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denereal visease
Nov 27, 2002

"Research your own experience. Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own."

Based on some discussion over here about patterning boards, and knowing that more than a couple posters have ranges/pits/whatevers for shooting at home, I thought there might be some interest in a DIY thread where we can talk about our projects. Also, I figured it might be a way to give something back a little bit; this forum has been & continues to be a phenomenal mentor in the year plus journey from thinking "I want a gun & I want to be proficient with it" to actually picking one out & picking it up.

I got motivated to make "custom" targets to use for a birthday. I have an interest in HD/SD, so I knew I wanted to start getting trigger time shooting silhouettes. I have a bit of experience stenciling, and I prefer not spending money to get things I could make myself, so a few of my interests converged yesterday & I spent a few hours dicking around. The only item I had to buy was butcher paper, and if we assume 18" sheets for silhouettes & that we are only making silhouettes, the cost per target is about 0.06 U$D; I considered the time investment negligible because it was for a friend's birthday & I definitely enjoyed myself throughout. I'm going to start listing the various of my proces for making DIY silhouettes (shout out to Parts Kit for helping me find USPSA specs).

1) Mise en place: Make sure you have all your poo poo. Not pictured are cans of spray paint, a pair of disposable gloves, the enormous roll of butcher paper (3'x800') & a broken down cardboard box that I cut my template from. You can see where I added a couple dimensions to the USPSA specs because math


2) Planning & Sketching: To save time, I decided not to give this fellow an octagonal body. The end products won't be used as competition targets so they didn't have to be exact, but I wanted them to be pretty similar in case I decide to pursue competitive shooting in the future. This is going to be a "negative" stencil, that is we'll be using the overspray to define our borders. The boxes marked with X's are going to be cut out in the next step. I labeled that one area "watch out" because I didn't want to draw out my whole stencil then have the absence of cardboard right there gently caress me over, all I had to do was scribble that out & it got hard copied into my short term.


3) Cutting: Just what it sounds like. I used a carpet knife in conjunction with a T Square to make straight lines. The cardboard was pretty legit, so I had to make most of the cuts twice or three times to go through. The exacto/scalpel is better for cutting thin stuff (paper, transparency film, etc.) or for doing detail work. Here's how it came out.


3.5) Portioning: Since I was making more than one, I had to cut some sheets off my roll of butcher paper. Again, since it's not going to be used in competition I rough cut them to 16-18" wide & since the paper was so inexpensive I wasn't worried about maximizing my return on it. No pictures for this step.

4) Set up for painting: The hard part is over, and we're done cutting so at this point I started drinking. Get everything you'll need into your well ventilated work area. Figure out where & how you're going to store these as they dry. Usually, we want to use some masking tape or other adhesive when we're stenciling, so I've included a picture of how I chose to try to secure the template to my paper. The whole idea is trying to hold the template tight to the paper so that you get a clean stencil, so if you have a complicated stencil or one with small areas you might want to use more tape. Unsticking the template ended up being a pain in the rear end, so I quickly said gently caress that & took the tape off.




5) Paint & Repeat: I don't have in process picture, but if you need one just keep huffing the paint at this point. The overspray defines the robot torso well enough, and the boxes I cut out earlier are now "hit boxes" if you will. Since I was going to churn these out, I put on the disposable gloves at this point just to make cleaning myself up easier. All I had to do was spray one, move the stencil to the next piece of paper, and repeat; this works fine if you have the floor/work space to lay out all the poo poo you intend to stencil. If you truck over to the shotgun thread, I'm about to post some of these with patterns on them later tonight.


And there you have it! If you've been following along at home, you know have at least one robot silhouette for pewpew fun time. In the future, I plan on making some bull's eye style targets for rifle shooting. Once you've gotten some experience & with a little bit of creativity, well...


...let's just say that magic is never too far away.

denereal visease fucked around with this message at 18:49 on Jun 11, 2012

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Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Cheapass targets:
Of note is butcher paper can be bought in about 1000' rolls for about $30 on amazon.com, and it's eligible for free shipping!
http://www.amazon.com/Boardwalk-BUT...s=butcher+paper
http://www.amazon.com/Boardwalk-KFT24301000-Length-Width-Kraft/dp/B004NEW94O/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1339373698&sr=8-4&keywords=butcher+paper

The 18" could be used to directly make silhouettes, and the 24" could be used to make "pasters" to make a clean target over a USPSA cardboard target (which if it's already shot up some you might be able to get for free). Then just make a stencil, spray paint, and go shoot Batman or something.

The standards for USPSA targets are available in the competition rules, appendix B. Should be a pdf of them somewhere.

PVC stands:

I don't have any good photos of my stand, but it was really easy to make. You'll need 3 10 foot lengths of PVC pipe 3/4" or larger, 6 90 degree bends, two couplings, two T couplers, and something to cut the PVC with. Cut all of the 10 foot lengths into 2.5 foot lengths and then you'll be ready to assemble. All you do is use the T couplers and 4 of the 90 degree bends to make the base with 6 of the lengths, and then what's left to make the stand and top. You should also have one extra length of pipe left, which is nice in case one of your friends hits the stand. It takes a few minutes to set up and take down, but this is a really easy stand to transport, and great for those of us with tiny cars.

If you want to shoot silhouettes you can use two cut lengths and couplers to bring to stand up to about 5 feet tall, if you're shooting rifles from a bench you can always just use one length for each leg and drop it down to about 2.5 feet tall.

If you want to get extra fancy you can drill 1/4" holes into some of your PVC so you can run string to clip targets to. An alternate might be to use a small saw to cut shallow notches in the outside of the stand so that the string just has something to grab onto.

Not a cheapass target, but fun anyways:
If your range bands wire stands or whatever you can still shoot the polymer targets by putting them on a string on the PVC stand. I drilled a 1/4" hole in one of these and it's fun as hell to get it swinging around with a .22. The gophers and gong should be able to just directly hang on a string once you get the base off.

briefcasefullof
Sep 25, 2004
[This Space for Rent]

Parts Kit posted:


PVC stands:

I don't have any good photos of my stand, but it was really easy to make. You'll need 3 10 foot lengths of PVC pipe 3/4" or larger, 6 90 degree bends, two couplings, two T couplers, and something to cut the PVC with. Cut all of the 10 foot lengths into 2.5 foot lengths and then you'll be ready to assemble. All you do is use the T couplers and 4 of the 90 degree bends to make the base with 6 of the lengths, and then what's left to make the stand and top. You should also have one extra length of pipe left, which is nice in case one of your friends hits the stand. It takes a few minutes to set up and take down, but this is a really easy stand to transport, and great for those of us with tiny cars.

If you want to shoot silhouettes you can use two cut lengths and couplers to bring to stand up to about 5 feet tall, if you're shooting rifles from a bench you can always just use one length for each leg and drop it down to about 2.5 feet tall.

If you want to get extra fancy you can drill 1/4" holes into some of your PVC so you can run string to clip targets to. An alternate might be to use a small saw to cut shallow notches in the outside of the stand so that the string just has something to grab onto.

These PVC stands are the handiest loving things to make ever. They are super cheap and great for shooting outdoors. Though, they seem to break kinda easily. However, rather than using PVC to make vertical pieces to bring the stand up to 5 feet, use furring strips. They're like 75 cents a piece at Lowes, making it no big deal if they get shot.


I also like the idea someone mentioned before (UncleCaveman? Kommiensuzcuntbear?) of using a similar setup with some wire mesh (i.e. screen door screening) and a bucket to make a brass collector for semi-autos. Just set beside you and let the screen funnel into a bucket and you've got a handy brass catcher. Haven't done this yet as I've not shot outdoors since like last year, but it sounds handy as hell.

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



Cool I was just thinking of a project. I'm soon going to have access to a great machine shop and was thinking of trying to build one of those dueling posts they Have on Top Shot where the targets flip from red to blue as you shoot them. The two biggest challenges I see are what thickness does a steel target need to be and how to design the hinge. Once I get, access to the campus network I'll start drawing things up in CAD and post progress.

denereal visease
Nov 27, 2002

"Research your own experience. Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own."

QuarkMartial posted:

brass collector
We just laid down a drop cloth today, and it was about 50/50 on whether or not hulls would land on it, but we were firing from a standing position or a kneeling rest-your-elbow-on-your-knee. Seemed like it would kick 4 out to the side and one at a 45* angle. The drop cloth was almost no help for catching .223 & 7.62 brass though, maybe 30% tops landed on it.

That sounds like a really good idea for shooting from a bench though, I dig it.

IGotMine
Feb 12, 2009


Does anyone else see the face on god in the center of that robot's chest?

I'm assuming it's god. It could also be a butterfly or a vagina or something, I was never any good at these.

I've sort of been wondering what exactly makes for hardy target material - seeing that polymer target makes me curious as to what middle ground there is between paying for a manufactured target like that built to withstand a bunch of hits and just shooting trash and littering the range. Anyone have any experience with making something a little more resilient than paper targets that avoids the mess that such targets seem to lend themselves to?

Kennebago
Nov 12, 2007

van de schande is bevrijd
hij die met walkuren rijd


IGotMine posted:

Anyone have any experience with making something a little more resilient than paper targets that avoids the mess that such targets seem to lend themselves to?

Paper plates seem to make less mess. If you make a 3" diameter circle stamp or something you can make good-size bull targets that hold up a little better than paper for like $2 a stack. I use them a lot for my .22 pistol.

It's not DIY but those self-sealing targets seem to hold up pretty well, too. I used one for a couple hundred rounds this past weekend and it didn't leave any bits behind. Could be DIY if you make a PVC base for them - I'm going to do that, my range floor is not great for holding stakes in place.

Kommienzuspadt
Apr 28, 2004

U like it


3x5 notecards are good for practicing more precise shots with handguns at 10-15yd

Kommienzuspadt
Apr 28, 2004

U like it


Whoa who gave me this custom title? I didn't even post anything offensive in recent memory

denereal visease
Nov 27, 2002

"Research your own experience. Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own."

Hahaha, I did not notice that before & had to take a few looks to spot it. There are a few of these in the shotgun thread, but here's what they look like after they've been shot up.

PsychoBilly Caddy
Dec 2, 2005
You might say I picked it up at the factory. It's cheaper that way.

Kommienzuspadt posted:

Whoa who gave me this custom title? I didn't even post anything offensive in recent memory

Probably just some rear end in a top hat in the drunk girl shooting thread in GBS.

One Legged Ninja
Sep 19, 2007
Feared by shoe salesmen. Defeated by chest-high walls.

Fun Shoe

Mishra posted:

Cool I was just thinking of a project. I'm soon going to have access to a great machine shop and was thinking of trying to build one of those dueling posts they Have on Top Shot where the targets flip from red to blue as you shoot them. The two biggest challenges I see are what thickness does a steel target need to be and how to design the hinge. Once I get, access to the campus network I'll start drawing things up in CAD and post progress.

If you're using centerfire pistol, any mild steel less than 3/8" will probably bend like crazy after a while. 22lr can be 1/8"-3/16", or more, if you test it and get it to swing reliably. Centerfire rifle will wreck mild steel for the most part, but most people don't duel with rifles.

For the hinge, just tilt the whole assembly towards you. The bullets will splatter mostly down into the ground, and gravity will reset the target to one side or another. Protect the hinge itself with something like a piece of angle iron down the length of the vertical, so the bullets don't ding it and pinch it in one position. As to the actual hinge itself, the simpler, the better. If I ever get around to building mine, I'm just going to use a piece of 1/2" or so black iron pipe a few inches long over a rod with a washer welded on to hold it at the right height.

Just remember that the bullets are trying to smash this thing to bits in rapid succession, and eventually they'll probably win. Build it tough, but keep in mind that you'll have to fix or rebuild it some day anyway, as well as carry it to the range, so make it easy to take apart.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


QuarkMartial posted:

These PVC stands are the handiest loving things to make ever. They are super cheap and great for shooting outdoors. Though, they seem to break kinda easily. However, rather than using PVC to make vertical pieces to bring the stand up to 5 feet, use furring strips. They're like 75 cents a piece at Lowes, making it no big deal if they get shot.
Yeah that is the one major downside. If you do hit it it just takes a huge chunk out of the pipe. Furring strips sounds like a great idea.

IGotMine posted:

Anyone have any experience with making something a little more resilient than paper targets that avoids the mess that such targets seem to lend themselves to?
Pizza boxes make pretty good targets or something to staple paper targets to. You can even hang them on wire or string by opening them and then closing the back over the wire. Probably don't want to hold onto them for more than a week though since they tend to soak up pizza grease.

ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

I have been reusing shot up USPSA targets leftover from matches and covering the shot up parts with brown masking tape I get from the 3M plants clearance sales for 20 cents a roll. I guess that all relies on the availability of hilariously cheap masking tape.

3M also donated 500,000 sets of earplugs and a hardware store gives us weed killer and other lawn care poo poo to our range, so it never hurts to ask local businesses for freebies if you have an actual range.

Bigass Moth
Mar 6, 2004

I joined the #RXT REVOLUTION.

he knows...


QuarkMartial posted:

These PVC stands are the handiest loving things to make ever. They are super cheap and great for shooting outdoors. Though, they seem to break kinda easily. However, rather than using PVC to make vertical pieces to bring the stand up to 5 feet, use furring strips. They're like 75 cents a piece at Lowes, making it no big deal if they get shot.


I also like the idea someone mentioned before (UncleCaveman? Kommiensuzcuntbear?) of using a similar setup with some wire mesh (i.e. screen door screening) and a bucket to make a brass collector for semi-autos. Just set beside you and let the screen funnel into a bucket and you've got a handy brass catcher. Haven't done this yet as I've not shot outdoors since like last year, but it sounds handy as hell.

I do the PVC stand and it works really well. I have been using Tomato stakes, but they are more expensive than furring strips, so I will look into trying those instead.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



How to make your own sandbag for shooting or whatever:

1) find a pair of old pants that you're about ready to throw away. Ideally blue jeans, but anything of a suitably thick/tough material would work.

2) Cut a section of one of the legs that is about 5 inches longer than you want the eventual bag to be. There shouldn't be any holes in this section either, for obvious reasons. If there are I've had good luck with applying a cheap iron-on patch to the inside of the leg.

3) Apply the heaviest-duty fabric glue you can find to 2 inches of one of the ends. Use waterproof glue. Roll the fabric up over the glue, so you end up with a round roll of glue/fabric/glue/fabric layers.

4) after that sets up enough that it doesn't want to unroll on you, get a needle and thread. Heavy duty twine or fishing line is pretty ideal. Basically, just don't use some bullshit cotton thread. Use a really basic, circular stitch to reinforce the glue job. I tend to like it pulled fairly tight.

5) let this set up for at least an hour or so. Then, fill the pant leg with as much sand (or dried beans or rice or whatever you like as a filler) as you figure is appropriate.

6) seal up the other end the same way you did the first one.

Boom, shooting rest for a grand total of about $10 plus a worn out pair of pants, assuming that you have none of the required materials already. In my experience you can get about 4 bags out of a pair of pants in decent condition.

If you really want to get ambitious, you can make a v-shaped shooting rest using the crotch of the pants. That's a bit more advanced, but the basic principles are the same. WIth one of those you'll want to stuff it with significantly more sand to make the rest firmer.

Uncle Caveman
Jun 16, 2006

I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am.


QuarkMartial posted:

I also like the idea someone mentioned before (UncleCaveman?) of using a similar setup with some wire mesh (i.e. screen door screening) and a bucket to make a brass collector for semi-autos. Just set beside you and let the screen funnel into a bucket and you've got a handy brass catcher. Haven't done this yet as I've not shot outdoors since like last year, but it sounds handy as hell.
Yeah, basically this:



I've made a fullsize (6'x3') for use while standing and a smaller one (2'x2' to mount on the edge of a bench. They are very handy for not having to hunt down brass. Just go to any hardware store that sells lumber and get a handful of 1x2" furring strips, they are cheap and don't have to be perfectly straight. For a freestanding one I like to make a PVC base as described above so it's easier to take down. You can get fancy and funnel the bottom edge to a bucket or just fold it up like an envelope or whatever.

Be sure to leave a bit of slack in the screen though, or it'll just bounce the brass right back at you.

Uncle Caveman fucked around with this message at 23:12 on Jun 11, 2012

Skippy
Jan 24, 2002

"Bastard Son of Icyfang..."

Cyrano4747 posted:

How to make your own sandbag for shooting or whatever:

1) find a pair of old pants that you're about ready to throw away. Ideally blue jeans, but anything of a suitably thick/tough material would work.

2) Cut a section of one of the legs that is about 5 inches longer than you want the eventual bag to be. There shouldn't be any holes in this section either, for obvious reasons. If there are I've had good luck with applying a cheap iron-on patch to the inside of the leg.

3) Apply the heaviest-duty fabric glue you can find to 2 inches of one of the ends. Use waterproof glue. Roll the fabric up over the glue, so you end up with a round roll of glue/fabric/glue/fabric layers.

4) after that sets up enough that it doesn't want to unroll on you, get a needle and thread. Heavy duty twine or fishing line is pretty ideal. Basically, just don't use some bullshit cotton thread. Use a really basic, circular stitch to reinforce the glue job. I tend to like it pulled fairly tight.

5) let this set up for at least an hour or so. Then, fill the pant leg with as much sand (or dried beans or rice or whatever you like as a filler) as you figure is appropriate.

6) seal up the other end the same way you did the first one.

Boom, shooting rest for a grand total of about $10 plus a worn out pair of pants, assuming that you have none of the required materials already. In my experience you can get about 4 bags out of a pair of pants in decent condition.

If you really want to get ambitious, you can make a v-shaped shooting rest using the crotch of the pants. That's a bit more advanced, but the basic principles are the same. WIth one of those you'll want to stuff it with significantly more sand to make the rest firmer.

Only you could turn the sentence "Cut the leg off a pair of pants, fill it with sand and then stitch it closed..." into a verbose 6-step process with two follow-up paragraphs for clarification.

Skippy fucked around with this message at 23:32 on Jun 11, 2012

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Skippy posted:

Only you could turn the sentence "Cut the leg off a pair of pants, fill it with sand and then stitch it closed..." into a verbose 6-step process with two follow-up paragraphs for clarification.

I still don't fully understand Step 3.

Not Nipsy Russell
Oct 6, 2004

Failure is always an option.


Safety Dance posted:

I still don't fully understand Step 3.

Create a zone of glue that extends 2 inches in from one open end of the proto-sandbag

Imagine the section of jeans-leg is a football field. Fill the end zone with glue.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Not Nipsy Russell posted:

Create a zone of glue that extends 2 inches in from one open end of the proto-sandbag

Imagine the section of jeans-leg is a football field. Fill the end zone with glue.

But why am I rolling the jeans that way? I can't see how that would help seal the sand bag. I assume the roll goes out and not in, correct?

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



Safety Dance posted:

But why am I rolling the jeans that way? I can't see how that would help seal the sand bag. I assume the roll goes out and not in, correct?

You're rolling it up over itself. Think about rolling up a piece of paper or a poster or a carpet - like that. That, plus sewing over it, makes an extremely tight seal that doesn't let any sand escape out between stitches in the seam. It basically lets you get away with sewing a much looser (in terms of stich spacing) seam, which means much less work in putting together the bag.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Cyrano4747 posted:

You're rolling it up over itself. Think about rolling up a piece of paper or a poster or a carpet - like that. That, plus sewing over it, makes an extremely tight seal that doesn't let any sand escape out between stitches in the seam. It basically lets you get away with sewing a much looser (in terms of stich spacing) seam, which means much less work in putting together the bag.

Okay, so the thing is getting rolled up like a toothpaste tube, not like you would roll up the cuff on your pants if your pants are too long. I see now.

(I also have a pair of jeans just waiting to be turned into sandbags)

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Us theatre people know that to prevent spills you should double bag your sand in heavy duty plastic before you sew it into a bag.

Or just steal one off of a loading dock somewhere and save the sewing time.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


One Legged Ninja posted:

If you're using centerfire pistol, any mild steel less than 3/8" will probably bend like crazy after a while. 22lr can be 1/8"-3/16", or more, if you test it and get it to swing reliably. Centerfire rifle will wreck mild steel for the most part, but most people don't duel with rifles.

For the hinge, just tilt the whole assembly towards you. The bullets will splatter mostly down into the ground, and gravity will reset the target to one side or another. Protect the hinge itself with something like a piece of angle iron down the length of the vertical, so the bullets don't ding it and pinch it in one position. As to the actual hinge itself, the simpler, the better. If I ever get around to building mine, I'm just going to use a piece of 1/2" or so black iron pipe a few inches long over a rod with a washer welded on to hold it at the right height.

Just remember that the bullets are trying to smash this thing to bits in rapid succession, and eventually they'll probably win. Build it tough, but keep in mind that you'll have to fix or rebuild it some day anyway, as well as carry it to the range, so make it easy to take apart.

The type of steel is really key for targets, I can tell you most centerfire rifle and high quality handgun targets are made out of AR500 steel, which is armor grade. The down side for most people is that AR500 requires a plasma cutter to cut without ruining the heat treat or approximately 50 saws all blades. You will have to special order the steel from almost any supplier.

When it comes to rimfire and pistols up to .357 it is my experience that 1/4 mild steel plate is adequate for heavy rimfire use and light pistol. My current spinner is made out of 2 4"x4"x1/4" steel plates welded together. It does great with handguns, but is too heavy for lots of rimfire fun. Centerfire rifle rounds will go about 3/8" into mild steel with softpoint ammo, FMJ will go all the way through.

I have found that softer steel does well up to 1500 fps because it tends to give a little, the repair welds which have sometimes used bolts as filler always see worse damage later because of their higher hardness/strength and less ability to be cold worked.

Moral of the story is go buy some duraseal gophers because they take anything including my .50 caliber muzzleoader like a champ. They cost less than the materials for metal targets and can be fixed with a leatherman, not a welder.

1 gallon milk jugs full of water and painted bright colors are great with centerfire rifles, pistols don't have enough energy to make them fun. Rotten fruit, especially tomatoes and watermelon are a blast to shoot.

Mishra
Dec 12, 2007



Flatland Crusoe posted:

The type of steel is really key for targets, I can tell you most centerfire rifle and high quality handgun targets are made out of AR500 steel, which is armor grade. The down side for most people is that AR500 requires a plasma cutter to cut without ruining the heat treat or approximately 50 saws all blades. You will have to special order the steel from almost any supplier.

When it comes to rimfire and pistols up to .357 it is my experience that 1/4 mild steel plate is adequate for heavy rimfire use and light pistol. My current spinner is made out of 2 4"x4"x1/4" steel plates welded together. It does great with handguns, but is too heavy for lots of rimfire fun. Centerfire rifle rounds will go about 3/8" into mild steel with softpoint ammo, FMJ will go all the way through.

I have found that softer steel does well up to 1500 fps because it tends to give a little, the repair welds which have sometimes used bolts as filler always see worse damage later because of their higher hardness/strength and less ability to be cold worked.

Moral of the story is go buy some duraseal gophers because they take anything including my .50 caliber muzzleoader like a champ. They cost less than the materials for metal targets and can be fixed with a leatherman, not a welder.

1 gallon milk jugs full of water and painted bright colors are great with centerfire rifles, pistols don't have enough energy to make them fun. Rotten fruit, especially tomatoes and watermelon are a blast to shoot.

We have a water jet cutter in the lab , think that would work? I'm looking more for pistol targets than rifle so softer steel may be ok.

One Legged Ninja
Sep 19, 2007
Feared by shoe salesmen. Defeated by chest-high walls.

Fun Shoe

Flatland Crusoe posted:

The type of steel is really key for targets, I can tell you most centerfire rifle and high quality handgun targets are made out of AR500 steel, which is armor grade. The down side for most people is that AR500 requires a plasma cutter to cut without ruining the heat treat or approximately 50 saws all blades. You will have to special order the steel from almost any supplier.

Yep, that's the stuff to get if you want to set it and forget it, but for the price, and the little use it would see from me, I'd rather use whatever scrap I have laying around. I have almost as much fun building stuff to shoot at as shooting it, though.

Flatland Crusoe posted:


When it comes to rimfire and pistols up to .357 it is my experience that 1/4 mild steel plate is adequate for heavy rimfire use and light pistol. My current spinner is made out of 2 4"x4"x1/4" steel plates welded together. It does great with handguns, but is too heavy for lots of rimfire fun. Centerfire rifle rounds will go about 3/8" into mild steel with softpoint ammo, FMJ will go all the way through.

That's what I figured about the rimfire being too light. We do have an 8" ram made of 1/4" that's bent right down the middle from rimfire, but that's more from the size/thickness ratio. I have a piece of steel from off a railroad tie, probably close to 3/4" in the middle that has a nice crater from my AR-15. Our range has a full size ram at 220 yards made of two layers of 3/4" mild steel that has a ragged 4" hole in the middle, and is cratered everywhere else.

right arm
Oct 29, 2011



We have three dedicated pistol targets, two with about 7" diameter 1/4" thick steel (not sure what type, but my dad punched a hole through it with my brother's AR15 after telling us not to shoot it with rifles) and one that has two 4" steel plates hanging from it. These were all home made, as my dad has access to "free" supplies and tools from work. They've held up to tens of thousands of pistol rounds being shot at them with very little deformation.

We also have two pistol/rifle targets, one is a dueling tree:

http://www.saluteproducts.com/targets/the-salute-dueling-tree.html

And the other is a torso that has little flip out plates for the head, chest, and groin area: (always shoot for the nuts)

http://www.saluteproducts.com/the-salute-spartan.html

Both of these worked just fine with my brother's AR15 and a friend's .44mag handloads.

But if I had to recommend one, I'd say get the dueling tree. It's so incredibly fun and you can decide who loads the several 30 round 522 mags next with it.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


Mishra posted:

We have a water jet cutter in the lab , think that would work? I'm looking more for pistol targets than rifle so softer steel may be ok.

Water jet is fine and will cut anything, you just have to make many passes.

The reason for needing a plasma cutter is minimizing the heat affected zone. Really they just assume that an oxy acetylene torch is the only other common practice for cutting plate steel and you will end up with poor/inconsistent properties around the edges of the steel. The heat effected zone with a plasma cutter is around half the width of the cutting depth, oxy acetylene is going to be 3 times wider than the depth of the cut.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


Cyrano4747 posted:

How to make your own sandbag for shooting or whatever:

1) find a pair of old pants that you're about ready to throw away. Ideally blue jeans, but anything of a suitably thick/tough material would work.

2) Cut a section of one of the legs that is about 5 inches longer than you want the eventual bag to be. There shouldn't be any holes in this section either, for obvious reasons. If there are I've had good luck with applying a cheap iron-on patch to the inside of the leg.

3) Apply the heaviest-duty fabric glue you can find to 2 inches of one of the ends. Use waterproof glue. Roll the fabric up over the glue, so you end up with a round roll of glue/fabric/glue/fabric layers.

4) after that sets up enough that it doesn't want to unroll on you, get a needle and thread. Heavy duty twine or fishing line is pretty ideal. Basically, just don't use some bullshit cotton thread. Use a really basic, circular stitch to reinforce the glue job. I tend to like it pulled fairly tight.

5) let this set up for at least an hour or so. Then, fill the pant leg with as much sand (or dried beans or rice or whatever you like as a filler) as you figure is appropriate.

6) seal up the other end the same way you did the first one.

Boom, shooting rest for a grand total of about $10 plus a worn out pair of pants, assuming that you have none of the required materials already. In my experience you can get about 4 bags out of a pair of pants in decent condition.

If you really want to get ambitious, you can make a v-shaped shooting rest using the crotch of the pants. That's a bit more advanced, but the basic principles are the same. WIth one of those you'll want to stuff it with significantly more sand to make the rest firmer.

Hey, I needed one of those! So I made one + a video of it so people even more retarded than me understand:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtbYlPtzUT4

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006



Heintron posted:

Hey, I needed one of those! So I made one + a video of it so people even more retarded than me understand:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtbYlPtzUT4

Jesus gently caress, I never even thought of zip ties. That's goddamned genius. I way, way overengineer all the random crap I make. At least it's durable I guess? vv


Now to go make about 3 more shooting bags so I can recover my original home-brewed shooting bag from a friend who "borrowed" it and has been using it for about a year solid.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Heintron posted:

Hey, I needed one of those! So I made one + a video of it so people even more retarded than me understand:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtbYlPtzUT4
Any reason you didn't just drop the bag of rice straight into the pants leg? On the off chance one of those zip ties came loose it might help prevent a huge mess.

When I get a chance I think I'll make a front rest from the rear end of some of my old jeans. That should get a few fun looks at the range.

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009



Parts Kit posted:

Any reason you didn't just drop the bag of rice straight into the pants leg? On the off chance one of those zip ties came loose it might help prevent a huge mess.

When I get a chance I think I'll make a front rest from the rear end of some of my old jeans. That should get a few fun looks at the range.

Go whole hog, do it with a pair of these instead.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Heintron posted:

Hey, I needed one of those! So I made one + a video of it so people even more retarded than me understand:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtbYlPtzUT4

Thanks for the video but why do you have guns tattoo'd on your arm

Content: Also, why not just leave the plastic bag in there? Might reduce the chance of spilling sand everywhere.

moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


Sorry, I will ask your permission for my next stupid tattoo.

Having a plastic bag inside the pants leg would make unnecessary noise which would be irritating and would make the bag harder to mold the way you want it when shooting. I fyou want the plastic bag just use it and do nothing at all except just pick up a bag of rice at a grocery store.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Heintron posted:

Sorry, I will ask your permission for my next stupid tattoo.

Having a plastic bag inside the pants leg would make unnecessary noise which would be irritating and would make the bag harder to mold the way you want it when shooting. I fyou want the plastic bag just use it and do nothing at all except just pick up a bag of rice at a grocery store.

I was kidding about the tattoo.

I understand, though, thanks for the video.

denereal visease
Nov 27, 2002

"Research your own experience. Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own."

Heine I like that the first related video is "Shaving with a mora (does not work)."

So if you guys have been in the General Questions thread, you might know that I'm trying to repurpose a guitar case into a discrete gun case. I scored a Peavey hardshell case for $27 today; no key so I'll be contacting a locksmith on monday to get a few made for it.

Do you guys think I should:

A) Pound the guitar-shape molded styrofoam into submission to hug the 930 better for free

or

B) Spend some more money I don't have & order some custom inserts for around $150 at which point I could've just bought a goddamn case

I went to one of the 2 craft stores in town today and they only stock florist foam

e: ooh ooh what if I get a few sheets of the florist foam, layer it firm-soft then get a sheet of bedcover eggcrate open cell foam to layer on top? I know that one shouldn't store a gun in such a container over the long run, and the 930 will sit in there for about 48-72 hours total during my trip.

e2: doing some quick googling led me here, wherein spray foam is used in conjunction with felt/whatever to mold it to the gun. Drawback being it's specific to the gun.

denereal visease fucked around with this message at 19:24 on Jun 16, 2012

Ninja Rope
Oct 22, 2005

Wee.


Does it rain a lot where you shoot? It rains often enough here that I'd be worried about using a shooting rest full of rice. I've heard aquarium gravel is a good substitute.

The Eyes Have It
Feb 9, 2008

Third Eye Sees All
...snookums

Don't use rice for an "adjustable" bag, like a small handheld one you want to squeeze and loosen to adjust.

There is probably a technical term for thus but rice does not have a lot of 'give' in it. So it holds a position and shape well and takes more than a bit of force to make it give/shift, which it does kinda all at once in a way when it goes so fine adjustment is not easy. Sand is better for a squeeze/loosen to finely adjust bag.

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moosepoop
Mar 9, 2007

GET SWOLE


But in a survival situation I can use the rice for food!!!

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