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daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

OP: out of curiosity, what kind of insulation was in those walls, if any?

kastein posted:

Bagster

Just a fair warning to anyone else thinking to use a Bagster:

If you're doing a one or two small room complete gut and renovate, Bagster is indeed cheaper than a dumpster. If you're doing a whole house gut, or at least more than 500 sq ft, get the dumpster.

I initially thought two Bagsters would be enough to handle the debris from 8 rooms 1300 sq ft, based on the math from the back of the bag. One Bagster got filled to the brim immediately with the debris from one bedroom. Back they went to the store, and I rented the second biggest dumpster Waste Management had.

You're right, though, Bagsters are a lot more convenient than a dumpster. I paid extra to have my dumpster for two weeks, spent every waking hour that wasn't at work frantically shoveling debris in it, and I still went over the "default" weight limit by 1.5 tons (another +$100). Altogether, it was under $500, but if I had stuck to using the Bagsters, it would have been a lot more.

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daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Cakefool posted:

I've never seen crossbracing like this before, is it common? What issue does it solve?

Old floor = squeaky floor. Cross-braces = less squeaky floor. Then the cross-braces get loose over time and contribute to the squeaky floor problem...

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

Thanks! Definitely will do that.

I determined after some youtube surfing that I am going about this demolition project all wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln92EPDCHVA

Well, that certainly would have shaved weeks off my demolition...

According to the comments, he only got one hole in a tire. Not bad.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

no way... lath won't do anything close to that. Hell, I could take two studs with all the lath still attached and either rip the studs off 4 feet worth of lath at a time just by twisting them, or scissor fold it to the point that it'd fit through a window.

After spending many days tearing out an entire house full of plaster and lathe bit by bit (attached to studs, which did not come out), may I just say I hate you so much right now?

What's "nogging"? Is it anything like a firestop (staggered 2x4's in between studs to prevent fires from rising so quickly)?

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

it took that long? It took me like one day to demolish each room (and that's a bit of an overstatement - I generally had most of it done by around lunchtime, but ran out of energy after that), the only real time consuming part is shoveling the debris up. Holy hell I hate shoveling plaster.

If it takes that long - you're either being way more careful than you need to be, or your plaster is a lot more tenacious. Mine was old horsehair, so all I had to do was use a wrecking bar. Punch one hole to start, then just sorta peel it away from the studs working from top to bottom and let the plaster fall off as you go. Some of my kitchen was redone at some point with more modern plaster that I suspect contained plaster of paris, it was fairly hard and I had to smack the debris with the wrecking bar to make the plaster actually break free from the lath.

I don't waste any time with detail till I'm done - usually spend a few hours knocking most of the lath down with the plaster on it, then put down the wrecking bar, grab the cats paw and go back around removing any remnants, fragments, lath tacks that didn't come out, etc. Then I shovel it all up and go back over it again with a shopvac to pick up any piles of debris stuck in corners.

My house was built in the late 1880s, probably, and it shows. The lathes were clearly made by hand, hand-nailed across 3 studs, and the plaster was an inch thick in places. It was bad enough that I was using a sawzall just to break up the plaster enough to get a hold of each lathe to pull it off the nails. Some places, I got lucky enough to be able to use a sledgehammer, but even then, it'd just bounce off the thicker plaster sometimes.

Also not helping was layers of paint over wallpaper over drywall over stick-on wallpaper from the 70s over glued-on wallpaper from the 30s over that plaster and lathe. Some rooms even had wood panelling over/under all that. I've been meaning to re-measure my rooms and see if I gained square footage just from removing the built-up walls. I bet you $5 I did.

It's done now, but ye gods, I'm never doing that again.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

e: I ran the numbers and the flooring I want to use is going to run me around $800-900 per room, unless I overestimated. Holy hell, I guess I'm walking on 3/4 CDX for a while.

Just FYI, living on subflooring for awhile, especially with pets, will gather sawdust- and dust-bunny tumbleweeds and various pieces of metal and wire and dropped screws that somehow fuse to the floor when you try to sweep them up, requiring you to go around and physically pick them all up one by one.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

iv46vi posted:

I'm actually kinda curious as to what goes inside house inspector's mind. Would you highlight some things in the picture?

I'm not an electrician at all, but I learned a lot from my buddy who was adamant about teaching me WHY he's doing things the way he's doing them on my complete gut and renovate.



The big things that stand out is that the wire is wrapping around the outside of the stud (green circle). You hang the drywall, you're going to have wavy distorted drywall at best, and at worst puncture that wire. Wire goes inside holes drilled through the studs and they need to be stapled to the side of the stud so they're not sagging (red circle) or crossing multiple studs like that diagonally black circle around the running wire, meaning you run the risk of poking a nail/screw through the drywall and surprise, wire! There's also no strike plate to protect any of the wiring that is stapled to the corner studs (green circle again).

Good wiring:

(sorry for the tiny picture, it's the first one I found off GIS that incorporated strike plate, drill through stud, and run in a straight line)

Stapling the wire to the studs:


edit: e;fb twice but I have pictures

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

I vote for #3 (notching studs isn't THAT bad nor unstable, but you can always add another sistered stud if you're worried about strength), followed by #7 but be very careful with load-bearing walls like that. #6 for comedy option, let the next poor sap deal with the subsequent drinking problems and "who the gently caress built this thing".

kastein posted:

I don't know what the hell I'm gonna do about this yet, I need to stare at it and mutter and drink for a while. And contemplate killing every known descendant of the morons who built and maintained this god drat shack.

This is exactly what I was doing while gutting my house. You've just articulated it much better with a whole lot less swearing. :P

Do never buy. Do never renovate.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Ferremit posted:

Going on the sparks flying off your chainsaw, you need to get some of this stuff http://www.stihlusa.com/products/chain-saws/specialty-saw-chains/rdr/

I pulled down a tin and timber shed and it cost me a chain and a half from all the nails and dirt in the timber.


And you give Australia poo poo? At least the ANTS DONT EAT YOUR HOUSE over here. Termites will tho, But Not the god drat ants!



poo poo like that sucks when you step on it in the roof of a house. Especially when the place has 12' ceilings cos that landings gonna hurt!

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

I don't know what's holding it up right now because it sure as poo poo isn't the frame.

Pixie dust?

That's horrible and also

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Do you have permits to do any of this? I mean, how is your house not, like, condemned?

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Nth-ing "do it right or don't bother".

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

gently caress you ants, termites, mold, water, and anything else. Your move.



This is what I imagine you're doing right now.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

Beach Bum posted:

Kastein Home remodelingconstruction, where the question "Can I finish this job before I bleed out?" is a lot more common than it should be.

While gutting and renovating my House (and it's certainly house-with-a-capital-H), I joke that every time we work, House requires its requisite blood sacrifice and it doesn't care who "donates". Every time we work on the house, somebody is getting a new bump/scrape/bruise and it is going to bleed. Every single time, no exceptions.

My House is one vindictive bastard.

daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

angryrobots posted:

Reuse, recycle, right?

You forgot the "reduce" part, which is arguably the most important part.

Also, Craigslist + 'free' = one (wo)man's trash is another (wo)man's treasure.

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daggerdragon
Jan 22, 2006

My titan engine can kick your titan engine's ass.

kastein posted:

Wow, that sucks! I've been debating doing air conditioning for the 3 bedrooms but haven't decided for sure yet.

I'm leaning toward using some sort of vinyl, wood, or engineered laminate in the kitchen at this point. I hate how obnoxious tile installation is and I don't like dropping a glass or plate to be a guaranteed shattered glass or plate and maybe a chipped tile too, and I love how wood floors look. Need to discuss this with the GF before making solid plans, though. Can't decide if the cabinets should go over the flooring that way either, but guessing it'd be fine.

I have laminate in the kitchen. I now also have a wide thick cushioned rug in front of the sink/dishwasher part of the "kitchen triangle" because:
  • water will eventually slop its way over from doing dishes/mis-pouring pasta/spoons that do this/what have you and if you're not careful to immediately sop it up, it'll work its way in between the laminate boards and swell up at the edges ever so slightly
  • I've fumbled and dropped a soap-slippery crockpot more than once. The first time it left a bowl-shaped dent in the laminate wood, but now that the rug is in place, it just makes for a damp rug.
One con to think about : if you need to replace a damaged board(s) and the board(s) are at the "beginning" where you started interlocking them, you have to tear out the entire floor to replace the damaged boards, then rebuild the entire floor.

Engineered laminate is supposed to be more water-resistant, so you might want to consider that in the kitchen and cheap out on the rest of the house with regular laminate wood.

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