if they were electromagnets, you'd need one hell of an electric service pulled into your house!

Sir, please explain to us why you need a 2000a 480v service pulled into your single family home....

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The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

It was in the corner behind the brick pile with a huge amount of scrapmetal stacked up next to it :v:

I don't know if any quality pictures exist of it. It was "built" using fenceposts and non pressure treated 2x6s, not a single post or beam was straight, level, or square. It rested on 4 post-base cement blocks, with no floor. It was poorly triangulated with haphazardly nailed on 2x4s and the roof joists (flat roof) were random chunks of 2x6 and 2x4 patched together into a sort of grid. The roof was 3/4 plywood and they never even put all of it on, and the walls were T1-11 siding, nailed, stapled, and drywall screwed onto the posts and beams, bulging over the crossbracing. In some places the siding went 3 inches into the ground, in other places it was 6" above ground at one end of a wall and 18" above ground at the other end. The back wall was never even sided at all because they realized they built it against a tree only after finishing the rest, so it was more of a 3 wall shanty with half a roof.

I always planned on knocking it down when the house was done, but we ended up killing it yesterday.

I so wish you had pictures of this, it sounds amazing.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Amstrad posted:

My thoughts exactly. Who ever heard of running compressed air service outside like a water faucet?

Almost anyone who has ever had to deal with running airlines outside to work on their cars in the driveway? Plumbing air to various spots in a garage is awesome, but if I didn't have a garage, something in the carport would still be pretty awesome.

I have both a cold and a hot water spigot on my patio. :v:

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Right place, right time. Sometimes it's good to just be lucky! Going to look nice.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






As a reference point, the minimum allowable SEER rating for a new A/C unit in Arizona is 13. So if the law there is the same, the unit you are looking at is the least efficient unit that is legal to sell currently. Also the cheapest, since as that number increases, so does the price!

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Doesn't the condenser (or whatever the radiator thingie is) in the air handler have to be stronger in a heat pump since the pressures are much higher when it's in heating mode? I had to replace one a few years ago because it failed during the winter, and the tech told me that it was common for them to fail in the winter due to the higher pressures compared to when they were in cooling mode.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






ExplodingSims posted:

That would be the Evaporator you're thinking of! :eng101:

And as far as I know, the Evap in air handlers are pretty universal, and can be used interchangeably. Now the issue might have been, especially if it was a newer evap, that it was made out of aluminum. Most manufacturers seem to be having trouble figuring out how to properly make and join aluminum tubes.

Thanks. No idea what it was made of, but it was only about 9 years old at the time and had corroded at the bottom of the "V" shape, likely at the joins where the two halves connect together, so certainly could have been exactly what you are talking about with poor manufacturing.

The cost of a new evaporator installed was only a couple hundred less than an entire new air handler, which is crazy. But now I've got a 2 1/2 year old air handler so hopefully nothing in it will fail for a while.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Gas heat is certainly more efficient than electric from a cost standpoint, but it never gets cold enough here to justify the expense of a gas/electric installation when a heat pump can handle the winters here without any problem at all. Also with gas you have to deal with the hazards of carbon monoxide poisoning and of course the whole 'have to have gas' thing, and a fairly low percentage of the communities here actually have access to natural gas and the city codes generally won't allow large tank installations in tightly packed suburbia.

If I was building my own place and had gas available, I would at a minimum have gas cooking and clothes dryer. Not 100% sure on a furnace, just because I'm not sure it could ever pay for itself with the energy savings over the life of the unit when the electric bills in the winter are already very low, especially with solar and net metering (I am basically at a minimum possible bill for 4 or 5 months of the year, racking up credits for when it gets hot).

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Some good looking work there. I enjoy watching your home come together.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Leperflesh posted:

Did you put a secret message for the future into that void under the bay window before sealing it up?

Also, why is it OK to still use real actual lead? I'd have thought given lead paint is banned that it'd be not allowed to use just hunks of lead on buildings but a quick google shows it's still sold all over the place.

Pretty unlikely that a toddler is going to be up there licking on it, unlike interior paint. Also it's not going to flake off as it ages like paint does.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

Water main still AWOL, debating buying a pipe locator to hunt for it.

Do a search for local private "Underground Utility Locators". If it's an iron pipe (or any conductive metal) one of them should be able to come out, connect to the pipe at your house and use their machine to locate it from there. Be a lot cheaper than buying your own machine for a one-time use (assuming you are talking about the same kind of machine that I used when I did this type of work).

That type of thing usually is really lovely to locate, but if you get a solid locate from your house for a dozen feet, and then another one from the meter towards your house, you should have a pretty good idea of whether it's a straight line between them from that point.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

The locator, I always wondered what your username meant until literally a few days ago :v: I was looking at 160 dollar chinesium ones on Amazon, I only have to trace the pipe about 5 to 8 feet from the house to be sure it doesn't go under any of my new footing locations. And the water meter is right inside the foundation so I figure I can connect it to the ground rod 15ft away and the pipe going down into the ground and probably pick up a half decent signal for at least that far.

Didn't know they could be had for so cheap - the ones I used (it's been about 10 years ago now) were deep into the thousands, but of course they were meant to be used constantly all day every day.

Might be able to get a private locator to come out for a simple locate like that for cheaper, but I suppose it depends on whether you think you might have a use for it in the future.

Some water pipes are absolutely terrible at carrying a signal, so locating them can be pretty iffy. One thing you can try if you can't get a signal on it by connecting to the pipe, is to shut the water off at the meter/street, drain the pipe and get access at the house, and insert a metal fish-tape into the pipe and put the signal on that. It will be crappy because it's inside the pipe, but depending on the pipe it might be better than trying to push a signal down the actual pipe itself, especially if you are going through a fitting or two on the pipe.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

It's clearly a crappy unit, don't get me wrong. They don't appear to have the multiple large receive windings that pro grade 4-figure units have. But I'm willing to maybe give it a shot and if it doesn't work well enough to find a pipe single-digit feet from where the signal generator is connected, file a return. We shall see.

Interesting trick with the fish tape. I believe it's soft annealed copper tubing for a ways but not sure.

If it's copper then even a cheap unit should get a great signal, although if it's direct buried the copper will be grounding the signal making it ugly also. The fish tape trick was something we used mostly for non-metallic pipes and conduits, but it's something else to try on metal water pipes. The biggest issue with metal water pipes is that the joints typically don't conduct the signal worth a drat, so it's really difficult to get a signal to go very far. If you crank the power up on the transmitter enough to push past a few joints, the signal will bleed onto everything in the ground and give you all kinds of false positives, making that type of pipe pretty much impossible to locate beyond 10'-30'. Since the metal is typically directly touching the ground, it's really tough to get a clear signal on it since the signal is going to ground along the entire pipe instead of just the far end like a good cable/wire locate.

When a city locator is marking water lines (and sewers) they don't even bother with a machine, everything is located based on measurements from the as-built plans from known points on the line like valves or manholes.

Good luck!

Edit: another important point that I forgot. If you don't isolate the end of the pipe you are locating from, anything that's connected to it that conducts will also carry the signal and possibly cause all kinds of problems locating the line. The first thing we would do when locating a buried telephone/cable/fiber line was to disconnect the ground sheath/tracer from the ground at the point being connected to. You want the first ground to be as far from the connection point as possible in order to make the signal make a big loop through the cable/pipe to the other end where it's grounded, and then back through the ground to your ground rod. Not something you can really do with a metal pipe buried in the ground.

The Locator fucked around with this message at 03:49 on Aug 14, 2019

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

Yeah it's direct buried and that's gonna suck. I am not sure if I can disconnect it at the meter without cutting the tamperproof wire seal on the meter, which clearly I don't want to do. There's a ground rod about 15 feet away perpendicular to the pipe that I can use, and can temporarily disconnect the house wiring ground from the main.

Debating just having a pro do it.

Just FYI, even with a pro, that kind of a locate can be iffy at best. Sometimes they locate great, other times it's just impossible to get a clean signal, and there's no way to predict which one it will be.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






I am so damned lazy compared to you. Nice work.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:


Pulled the old windows out of this wall a few days ago and put the housewrap up. Got the windows in today.


Never stop the Improv.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






kastein posted:

It won't be a true tiny house. I'm guessing we'll end up around 600 to 800 square feet on a 20x20 foundation, just feels small coming from a 1400sf house and growing up in like a 2400sf house.

Purely out of curiosity, since you are building for yourself on what seems to be a fairly large chunk of land, why are you going so small? Nothing wrong with small, but I have to admit if I was given the ability to design my own place I'd have a few extra rooms for specific things just.. because! A hobby room, a computer room, a library... etc...

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Good looking floor!

I'm an Arizona native so I have no idea what these heat strip things are. :v:

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






mcgreenvegtables posted:

Not putting on gutters--even if you don't actually need them-- sounds like the fastest way possible to trigger a buyer's home inspector.

Is that an Eastern US/Regional thing? Out here in the Phoenix area, it's really rare for a house to have gutters, and when they do, it's normally something that an owner has added, not the builder.

The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






Place is really looking great. Congrats on nearing the finish line and good luck getting a premium price for all your work.

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The Locator
Sep 12, 2004

Out here, everything hurts.






sharkytm posted:

My carpenter was at my house yesterday replacing some trim and said he's doing a reno of a recently flipped raised ranch. There's vertical ship lap siding installed and the new owners want it changed. He said each 9' tall piece literally held on with 6x 3 penny 1 and a quarter inch box nails. He can grab the bottom of each board, stick the cats paw under it, pop the bottom 2 nails, and then peel the entire board off the house with one hand. Jesus gently caress people do poor quality work.

Sounds like a design feature for easy remodeling!

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