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Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...






What is the Black Library?
Black Library is the publishing arm of Games Workshop Ltd., producing genre fiction in the Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Fantasy universes. BLís output consists of novels, short stories, audio dramas, art books, background supplements, anthologies, and more.

What is Warhammer 40k?
A Starcraft ripoff, basically. You can read more about it in the excellent Warhammer 40k tabletop thread OP here. Another fantastic resource for learning more about Warhammer (both fantasy and 40k) is the Lexicanum wiki.

Genre fiction is terrible. Why should I care?
Genre fiction is indeed terrible, for the most part. However, BL happens to have a few very talented writers pumping out their adolescent power fantasies (and quite a few not-so-talented ones). If youíre already familiar with 40k or WH Fantasy through any of the tabletop games or from playing the 40k video games such as Dawn of War or Space Marine, delving into the related backstory can be very rewarding.

I donít know much about Warhammer/I know far too much about Warhammer. Where should I begin?
The short answer is ďstart with Eisenhorn by Dan Abnett.Ē The slightly longer answer is that there is a guide to most of the worthwhile BL books on this very page, ranked by both quality and suitability to Warhammer newbies!

The Authors
Dan Abnett is the most beloved of all BL authors, and has been around forever. Heís responsible for the Eisenhorn and Ravenor trilogies of Inquisition novels, the Gauntís Ghosts series, and a slew of other stories that range from good to great. Excels at writing large-scale action and developing interesting characters, who he then kills off at an alarming rate.

Aaron Dembski-Bowden, or ADB, is a relative newcomer, but has quickly established himself as being one of the Black Libraryís best writers (alongside Dan Abnett) with his consistently excellent work. Best known for the recently-finished and fantastic Night Lords trilogy. Probably writes the best dialogue in the BL, and is great at taking whatever subject he is given -- be it Chaos Space Marines, Grey Knights, what have you -- and presenting it in a new and interesting light.

Graham McNeill is the head honcho of BL, and has been around forever. He is occasionally excellent but incredibly inconsistent, and most of his recent offerings have been mediocre. However, heís also responsible for some of the best novels to come out of the Black Library, such as Storm of Iron.

Chris Wraight is another newcomer, and while he isnít on quite the same level as Abnett and ADB, he writes really solid, entertaining, well-paced stories with strong characters.

William King is an able writer of pulpy adventure stories, but donít expect much more than that out of him. Wrote the well-regarded Gotrek and Felix and Space Wolves series, and has just recently begun writing for BL again after a long hiatus.

Thereís a long list of other authors who have at least one thing worth reading, but itís easier to talk about them on a book-by-book basis.

Stay away from anything by C.S. Goto or Henry Zou. Far, far away.

Where to buy
You can find pretty much everything on Amazon, and Black Library has a store as well. A lot of titles are being released in ebook and audiobook formats, too.

Mechafunkzilla fucked around with this message at 07:22 on Aug 6, 2012

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Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


The Books
Iíve written up a brief synopsis and review for some of the most popular Black Library titles below, and given them two scores, each out of five: the first is for the quality of the book itself, and the second is for how accessible it is to someone who isnít already familiar with Warhammer backstory. Keep in mind these are just my opinion, and should by no means be taken as authoritative.

Eisenhorn trilogy, by Dan Abnett
A great starting point for getting into the 40k universe, and widely regarded as the best BL novels ever produced. Follows an Imperial Inquisitor as he pursues several investigations across the galaxy. If youíre interested in Warhammer fiction at all, just stop here and go buy this book.
Quality: 5/5
Accessibility: 5/5

Ravenor trilogy, by Dan Abnett
Follows a minor character from the Eisenhorn books, now himself an Inquisitor. Comparable to Eisenhorn in a lot of ways, just not quite as strong as that series. You'll get a lot more out of it if you read Eisenhorn first.
Quality: 4/5
Accessibility: 4/5

Gauntís Ghosts series, by Dan Abnett
Over a dozen books in and still going strong, this series follows an elite Imperial Guard regiment who constantly find themselves up against horrifying odds. You will develop a strong affection for many of the characters, and then they will get killed. Every time. Overall an excellent series, though it doesnít really get going until Necropolis.
Quality: 5/5
Accessibility: 5/5

Night Lords trilogy, by Aaron Dembski-Bowden
Chaos Space Marines are bastards, but goddamn if ADB doesnít make you like them and maybe even empathise a little with them. The protagonist, Talos, is one of the best and most interesting characters to come out of 40k fiction since Gregor Eisenhorn. Not a great choice for those new to 40k.
Quality: 5/5
Accessibility: 2/5

Space Wolf books 1-4, by William King
Vikings in space! Follows a member of the Space Wolves space marine chapter from his recruitment to his exploits as a full battle brother. Great introduction to 40k, though somewhat lighter in tone than most BL books. Itís unabashed fluff, but itís also good unabashed fluff. Book 5 and on were written by a different, inferior author, and shall not be spoken of here.
Quality: 3/5
Accessibility: 5/5

Ciaphas Cain series, by Sandy Mitchell
If you've read the Flashman books by George MacDonald Frasier, the idea is the same -- a hero of the Imperium who is actually a coward whose every move is with an eye towards self-preservation (nevermind that Cain isn't actually a coward). These are a lighter and more comedic take on the 40k universe, and are entertaining if not particularly substantive. They do get repetitive after a while.
Quality: 3/5
Accessibility: 3/5

Other titles:
Great
Brotherhood of the Snake - Dan Abnett. Follows a squad of Space Marines, good introductory book.
The Emperorís Gift - ADB. Grey Knights book leading up to and following the events of the first war for Armageddon.
Helsreach - ADB. First-person take on a Black Templar Chaplain during the third war for Armageddon.
Titanicus - Dan Abnett. Titans! The best Titan book.
Storm of Iron - Graham McNeill. Iron Warriors assault an IG encampment. McNeill's best book by a mile, go buy it.
Pariah - Dan Abnett. First book of a new Inquisition trilogy. Don't even think about reading this until you've finished both the Eisenhorn and Ravenor trilogies. If you read those and enjoyed them, read Pariah.

Good
Double Eagle - Dan Abnett. Planes. Battle of Britain, 40k style.
Imperial Glory - Richard Williams. Zulu in space! Forget about the problematic corollaries between Orks and Africans!
Gunheads - Steve Parker. Men in tanks. Get it if you like tanks.
15 Hours - Mitchel Scanlon. The title refers to the average lifespan of an Imperial Guardsman. It's pretty grim.
Cadian Blood - ADB. ADB's first go at 40k fiction, and not quite as good as his later work but still really solid. Cadians are hardasses.
Shira Calpurnia quadrilogy - Matthew Farrer. Follows the Arbites, who are the police of the Imperium. Think more Judge Dredd than NYPD Blue.
Lord of the Night - Simon Spurrier. A Night Lords captain from the Heresy seeks an artifact that could reunite his legion. Grimdark as heck, and his some minor tie-ins to ADB's Night Lords trilogy.
Atlas Infernal - Rob Sanders. An renegade Inquisitor contends with the Eldar, hostile Imperial agents and Ahzek Ahriman while trying to prevent Real Bad poo poo from going down. Real Bad poo poo goes down anyway. Weird, but fun.
Battle of the Fang - Chris Wraight. Covers the Thousand Sons invasion of Fenris, has some big fluff reveals. Great action, but don't read it until you're familiar with the relevant backstory.
Wrath of Iron - Chris Wraight. Iron Hands fight alongside Imperial Guard against a Chaos incursion. Dark, dark, dark. It's good, but don't go in expecting a feel-good story.
Legion of the Damned - Rob Sanders. Mostly a book about an Imperial Fists successor chapter. Don't expect any big reveals about the LotD, but goddamn this book just oozes atmosphere.
Blood of Asaheim - Chris Wraight. Another Space Wolves story, this time a small group of veterans going up against a planetary invasion of Nurgle-worshipers.
Everything else: ask here first.

Horus Heresy
The Horus Heresy is a series that follows mythical characters and foundational events in the 40k universe, taking place 10,000 years before the regular setting (around the year 30,000). Donít read them until youíre familiar with 40k, and can understand just who all these characters are and why theyíre so important. Unlike regular 40k books, it helps to read them more or less in chronological order. You can see the order here.

The first trilogy - Horus Rising, False Gods, and Galaxy in Flames arenít all great, but theyíre basically required reading for the rest of the series.

Good
Legion - Dan Abnett
The First Heretic - ADB
Fulgrim - Graham McNeill
A Thousand Sons - Graham McNeill
Prospero Burns - Dan Abnett
Know No Fear - Dan Abnett
Betrayer - ADB

Decent
Flight of the Eisenstein - James Swallow
Mechanicum - Graham McNeill
Angel Exterminatus - Graham McNeill
Unremembered Empire - Dan Abnett

Warhammer Fantasy

WHF is much less popular than 40k, and there are fewer books out to reflect this. Still, there are some great stories out there. The cream of the crop includes:

Sword of Justice and Sword of Vengeance duology, by Chris Wraight. If I could only recommend one thing from WHF fiction, it would be this. Great story about two rival heroes in the Empire.
Gotrek and Felix books 1-7, by William King. Super-fun, funny, and action-packed adventure series.
Fell Cargo, by Dan Abnett. Pirates take on monsters, magic, the undead, and other pirates. Swashbuckly as heck.
Honourkeeper, by Nick Kyme. Dwarves beat the poo poo out of everything.
Malus Darkblade series, by Mike Lee. Interesting character, interesting books. Gives a cool look at Dark Elf society.

Mechafunkzilla fucked around with this message at 12:09 on Aug 19, 2014

67 and still making love
Oct 7, 2005

Peek
a
BLARGH


Lovely OP, but I really think that, outdated as they may be, mention should be made of Ian Watson's work.
As much as I like Dan Abnett, Ian Watson's "Space Marine" is the only one I'd recommend on it's own deranged merits as a novel beyond genre fiction, the only BL Book that I would recommend to someone who had no idea about 40k.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Twanki posted:

Lovely OP, but I really think that, outdated as they may be, mention should be made of Ian Watson's work.
As much as I like Dan Abnett, Ian Watson's "Space Marine" is the only one I'd recommend on it's own deranged merits as a novel beyond genre fiction, the only BL Book that I would recommend to someone who had no idea about 40k.

I've actually never read Space Marine or the Inquisition War books, but if anyone wants to do a write-up I'll gladly add it to the OP. I hear they're...strange.

Cat Planet
Jun 26, 2010



Shira Calpurnia probably deserves a mention among the Good Books, since it's a nice Eisenhorn-style investigation and politics series about an Arbites officer. It has a lot of fluff-specific things that will probably need some explanation, but is otherwise pretty interesting. The only disadvantage is that the story seems to drag a bit sometimes (unlike Abnett's, who is good at interspersing slow bits with action scenes).

e: Ugh I suck at reading comprehension.

Mechafunkzilla posted:

Honourkeeper, by Nick Kyme. Dwarves beat the poo poo out of everything.

There is a good book by Nick loving Kyme? Wow, I really need to read this.

Cat Planet fucked around with this message at 00:47 on Jul 7, 2012

Nuclear Tourist
Apr 7, 2005

L'absinthe, c'est la mort!

Heh, nice Starcraft ripoff guys

Haven't been keeping up with BL for a long time, but I recently saw that the first Eisenhorn vs Ravenor novel (Pariah) is due for an October release. Stoked. Abnett was the only BL author I bothered keeping up with.

bunnyofdoom
Mar 29, 2008

He wants to come in...



I think the Ciaphas Cain stuff should be in the op too

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Therion posted:

There is a good book by Nick loving Kyme? Wow, I really need to read this.

You know how his books kind of drag because his protagonists are all surly assholes? Well, with dwarves, it actually works!

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


bunnyofdoom posted:

I think the Ciaphas Cain stuff should be in the op too

Ah, right. Putting it in now.

Nuclear Tourist
Apr 7, 2005

L'absinthe, c'est la mort!

It would also be fun to hear some opinions on the Imperial Armour books. I know they're technically Forge World and not Black Library, but there's a good deal of story and lore in them as well. I quite enjoyed the Siege of Vraks trilogy, the first Badab War book was also pretty cool. The latest one, though, The Doom of Mymeara, was just a godawful loving mess. The story itself was a complete snoozefest and I was pretty surprised to see such an absurd amount of spelling and grammatical mistakes in such a high-quality production (print-wise).

Twinty Zuleps
May 10, 2008

by R. Guyovich


Lipstick Apathy

I genuinely enjoyed Soul Drinker and Daemonworld by Ben Counter. Has he not kept up a good standard, or did he just fall out of 40k novel writing entirely?

Also, I'm not going to be able to pick up another Gaunt's Ghosts book without a guarantee that Lijah Cuu dies in one of them. Does he, and when? After Straight Silver I was fed up with his presence in my spacewar story.

FiendishThingy
Sep 7, 2003



I've only ever read the first book of the Inquisition War series back when it was originally released. At the time I liked it but I never was able to find the other books. I've heard it was re-edited to work in the C'Tan and other fluff changes, is it worth revisiting?

Cat Planet
Jun 26, 2010



Wulfolme posted:

Also, I'm not going to be able to pick up another Gaunt's Ghosts book without a guarantee that Lijah Cuu dies in one of them. Does he, and when? After Straight Silver I was fed up with his presence in my spacewar story.

He does in Sabbat Martyr

Arquinsiel
Jun 1, 2006

"There is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first."

God Bless Margaret Thatcher
God Bless England
RIP My Iron Lady


Wulfolme posted:

I genuinely enjoyed Soul Drinker and Daemonworld by Ben Counter. Has he not kept up a good standard, or did he just fall out of 40k novel writing entirely?

Also, I'm not going to be able to pick up another Gaunt's Ghosts book without a guarantee that Lijah Cuu dies in one of them. Does he, and when? After Straight Silver I was fed up with his presence in my spacewar story.
What Therion said, but you may be better off quitting now if he bothers you that much.

We need a "Fething Cuu " smiley mashup.

Nephilm
Jun 11, 2009

by Lowtax


Wulfolme posted:

I genuinely enjoyed Soul Drinker and Daemonworld by Ben Counter. Has he not kept up a good standard, or did he just fall out of 40k novel writing entirely?

Those were poo poo books. If you enjoy them feel free to check out every book not mentioned in the OP.

S.J.
May 19, 2008

A storm is coming.


Seriously the Soul Drinker series is the worst 40k series I've managed to actually read through the omnibus of. It is loving awful.

the fart question
Mar 21, 2007



College Slice

I read some of the Horus books. They started bad and got worse; they're like warhammer fan fiction written by kids.

Nephilm
Jun 11, 2009

by Lowtax


gender illusionist posted:

I read some of the Horus books. They started bad and got worse; they're like warhammer fan fiction written by kids.

Which did you read?

adamarama
Mar 20, 2009


Angels of Darkness is a great read. It's pretty old now but it explains The Fall so much better than the recent offerings. It follows an interrogation of one of the Fallen by one of the chief Chaplains. It explains the motivations and mindset really well.

I really like Dan Abnett, The Founding and The Saint series are both excellent. The Lost is ok, but is a little off the wall for a Ghosts series. The latest two books have been terrible. The pace is so slow and I think he's getting lazier with the characters.

jadebullet
Mar 25, 2011


MY LIFE FOR YOU!

I actually enjoyed the Soul Drinker books, at least the ones that I read. (2nd and 3rd) They weren't amazing, but I was entertained.

Now, the Dawn of War omnibus was horrible and I never finished it, and really, I wasn't the biggest fan of the Space Wolves books. They were too human, in my opinion.

MisterFuzzles
Dec 5, 2009

We can't go back no more, but I suppose we can go wherever we please.


Probably becoming a broken annoying record by continually mentioning it, but I believe Lord of the Night by Simon Spurrier deserves to be in the list of good books.

Zso Sahaal is basically a proto-Talos.

Dodoman
Feb 26, 2009



A moment of laxity
A lifetime of regret


Lipstick Apathy

The Battlefleet Gothic series was not too bad if you like space battle porn. Also shows the (crappy) life of low level crewmen and how expendable their lives are (when are lives not expendable in 40k though ).

Lovely Joe Stalin
Jun 12, 2007
GW BRAINWORMS CREW OFFICIAL HYPE MAN

College Slice

Starcraft ripoff ? I'll ruddy well cut you.

MisterFuzzles posted:

Probably becoming a broken annoying record by continually mentioning it, but I believe Lord of the Night by Simon Spurrier deserves to be in the list of good books.

Zso Sahaal is basically a proto-Talos.

It should pretty much just be taken as a (very good) optional opener to the Dembski-Bowden trilogy. Did Spurrier do any more books for BL ?

MisterFuzzles
Dec 5, 2009

We can't go back no more, but I suppose we can go wherever we please.


Rapey Joe Stalin posted:

Starcraft ripoff ? I'll ruddy well cut you.


It should pretty much just be taken as a (very good) optional opener to the Dembski-Bowden trilogy. Did Spurrier do any more books for BL ?
Fire Warrior and Xenology According to his wiki page. The Black Library site itself is weird trying to find poo poo by author.

MrFlibble
Nov 28, 2007

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Fallen Rib

Back in my warham days I seem to recall painting a model of a han solo type guy called Kal Jerico. I read a comic with him in it (ages ago) and it seemed pretty good, had a sort of blackadder in space vibe to it. Are the novels any good? On saying that Wikipedia isn't helping me get the names of the books so they must be pretty old/unpopular.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Lord of the Night, Battle of the Fang and Atlas Infernal added to the "good" list in the OP.

Argali
Jun 24, 2004

I will be there to receive the new mind

Not to sperg out here - and the OP probably meant this tongue-in-cheek - but it's silly to call 40k a Starcraft rip-off, since the books predate the video game by a decade.

Anyway, Eisenhorn is an awesome book, highly recommended. It's good enough to immerse yourself in even if you don't know much about the whole 40K universe.

Cat Planet
Jun 26, 2010



It's actually a Dune ripoff but the Starcraft thing is great to infuriate hardcore 'hams with.

Arquinsiel
Jun 1, 2006

"There is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first."

God Bless Margaret Thatcher
God Bless England
RIP My Iron Lady


MrFlibble posted:

Back in my warham days I seem to recall painting a model of a han solo type guy called Kal Jerico. I read a comic with him in it (ages ago) and it seemed pretty good, had a sort of blackadder in space vibe to it. Are the novels any good? On saying that Wikipedia isn't helping me get the names of the books so they must be pretty old/unpopular.
They're not that old, maybe three or four years? I never got to read them, but the comics had a strangely large effect on me. It wasn't until maybe 10 years after reading them that I had the same beard and hairstyle, and one of my friends noticed it only after I'd had it a while.

Ah college....

a shitty king
Mar 26, 2010


MisterFuzzles posted:

Fire Warrior and Xenology According to his wiki page. The Black Library site itself is weird trying to find poo poo by author.

Fire Warrior I thought was actually surprisingly good. It's fairly close to the plot of the videogame, but the main Tau character goes gradually insane as the whole thing is on his first day on the job. I remember enjoying it. And Xenology is excellent but expensive to get hold of now. It's a background book, sort of, but it has a quite spooky story about isolation running through it.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.


Xenology had a great Lovecraft vibe to it, yeah. Absolutely worth reading if you can get access to it.

Just finished Wrath of Iron and thought it was unremarkable, bland bolter porn. Only impression I had at the end was "Wow, the Iron Hands are insecure dickbags."

ed balls balls man
Apr 17, 2006


The Rat posted:

Xenology had a great Lovecraft vibe to it, yeah. Absolutely worth reading if you can get access to it.

Just finished Wrath of Iron and thought it was unremarkable, bland bolter porn. Only impression I had at the end was "Wow, the Iron Hands are insecure dickbags."

Yeah it was super boring, the commissar dude was the worst. Only interesting part of it was that Ferrus Manus wanted to purge the Legion of its reliance on and belief in machine augmentation.

Xenomrph
Dec 9, 2005

AvP Nerd/Fanboy/Shill


Mowglis Haircut posted:

Fire Warrior I thought was actually surprisingly good. It's fairly close to the plot of the videogame, but the main Tau character goes gradually insane as the whole thing is on his first day on the job. I remember enjoying it. And Xenology is excellent but expensive to get hold of now. It's a background book, sort of, but it has a quite spooky story about isolation running through it.
Fire Warrior is great, as is another book by the same author, Lord of the Night. Easily my two favorite Warhammer40k books.

Xenology is awesome, too. Hell, I'll just say that if it was written by Simon Spurrier, it's worth reading.

Xenomrph fucked around with this message at 17:47 on Jul 8, 2012

Evil_Urna
Aug 15, 2004


Creme_filling menonted there was an ork story where: "Also an ork going back in time and killing himself so he could have two of his favorite gun." Where is this from because this sounds awesome.

S.J.
May 19, 2008

A storm is coming.


Evil_Urna posted:

Creme_filling menonted there was an ork story where: "Also an ork going back in time and killing himself so he could have two of his favorite gun." Where is this from because this sounds awesome.

It is from the Ork codex, it's not an actual short story or book.

But that would basically be the most amazing BL book ever.

drkhrs2020
Jul 22, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I did not know CS Goto was that bad. In "Let the Galaxy Burn" short story collection his contribution was one of the few I actually remembered any detail about. Most of them were just some variation of poo poo falling apart for someone.

Also, what are some good Omnibus titles other then the ones listed? Is Grey Knights by Ben Counter any good? Also are there any books that follow someone besides the Imperium or Chaos space marines? The only ones I could find were Eldar ones by CS Goto, but even on Amazon they have lovely reviews.

drkhrs2020 fucked around with this message at 22:30 on Jul 8, 2012

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


drkhrs2020 posted:

I did not know CS Goto was that bad. In "Let the Galaxy Burn" short story collection his contribution was one of the few I actually remembered any detail about. Most of them were just some variation of poo poo falling apart for someone.

Also, what are some good Omnibus titles other then the ones listed? Is Grey Knights by Ben Counter any good? Also are there any books that follow someone besides the Imperium or Chaos space marines? The only ones I could find were Eldar ones by CS Goto, but even on Amazon they have lovely reviews.

The first Grey Knights book is alright, the second less so and the third is awful. I think the Imperial Guard omnibus is kinda okay?

the fart question
Mar 21, 2007



College Slice

Nephilm posted:

Which did you read?

Can't remember exactly where I got to but I do remember the one where Horus gets turned was exceptionally dreadful.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Yeah, False Gods was pretty bad. I thought Galaxy in Flames was significantly better.

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Xenomrph
Dec 9, 2005

AvP Nerd/Fanboy/Shill


drkhrs2020 posted:

I did not know CS Goto was that bad. In "Let the Galaxy Burn" short story collection his contribution was one of the few I actually remembered any detail about. Most of them were just some variation of poo poo falling apart for someone.
I read CS Goto's novelization of 'Dawn of War' and liked it a great deal. It expands on the plot of the game quite a bit.

His other Dawn of War books nosedive in quality pretty quick, though. He also writes about Eldar a lot and I'm not a huge Eldar fan, but that's not exactly his fault. I do have a few of his books in my completely ridiculous stack of Black Library books that I got for dirt-cheap and haven't read yet, so maybe my opinion of him will change.

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