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Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

Getting into prehistoric cultures is great because without any written history it's harder to find out the objectionable things they did or believed. I love the Jomon and Natufians especially.

Does anyone have any links to articles about that recently uncovered prehistoric European battle where people had traveled very far to fight?

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Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Patrick Wyman's podcast Tides of History is starting on prehistory soon, if anybody dropped out of it because the early modern is kinda boring.

euphronius
Feb 18, 2009





Arglebargle III posted:

4th century BC Celtic:



Gilt bronze and red enamel

Humans were so awesome

Steely Dad
Jul 29, 2006



Grand Fromage posted:

Patrick Wyman's podcast Tides of History is starting on prehistory soon, if anybody dropped out of it because the early modern is kinda boring.

I blame him, not the early modern. He was so much more knowledgeable about late antiquity than the early modern that his podcast went from fascinating depth to shallow surveys mixed with interviews of domain experts who were often pretty dry and boring. I hope he ups his game with prehistory.

Also I assume you were just trolling Hegel

LingcodKilla
Dec 28, 2002

I ate too much crab and transformed into this.


Lead sticks to magnets?

Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010








Grimey Drawer

Grand Fromage posted:

Patrick Wyman's podcast Tides of History is starting on prehistory soon, if anybody dropped out of it because the early modern is kinda boring.

I wonder if he's gonna tackle gobelki tepe

HEY GUNS
Oct 11, 2012

In the 17th century, the Holy Roman Empire was ravaged by the Thirty Years' War. In the middle of this chaos appeared a Japanese mercenary named Isaak. His fierce battle begins!


Steely Dad posted:

I blame him, not the early modern. He was so much more knowledgeable about late antiquity than the early modern that his podcast went from fascinating depth to shallow surveys mixed with interviews of domain experts who were often pretty dry and boring. I hope he ups his game with prehistory.

Also I assume you were just trolling Hegel

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Steely Dad posted:

Also I assume you were just trolling Hegel

I would never do such a thing, how dare you.

Grevling
Dec 18, 2016



Early moden history is cool but I'm hyped for Wyman's prehistory series. That's something you rarely get good pop history works about. I read some science journalist's book about prehistoric migrations but it came across as really self-absorbed and had some annoying niggling mistakes that I noticed.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

Grand Fromage posted:

Patrick Wyman's podcast Tides of History is starting on prehistory soon, if anybody dropped out of it because the early modern is kinda boring.

Not to be a hater, but:

Slim Jim Pickens
Jan 16, 2012


Early Modern is only boring if you're reading old old style history where they try to lay down the events and it seems like barely anything gets done. It owns when you read about society and you learn that it was pretty normal that Johann Sebastian Bach was almost strangled to death by a music student because he called the bassoonist an "old goat".

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





euphronius posted:

Humans were so awesome

why do you say, "were"? it's not like ancients were saintly or that moderns are especially evil or violent, I mean, that's a hat made to protect someone's head while they're killing people

like the horrors of the third reich vastly overshadow those of the first, and in the span of a handful of years; but dollars to donuts if ancient Rome had 20th century German tech they would have made Hitler look like Mr Rogers

Fuligin
Oct 27, 2010


The Civilization of Europe in the Renaissance by John Hale might be my favorite history book and i heartily recommend it

I think i've jammed in 'book recs' mode

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Peanut Butler posted:


like the horrors of the third reich vastly overshadow those of the first, and in the span of a handful of years; but dollars to donuts if ancient Rome had 20th century German tech they would have made Hitler look like Mr Rogers

Caesar would absolutely have nuked Gaul and then defecated on the radioactive waste. While laughing.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





he would laugh all the way through the radiation poisoning, too, letting out some quip on his death bed about how it was worth it

also what did romans call whatever fried dough thing they made? wanna be able to punch up that dollars to donuts to 'denarii and [roman donuts]' next time

skasion
Feb 13, 2012

Why don't you perform zazen, facing a wall?


Caesar would have saved his nukes for his political rivals. you canít sell radioactive corpses into slavery or take incinerated political elites on as clients.

sbaldrick
Jul 19, 2006
Driven by Hate


Grand Fromage posted:

Patrick Wyman's podcast Tides of History is starting on prehistory soon, if anybody dropped out of it because the early modern is kinda boring.

I admit I only started listening to Tides of History but he doesn't seem to remotely have the skill to try a public history run at pre-history.

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






skasion posted:

Caesar would have saved his nukes for his political rivals. you canít sell radioactive corpses into slavery or take incinerated political elites on as clients.

Germany would've been completely hosed though.

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Re-listening to the most recent Fall of Civilizations has made me want to hear words about Chinese History spoken at my ears.

Which of The History of China and The China History Podcast is the better of the two (or are they both poo poo)?

Schadenboner fucked around with this message at 13:18 on May 23, 2020

Communist Walrus
Aug 31, 2001

I don't mind taking charity,
From those that I despise.

skasion posted:

Caesar would have saved his nukes for his political rivals. you can’t sell radioactive corpses into slavery or take incinerated political elites on as clients.

This is just Dune

Jazerus
May 24, 2011



maybe i'm a fool but i don't think hypothetical mechanized atomic romans would have nuked anybody but carthage. maybe the parthians.

assuming they kept the codes locked up away from the literally insane emperors anyway

carthage would have been extremely hosed tho

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Jazerus posted:

maybe i'm a fool but i don't think hypothetical mechanized atomic romans would have nuked anybody but carthage. maybe the parthians.

assuming they kept the codes locked up away from the literally insane emperors anyway

carthage would have been extremely hosed tho

Sow the fields with Cesium Salts.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



Schadenboner posted:

Re-listening to the most recent Fall of Civilizations has made me want to hear words about Chinese History spoken at my ears.

Which of The History of China and The China History Podcast is the better of the two (or are they both poo poo)?

China History Podcast is pretty good but he is a real 中国通 and thus often has to travel to China to manage businesses in Ningbo for large stints. He also has a strong interest in 19th and 20th century social history, which means a lot of episodes on cities, people, business, and everyday life in the late Qing Dynasty and the Republican period. He's not an emperors and battles guy. He's been making episodes for ten years so there's a lot of content.

History of China I've never listened to.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH





Arglebargle III fucked around with this message at 15:04 on May 23, 2020

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

Jazerus posted:

maybe i'm a fool but i don't think hypothetical mechanized atomic romans would have nuked anybody but carthage. maybe the parthians.

assuming they kept the codes locked up away from the literally insane emperors anyway

carthage would have been extremely hosed tho

Romans would probably give the nuclear codes to a high religious official. Of course, the Emperor would have them as high priest.

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Arglebargle III posted:

He also has a strong interest in 19th and 20th century social history, which means a lot of episodes on cities, people, business, and everyday life in the late Qing Dynasty and the Republican period.

Does he do teh Taiping Rebellion?

(Which, shamefully, I'm only really aware of because there's a Flashman book about him being tremendously racist to the Chinese [rather than/in addition to] to [Indians/Afghans/Africans/Native Americans]).

Schadenboner fucked around with this message at 15:13 on May 23, 2020

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Schadenboner posted:

Re-listening to the most recent Fall of Civilizations has made me want to hear words about Chinese History spoken at my ears.

Which of The History of China and The China History Podcast is the better of the two (or are they both poo poo)?

History of China is good if you want a start to finish narrative history.

China History Podcast jumps around topics to whatever he feels like at the time. I got bored of it a while back and dropped out but wouldn't dissuade anyone, I listened to like 200 eps before that.

So they're both good, depends what you're looking for.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



I think the Taiping Rebellion is really interesting because later propaganda from around the globe has tried to cram it into various narratives like unwashed clothes that won't go in the suitcase. It never quite fits because the Taipings were an expression of inchoate hatred for the existing governmental and social order. Whoever is in power later and trying to tell the story can't quite co-opt the Taipings because the Taipings would happily have put their heads on spikes too. But at the same time they can't condemn them because the failure and humiliation of the late Qing Dynasty is a foundation myth for every subsequent Chinese state.

European narratives, whether sympathetic or antagonistic to colonialism, can't fit the Taipings because a) the Taiping rebellion was a much larger event than the European incursions at the same time and European history doesn't know what to think about that and b) they hated the Chinese government just as much as they hated the foreigners.

And then there's the bizarre stuff that nobody even attempts to fit in, like the Christian syncretic character of the nascent Taiping state. It usually gets mentioned as a curiosity and then tossed aside.

To answer the question yes, he did a series on the Taiping Rebellion as it spiraled from literal fever dream to emerging state to imploding theocracy.

Arglebargle III fucked around with this message at 15:32 on May 23, 2020

Synnr
Dec 29, 2009



That is super cool. Is it a separated salty lake now, or is there some connection still under all that?

SlothfulCobra
Mar 27, 2011

STOP BEING EVIL.


Alhazred posted:

Caesar would absolutely have nuked Gaul and then defecated on the radioactive waste. While laughing.

It depends how much nuking the land would affect its resale value. Caesar's not gonna pawn off some radioactive trash on his veterans. He probably would've used mustard gas and napalm carpetbombing though.

skasion posted:

Caesar would have saved his nukes for his political rivals. you can’t sell radioactive corpses into slavery or take incinerated political elites on as clients.

Caesar for all his faults, was notoriously lenient on his political enemies compared to all of Rome's other strongman dictators, and he sure as hell wouldn't have wiped out the city that he was trying to charm and conquer just to quiet his enemies. He showed no such restraint when wiping out villages in Gaul that may have had nebulous connections to rebels against his rule though.

Mark Antony on the other hand, totally would've nuked Rome in a second.

KiteAuraan
Aug 5, 2014

JER GEDDA FERDA RADDA ARA!





This reminds me that I still need to read "Tears of Re" since it gets into the technological aspects and artifacts of Ancient Egyptian apiculture. Sounds right up my material culture alley.

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Jazerus posted:

maybe i'm a fool but i don't think hypothetical mechanized atomic romans would have nuked anybody but carthage. maybe the parthians.


"They make a radioactive wasteland and call it peace"

Epicurius
Apr 10, 2010


College Slice

SlothfulCobra posted:

Caesar for all his faults, was notoriously lenient on his political enemies compared to all of Rome's other strongman dictators

That was part of why his enemies hated him so much. The idea that Caesar would show mercy to and pardon his enemies was seen as evidence that he thought of himself as a king.

Cast_No_Shadow
Jun 8, 2010

The Republic of Luna Equestria is a huge, socially progressive nation, notable for its punitive income tax rates. Its compassionate, cynical population of 714m are ruled with an iron fist by the dictatorship government, which ensures that no-one outside the party gets too rich.



Epicurius posted:

That was part of why his enemies hated him so much. The idea that Caesar would show mercy to and pardon his enemies was seen as evidence that he thought of himself as a king.

Seems like he couldn't win at that point.

Mercy = "look at him doling out the mercy, he thinks himself a king"

Murder them all = "See we told you, he's a brutal tyrant looking to make himself king"

Dante
Feb 8, 2003



What are some other podcast except Tides of History that is good? I strongly prefer history podcast that drops the theater play fantasy reimaginations and focuses on academic work (no Carlin).

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

Dante posted:

What are some other podcast except Tides of History that is good? I strongly prefer history podcast that drops the theater play fantasy reimaginations and focuses on academic work (no Carlin).

Fall of Civilizations is p.-to-v.deece. Not sure if it's going to be academic enough but IIRC the guy has a PhD?

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



I've been enjoying The French History Podcast. I've just arrived at Caesar and while he's not down in the dirt with the archaeologists, he does talk about archaeology and material culture and written sources a lot.

Nessus
Dec 22, 2003

I still can't believe they cast Spock as me. Spock! Can you imagine?

Of course, he was missing a few things.



Cast_No_Shadow posted:

Seems like he couldn't win at that point.

Mercy = "look at him doling out the mercy, he thinks himself a king"

Murder them all = "See we told you, he's a brutal tyrant looking to make himself king"
Osores amet odio

CommunityEdition
May 1, 2009


When Diplomacy Fails is an excellent one to put on in the background, because 85 episodes of the Versailles conference is just too much to binge. He does do the reimagining as well (see: the 20 hours of audience Versailles conference role play that ran in parallel), but itís generally contained to its own skippable episodes.

Out of the comedy history podcasts, I might cheat and pick Saga Thing. Icelandic family sagas are kind of history, right? I like that neither of the presenters are the dumb one who gets information thrown at him to react to, so instead itís two beardy professors giving each other poo poo for going on digressions.

Thereís tons of listenable history podcast, but in terms of academia those are the two where I can recall there being actual crossover between the presenterís academic publications and the podcast

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Falukorv
Jun 23, 2013


Grevling posted:

Early moden history is cool but I'm hyped for Wyman's prehistory series. That's something you rarely get good pop history works about. I read some science journalist's book about prehistoric migrations but it came across as really self-absorbed and had some annoying niggling mistakes that I noticed.

The one written by Karin Bojs? If so, what were its annoying mistakes? Cuious as i got that book as a gift but havent come around to read it yet.

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