Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«920 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Nothingtoseehere
Nov 11, 2010



Dante posted:

What are some other podcast except Tides of History that is good? I strongly prefer history podcast that drops the theater play fantasy reimaginations and focuses on academic work (no Carlin).

Revolutions is all about the liberal revolutions [from English Civil War to Russian Revolution] and is done by Mike Duncan, the guy who did the History of Rome podcast so it hits the ground running with a podcaster who knows what he's doing.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

euphronius
Feb 18, 2009





Russia isn’t a liberal revolution

Jeb Bush 2012
Apr 4, 2007

A mathematician, like a painter or poet, is a maker of patterns. If his patterns are more permanent than theirs, it is because they are made with ideas.

euphronius posted:

Russia isn’t a liberal revolution

he's only partway through russia so technically he still has the option of stopping after the february revolution

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Dante posted:

What are some other podcast except Tides of History that is good? I strongly prefer history podcast that drops the theater play fantasy reimaginations and focuses on academic work (no Carlin).

I am currently subscribed to:

History of Japan
History of Persia (have not started yet)
Byzantium & Friends (this is the most heavily academic one on the list)
The History of Egypt
The Dollop (not academic, comedy history)
Our Fake History (have not started yet)
The History of China
Lions Led by Donkeys (comedy military history)
The History of Byzantium
Revolutions
The Partial Historians
Wonders of the World
Fall of Civilizations
Revolutions
Inward Empire

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



euphronius posted:

Russia isn’t a liberal revolution

Bakunin aktivated

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Cast_No_Shadow posted:

Seems like he couldn't win at that point.

Mercy = "look at him doling out the mercy, he thinks himself a king"

Murder them all = "See we told you, he's a brutal tyrant looking to make himself king"

"Fine! I guess I'll just make myself a king then!"

Fuligin
Oct 27, 2010


Dante posted:

What are some other podcast except Tides of History that is good? I strongly prefer history podcast that drops the theater play fantasy reimaginations and focuses on academic work (no Carlin).

The History of Egypt podcast is exactly what you are looking for

FAUXTON
Jun 2, 2005

daef





Fuligin posted:

The History of Egypt podcast is exactly what you are looking for

History of Egypt's like one of my all-time favorite podcasts

Steely Dad
Jul 29, 2006



British History Podcast is up to just before the Norman Conquest. He did a great job of early Medieval Britain, but new episodes seem to be coming a lot more slowly lately.

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

CommunityEdition posted:

When Diplomacy Fails is an excellent one to put on in the background, because 85 episodes of the Versailles conference is just too much to binge.

Piker.

CommunityEdition
May 1, 2009


Steely Dad posted:

British History Podcast is up to just before the Norman Conquest. He did a great job of early Medieval Britain, but new episodes seem to be coming a lot more slowly lately.

Not that that’ll be an immediate problem for a new listener, 348 episodes in and he’s only at the 1020’s.

HEY GUNS
Oct 11, 2012

In the 17th century, the Holy Roman Empire was ravaged by the Thirty Years' War. In the middle of this chaos appeared a Japanese mercenary named Isaak. His fierce battle begins!



yes, what?

Dante
Feb 8, 2003



Thanks for all the great tips!

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH





Ruins of Merv in modern-day Turkmenistan. The city of ~500,000 was sacked by the Mongols in the 13th century and depopulated. The area was completely abandoned by the early 19th century.



11th century Seljuk citadel wall.

Grevling
Dec 18, 2016



Falukorv posted:

The one written by Karin Bojs? If so, what were its annoying mistakes? Cuious as i got that book as a gift but havent come around to read it yet.

Yeah, exactly that one! I can't remember any specifics right now but the one that made me give up was when she was imagining being on Cyprus 10,000 BC, hearing people speak and thinking it sounds vaguely like Basque. That was so stupid to me I didn't feel like reading on.

Zudgemud
Mar 1, 2009


Grimey Drawer






This is currently located in a really posh neighbourhood but when I visited the place in 2007 it looked like a dump without almost any mentioning of it's origin and no tourists.

Zopotantor
Feb 24, 2013

...und ist er drin dann lassen wir ihn niemals wieder raus...

Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

he's only partway through russia so technically he still has the option of stopping after the february revolution

He did stop after the revolution of 1905.

Because he needs to finish his book on Lafayette, he'll start again in the fall hopefully.

Mr Luxury Yacht
Apr 16, 2012




Yeah the first eight episodes of the season were a background on the history of communism and anarchism and a primer on their founders and philosophies. He's 100% continuing through 1917 and beyond once his break is over.

Unfortunately he's also said that'll be the end of the podcast

VanSandman
Feb 16, 2011
SWAP.AVI EXCHANGER

Mr Luxury Yacht posted:

Yeah the first eight episodes of the season were a background on the history of communism and anarchism and a primer on their founders and philosophies. He's 100% continuing through 1917 and beyond once his break is over.

Unfortunately he's also said that'll be the end of the podcast

I'd pay for him to do Cuba.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



Revolutions Podcast has been running for five years, I think he should be allowed to do something else. There's very little chance he leaves podcasting IMO.

Podcasting took him out of a basement in rural Wisconsin and to a globe-hopping book-signing-tour New-York-Times-bestselling pop history career, I think he'll stick around.

ThatBasqueGuy
Feb 14, 2013

someone introduce jojo to lazyb




Disappointed he doesn't double the overall length of the series trying to capture the last 200 years of Chinese history tbh

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH





Pre-Imperial mold for Half-Tael "Ban Liang" coins.



Han Dynasty Ban Liang coin. The text says Ban Liang, which is the nominal mass of the coin: half a tael.



In the early Han dynasty the Ban Liang was overtaken in circulation by the lighter Five Zhu "Wu Zhu" coin. One zhu is 1/24 of a liang, so that the wu zhu coin is nominally worth 5/12 a ban liang coin.



The wu zhu would continue to be minted in large volumes and serve as the coin of everyday transaction until the early 7th century when the Tang Dynasty began minting a different coin.

If you've ever wondered why there's a hole in ancient Chinese coins, I couldn't tell you who first came up with it but it was used to string round numbers of coins together for larger transactions. For example a peasant paying yearly taxes might pay in grain or if he was doing better convert three strings of 100 copper cash to a weight of silver. Imperial tax payments were typically transacted in kind or in silver but not in copper cash, which became a serious monetary problem in the late Imperial Period.

Arglebargle III fucked around with this message at 16:10 on May 24, 2020

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?




Arglebargle III posted:

Revolutions Podcast has been running for five years, I think he should be allowed to do something else. There's very little chance he leaves podcasting IMO.

Podcasting took him out of a basement in rural Wisconsin and to a globe-hopping book-signing-tour New-York-Times-bestselling pop history career, I think he'll stick around.

He's said he has ideas for the next podcast, he hasn't decided what it will be yet but he's definitely going to do another one.

Brawnfire
Jul 13, 2004

Come play my CYOA!

Save your reality from the Constructors... then save all the rest of them.



I'm no expert, but aren't they conflating the Parisii of Gaul and the Parisi of the Yorkshire area? Or are the spellings mutable?

Silver2195
Apr 4, 2012


Brawnfire posted:

I'm no expert, but aren't they conflating the Parisii of Gaul and the Parisi of the Yorkshire area? Or are the spellings mutable?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parisii_(Gaul)

The spellings of the ones in Gaul are apparently mutable. Caesar spelled it Parisii, Pliny spelled it Parisi, and Strabo and Ptolemy used the Greek form Parisioi. I think the ancient sources use Parisi exclusively for the ones in Yorkshire, though. They were probably related anyway.

Brawnfire
Jul 13, 2004

Come play my CYOA!

Save your reality from the Constructors... then save all the rest of them.


Haha, I tried to link the wiki articles but they got messed up like yours did... I couldn't fix it so I left it out.

Thanks for the prompt response! Wiki said they were unrelated but that seemed odd to me

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH





Tomb of an Egyptian palace official responsible for sacred and temporal palace banquets.







24th century BC.

I want to know how they made the bread so tall.

Arglebargle III fucked around with this message at 23:25 on May 24, 2020

Silver2195
Apr 4, 2012


Brawnfire posted:

Haha, I tried to link the wiki articles but they got messed up like yours did... I couldn't fix it so I left it out.

Thanks for the prompt response! Wiki said they were unrelated but that seemed odd to me

Actually, the wiki says they may have been related: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parisi_(Yorkshire)

quote:

Burials in East Yorkshire dating from the pre-Roman Iron Age are distinguished as those of the Arras Culture,[10] and show differences from surrounding areas, generally lacking grave goods, but chariot burials and burials with swords are known,[5] but are similar (chariot burials) to those ascribed to the La Tène culture of areas of western and central Europe, giving a potential link to the similarly named Parisii of Gaul.[1]

SlothfulCobra
Mar 27, 2011

STOP BEING EVIL.


I heard somewhere recently that while Caesar was governor of Illyria, using their legions to conquer Gaul, the province got raided a bunch while it was undefended. Is there somewhere to learn more about that?

When I heard it, it seemed like another point in the column for Caesar being mainly beelining building up his own power with no regard to anybody else and only pragmatically allying with reformers.

Brawnfire posted:

Haha, I tried to link the wiki articles but they got messed up like yours did... I couldn't fix it so I left it out.

Thanks for the prompt response! Wiki said they were unrelated but that seemed odd to me

What you need to do is take the bbcode into your own hands and move the tags around manually. A number of automatic linking systems just kinda screw up when there's parentheses, so you just gotta do it yourself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parisii_(Gaul)

I've actually got into the habit of just doing text links by just going ctrl+U and adding the rest of the tag manually.

Mad Hamish
Jun 15, 2008

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.




Arglebargle III posted:



Tomb of an Egyptian palace official responsible for sacred and temporal palace banquets.







24th century BC.

I want to know how they made the bread so tall.

I believe it was baked in a conical pot.

Koramei
Nov 11, 2011

I just pretend to be nice.


Lipstick Apathy

Arglebargle III posted:

If you've ever wondered why there's a hole in ancient Chinese coins, I couldn't tell you who first came up with it but it was used to string round numbers of coins together for larger transactions. For example a peasant paying yearly taxes might pay in grain or if he was doing better convert three strings of 100 copper cash to a weight of silver. Imperial tax payments were typically transacted in kind or in silver but not in copper cash, which became a serious monetary problem in the late Imperial Period.

This is funny, I was just readin an Ask Historians post about this a couple of days ago: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistori...d_hole/fr4icnl/

According to that the strings arose later; the holes are actually because of the way the coins are made. Unlike western coins which are struck with a hammer into a mold to make the imprints, Chinese coins are cast (with molds like the one in the first image), but this means sharp metal flash seeps out around the seam between the two halves of the mold, making the coins really uncomfortable to handle. So, they lathe the edges of them until they're smooth--the hole is where the lathe rod goes to let them do that.

Squalid
Nov 4, 2008



Koramei posted:

This is funny, I was just readin an Ask Historians post about this a couple of days ago: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistori...d_hole/fr4icnl/

According to that the strings arose later; the holes are actually because of the way the coins are made. Unlike western coins which are struck with a hammer into a mold to make the imprints, Chinese coins are cast (with molds like the one in the first image), but this means sharp metal flash seeps out around the seam between the two halves of the mold, making the coins really uncomfortable to handle. So, they lathe the edges of them until they're smooth--the hole is where the lathe rod goes to let them do that.

that's interesting. do you know what the mold in the picture is made from? It almost looks stone or something. presumably it can handle hot metal temperatures but I really can't tell looking at it.

Also, what this about conical bread?

Grevling
Dec 18, 2016



That guy who made bread using Ancient Egyptian yeast who was making the rounds earlier reenacted the way they baked bread in the Old Kingdom using a conical clay mould.

quote:

According to Dr. Love, commoner foods of the Old Kingdom included beer, pulses, and onions (“they were much sweeter than ours, you could eat them like apples,” she says), but nothing was more ubiquitous than bread. Blackley, having studied hieroglyphics, says ancient Egyptians actually had 176 words for it. If they were big on baking, however, they were less insistent on clear recipes, relying mostly on oral transmission of instructions. As such, Dr. Love had to synthesize data from ancient art, writing, and archaeology to decode their baking methods.

Her work showed that Egyptians placed their dough into a heated, conical, clay pot called a bedja before burying it in a hole surrounded by hot embers, a process Blackley made it his mission to reenact to perfection. “The guy’s mind runs at 100 miles per hour,” says Dr. Love, “but he’s very methodical. I knew it would work.”

quote:

He estimates that he cooked about 75 loaves before building his own bedja by hand and digging a hole in his backyard to master underground baking. “If I hadn’t spent so much time working on it, it would have been a wreck,” says Blackley. “I would have been another one of those people posting a lovely, burned, flat loaf saying, ‘Welp I guess this is what the ancient Egyptians had to deal with!’” Instead, Blackley’s backyard loaf proved exceptional, if not for one minor hiccup. “I was freaking out because I burned the top,” says Blackley. “But in the end, I realized the process of figuring out how to bake like them was really what got me so close to these people I respect so much, not the end product.” From the ancient yeast to the underground baking method, Blackley had at long last produced an indisputably ancient loaf with the same rich sweetness as his summer sourdough.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articl...t-egyptians-eat

Pics in the article.

Brawnfire
Jul 13, 2004

Come play my CYOA!

Save your reality from the Constructors... then save all the rest of them.


Silver2195 posted:

Actually, the wiki says they may have been related: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parisi_(Yorkshire)

Ah! I'm poo poo at BBCode *and* research alike! Thanks for drawing my eyes to this.

Scarodactyl
Oct 22, 2015




“It was unbelievably emotional for me,” says Blackley. “I stan Egypt.”



I remember seeing a video about something like this in middle school, but iirc it was Mesopotamian.

The famed Urukian Beveled Rim Bowls (probably the first mass-produced item in human history) might have been used similarly from some quick reading. That makes more sense to me than rations being given in raw barley.

Scarodactyl fucked around with this message at 08:25 on May 25, 2020

CommunityEdition
May 1, 2009


Does producing apparently valid results push him from “dweeb” to “eccentric”?

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH



No he's rich. It's that.

Arglebargle III
Feb 21, 2006


MY GIMMICK IS POSTING GIBBERISH





Roman abstract mosaic art. 4th century AD or earlier, Leptis Magna.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Edgar Allen Ho
Apr 3, 2017



Arglebargle III posted:

No he's rich. It's that.

Can I simultaneously love/hate it?

On the one hand, obviously his rich rear end can do whatever he wants

On the other, ancient Egypt and the ancient Andes are what made kid me think history was cool, and reading modern egyptian scholarship is a huge part of why I abandoned a good career to try and eventually be a history person.

I also loving love cooking and especially the history of how our modern foods came about so ugh

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«920 »