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BogDew
Jun 14, 2006

E:\FILES>quickfli clown.fli

Krispy Kareem posted:

As for obsolete tech, any charger that's not USB. drat it's a hassle trying to figure out which random AC adapter goes to what device.
Read the power specs off the device or charger or enjoy watching the LEDs on your router get brighter and brighter till the unit explodes in magic smoke.

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3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


titties posted:

Steampunk is lame or whatever, but I've been seeing this "most steampunk stuff looks rusty and will kill you" opinion a lot lately though it never comes with an example.

Here, please point out which bits will make you sick:



The pointy knees, ugh.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Zopotantor posted:

Does nobody read the classics any more?

Yes I've read Huckleberry Finn; about 30 years ago like most people my age so I remember just about jack poo poo from it. (Also, I don't need Mark Twain to tell me about verdigris.)

Humphreys
Jan 26, 2013

We conceived a way to use my mother as a porn mule







Krispy Kareem posted:

Mountains of cash isn't pointless when you wake up one morning and no one wants to loan you any money. GE had a large exposure to the financial crisis due to their consumer lending arm and were horribly unprepared for what happened. They were doing stock buybacks at $60 a share in 2006 when their stock price plummeted to $5 a share in 2008.

As for obsolete tech, any charger that's not USB. drat it's a hassle trying to figure out which random AC adapter goes to what device.

My uncle asked if I had a samsung charger the other day...gently caress old Samsung pre-Micro USB.

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


Jerry Cotton posted:

Yes I've read Huckleberry Finn; about 30 years ago like most people my age so I remember just about jack poo poo from it. (Also, I don't need Mark Twain to tell me about verdigris.)

I think Zopotantor was being a bit tongue in cheek there

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


What is this a comedy site all of a sudden?

Horace
Apr 17, 2007

Gone Skiin'



WebDog posted:

That Sim card debate reminded me of some video I saw in 1998 where Olympic swimmer Suzie O'Niell and morning kids show host Jade Gatt were given the "challenge" of getting to the swimming center with Gatt armed with a $100 note and O'Neill; a Telstra Smart Card.

Gatt was shown to be presented with the impossibility of being allowed on a bus with a $100 note and having to find a corner shop to get it broken in order to buy a bus ticket while O'Neill just strolled through Sydney with her Smart Card opening up doors and paying for busses with little or no fuss.
I can't recall if a taxi was attempted.

But the idea for a one size fits all wondercard was stymied for years in Australia over privacy concerns as it was to be pretty much an identity document that revealed all and was open to rampant amounts of identity theft.

PayWave in recent times has pretty much filled the desire to not run around around with tons of shrapnel in your wallet.

That made me smile, the UK went through the same thing with its failed national identity register/ID card scheme which was also going to solve all sorts of problems which no-one ever had. It would have even solved that $100 note problem since you were going to be forced to pay for them.

Sir_Substance
Dec 13, 2013


WebDog posted:

PayWave in recent times has pretty much filled the desire to not run around around with tons of shrapnel in your wallet.

My bank wouldn't disable paywave, I had to take a stanley knife to my card to solve that issue.

Am I the only one who thinks passive wireless access to credit accounts is pretty much the worst idea ever on the face of it, no matter what the technical implementation looks like?

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Sir_Substance posted:

My bank wouldn't disable paywave, I had to take a stanley knife to my card to solve that issue.

Am I the only one who thinks passive wireless access to credit accounts is pretty much the worst idea ever on the face of it, no matter what the technical implementation looks like?

No, but there are lots of needlessly paranoid people in the world. The onus is on the bank, not on you, to protect the cards and the money they represent (in the US).

edit: If you want to destroy the RFID chip in your credit cards, I fully support your right to do so. A few seconds in the microwave will obliterate the chip. You can probably also shatter it with a hammer inside the card. You can find the location of the chip with low-angle light.

Sir_Substance
Dec 13, 2013


DNova posted:

No, but there are lots of needlessly paranoid people in the world. The onus is on the bank, not on you, to protect the cards and the money they represent (in the US).

edit: If you want to destroy the RFID chip in your credit cards, I fully support your right to do so. A few seconds in the microwave will obliterate the chip. You can probably also shatter it with a hammer inside the card. You can find the location of the chip with low-angle light.

I don't want to destroy the chip, that's a far better way of paying then the magnetic strip, it's only the RFID I don't want.

As for the onus being on the bank, you need to read your T's&C's carefully. My banks states that they'll only cover paywave based fraud once the card is reported stolen, so if you don't notice for a few hours...

Better to get rid of it. Both the chip and magnetic strip require pins for everything, it's only paywave that is pinless.

However, that's a legal and technical setup issue. I'll happily continue to argue with you until I'm blue in the face that wireless access to credit lines is, at it's most basic level, a terrible idea you have to work to improve and secure, rather than a good idea that is secure in the first place.

Humphreys
Jan 26, 2013

We conceived a way to use my mother as a porn mule







EDITED OUT REDUNDANT INFO.

If a card is cloned via RFID sniffer it will work usually for only one transaction after the clone, so if they clone while you are in the line at a shop, the data is junk if you buy something with paywave before the thief.

Humphreys has a new favorite as of 02:42 on Apr 22, 2014

Ron Burgundy
Dec 24, 2005
This burrito is delicious, but it is filling.

Depends on the implementation I suppose, seems like it forces PIN verification here for amounts over $100 (Australia)

Jezrael
May 1, 2005
the bagel is an adequate vessel of nutrition

Can anyone say anything about the effectiveness of sleeves that purport to block the rfid signal?

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

BENIS


Jezrael posted:

Can anyone say anything about the effectiveness of sleeves that purport to block the rfid signal?

Do your arms have RFID chips?

Croccers
Jun 15, 2012


Ron Burgundy posted:

Depends on the implementation I suppose, seems like it forces PIN verification here for amounts over $100 (Australia)
Yup, but it doesn't stop from chaining several back-to-back $99 transactions though.
I had someone try to do that once when I was working, he got lovely at me because I refused to keep going until he showed me his ID. He calmed down once I said someone could just nick his card and do the same thing he's doing now.

Sir_Substance
Dec 13, 2013


Ron Burgundy posted:

Depends on the implementation I suppose, seems like it forces PIN verification here for amounts over $100 (Australia)

It depends on the store I think. IIRC it's something like $99 at bunnings, $50 at woolies and $35 at maccas. There must be a default, it's probably something like $50.

However, that's per transaction, not even per store. There's only employee attentiveness stopping someone from just buying several things in different transactions from the same store and nothing stopping someone from just going on a spree through the mall. I could easily rack up 2k in damage given an hour with your card.

TITTIEKISSER69
Mar 19, 2005

I'M JUST HERE TO KISS TITTIESS AND WIN FOOTBALL GAMES!
(AND GET EVERYBODY FIRED)


Jerry Cotton posted:

Do your arms have RFID chips?

That's a bad joke. For everyone else, this is what he means (the inside is foil):

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

Jerry Cotton posted:

Do your arms have RFID chips?

booooooo

Toss another vote onto the "I don't want this poo poo" pile. Jeweler's screwdriver and a tiny mallet. One tap rewards you with a satisfying "pop," and the chip is ruined.

SwivelTits2000
Jan 17, 2007
Retarded

Sir_Substance posted:

Am I the only one who thinks passive wireless access to credit accounts is pretty much the worst idea ever on the face of it, no matter what the technical implementation looks like?

No. You are literally the only person to ever express this opinion on the Internet.

Disable it, problem solved, move on. Myself, I want my mid-80s ATMs with the clacky keys and the monochrome text-only green screens.

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

SwivelTits2000 posted:

No. You are literally the only person to ever express this opinion on the Internet.

Disable it, problem solved, move on. Myself, I want my mid-80s ATMs with the clacky keys and the monochrome text-only green screens.

Bonus awarded if it reads

FEED ME A STRAY CAT

Nutsngum
Oct 9, 2004

I don't think it's nice, you laughing.

Sir_Substance posted:

I don't want to destroy the chip, that's a far better way of paying then the magnetic strip, it's only the RFID I don't want.

As for the onus being on the bank, you need to read your T's&C's carefully. My banks states that they'll only cover paywave based fraud once the card is reported stolen, so if you don't notice for a few hours...


Ah you do realize you are given a reasonable amount of time to declare cards stolen and this applied to your card before paywave came into fashion right?

It sounds like you're in Australia where there's an immense amount of consumer protection for this kind of stuff. The onus is on the banks, stop worrying so much.

Computer viking
May 30, 2011
Now with less breakage.

SwivelTits2000 posted:

No. You are literally the only person to ever express this opinion on the Internet.

Disable it, problem solved, move on. Myself, I want my mid-80s ATMs with the clacky keys and the monochrome text-only green screens.

Those keyboards are completely horrible, though. Hiding my PIN would be so much easier if I didn't have to hammer down each key at a precise angle to get it to register.

Holistic Detective
Feb 2, 2008

effing the ineffable


Here's a cool piece of obsolete technology news:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27141201

Thirty year old Andy Warhol works recovered from Amiga disks.

Phy
Jun 27, 2008





Fun Shoe

That article doesn't include the scrawled MSPaint-style can of soup.



"Computers, huh? But can I paint a can of soup with it?" *fumble fumble mouse* "Presto!"

I guess in my head Andy Warhol sounds like Jon Lovitz...

Monkey Fracas
Sep 11, 2010

...but then you get to the end and a gorilla starts throwing barrels at you!


Grimey Drawer

Phy posted:

That article doesn't include the scrawled MSPaint-style can of soup.



"Computers, huh? But can I paint a can of soup with it?" *fumble fumble mouse* "Presto!"

I guess in my head Andy Warhol sounds like Jon Lovitz...

Wonder how much the computer that made this cost at the time.

"Dazzling soupcan doodle graphics power!"

3,000 USD MSRP

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Monkey Fracas posted:

Wonder how much the computer that made this cost at the time.

"Dazzling soupcan doodle graphics power!"

3,000 USD MSRP
The original Amiga cost $1,295 and was capable of much more than that. It was a brilliant machine, regardless of how badly Warhol could doodle on it.

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

A lot of TV shows in the 1990's used Video Toasters for their special effects, which were just Amigas running proprietary software. Seaquest DSV and the Robocop series come to mind, but there were countless others. The machine was ridiculously powerful.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

A lot of TV shows in the 1990's used Video Toasters for their special effects, which were just Amigas running proprietary software. Seaquest DSV and the Robocop series come to mind, but there were countless others. The machine was ridiculously powerful.
The Video Toaster was actually a hardware expansion. You could do a lot on a stock Amiga, but professional video editing and CGI weren't among that.

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

I'll turn in my nerd badge.

I honestly didn't know about the additional hardware--I visited a VT booth at an expo in Germany back then and the guy running it swore up and down that the machine was just an Amiga 500 with different stickers on it.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

I'll turn in my nerd badge.

I honestly didn't know about the additional hardware--I visited a VT booth at an expo in Germany back then and the guy running it swore up and down that the machine was just an Amiga 500 with different stickers on it.
Wikipedia says (albeit with a big ol' [citation needed], but who'd bother to make this up?) that they eventually started selling standalone, pre-upgraded systems as an alternative to buying the card and computer separately. It would have been a 2000, though; the 500 was the dinky low-end model without expansion slots and wouldn't have been compatible. It wouldn't just have been a rebranded Amiga, but it would have been close enough that I can kinda see where that guy was probably coming from.

The End
Apr 16, 2007

You're welcome.

Sham bam bamina! posted:

The original Amiga cost $1,295 and was capable of much more than that. It was a brilliant machine, regardless of how badly Warhol could doodle on it.

Have you any recollection of what the original bundled Amiga mouse was like? gently caress trying to do anything creative with that godawful hunk of crap.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=...iw=1420&bih=867

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Ergonomics aside, the buttons on the Amiga mouse wore out after like 3 days of use. gently caress that piece of crap.

The first VR setup I tried when I was a kid supposedly ran off a mostly stock Amiga 3000.

fake edit: http://www.retro-vr.co.uk/test/1000CS.html One of these.

GOTTA STAY FAI
Mar 24, 2005

~no glitter in the gutter~
~no twilight galaxy~


College Slice

Thanks for looking up that Video Toaster stuff. It makes sense in retrospect that it in all likelihood wasn't a stock A500 with some fancy software.

At the booth right next to the VT booth, I saw my first video capture setup (also running on an Amiga). If you brought a disk with you, they'd let you pose in front of the camera and save a few stills to take home and show your family and friends! It blew us the gently caress away. The salesman said that he could build a setup just like it if I wanted one at home for the low price of like 6,000 deutsche marks, which, at the time was maybe USD $3,000. I bought a new joystick later instead.

I know the first thing my buddies and I did when we bought our Amigas was buy a decent mouse. When I shelled out for the swank-rear end A600HD to replace my A500 I also bought a sweet absolutely hideous light-up crystal trackball. I don't think I knew anybody who rocked the stock mouse.

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

At the booth right next to the VT booth, I saw my first video capture setup (also running on an Amiga). If you brought a disk with you, they'd let you pose in front of the camera and save a few stills to take home and show your family and friends! It blew us the gently caress away.
Hah, I did this too when I was a kid and visited some computer show. There was a guy with a camera and a frame grabber connected to a computer, and you could pay a small sum to have your picture taken and you'd get it on a floppy along with a program that let you set the picture as the background image in AmigaOS. Iirc AOS at the time didn't have built in support for desktop images.

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


That was back in the computer show golden age. Every one you went to had some weird-rear end custom hardware setup that could do something crazy. SGI desktops that could do water ripple effects in realtime on an image. The Apple GS with great multi-channel audio. Amiga add-ons that could bankrupt a small country. Good times.

KERNOD WEL
Oct 9, 2012


You could add computer shows to the list of obsolete technology. Do they even have those anymore? I remember in the 90s this ad played constantly on cable but with "AT THE DULLES EXPO CENTER IN CHANTILLY!!!" dubbed in:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFf-mMxo8JI

Exit Strategy
Dec 10, 2010



KERNOD WEL posted:

You could add computer shows to the list of obsolete technology. Do they even have those anymore? I remember in the 90s this ad played constantly on cable but with "AT THE DULLES EXPO CENTER IN CHANTILLY!!!" dubbed in:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFf-mMxo8JI

Part of me misses computer shows. Best Sunday I had when I was 16 involved going to a computer show, then a gun show. In the same building. And buying poo poo at both.

Jedit
Dec 10, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 31 minutes!


GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

A lot of TV shows in the 1990's used Video Toasters for their special effects, which were just Amigas running proprietary software. Seaquest DSV and the Robocop series come to mind, but there were countless others. The machine was ridiculously powerful.

Babylon 5 is the famous example. All the graphics were done using Lightwave.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




The End posted:

Have you any recollection of what the original bundled Amiga mouse was like? gently caress trying to do anything creative with that godawful hunk of crap.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=...iw=1420&bih=867
I didn't say that that he was bad at using the Amiga (there are some pretty impressive images in the news articles), just that the can was a crappy doodle. I'm sure that it was just something he tossed off to familiarize himself with the machine, especially given the subject.

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Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


Jedit posted:

Babylon 5 is the famous example. All the graphics were done using Lightwave.

More here: http://www.midwinter.com/lurk/making/effects.html

quote:

Macs have been essential to the creation of the show from the beginning. Even farther back, the Amiga and the Newtek Toaster were employed.
Currently we use Pentiums and Alphas for animation, Macs for Editing, Matte paintings and Compositing, and SGI's for Compositing and titling.

...

Alphas for design stations serving 5 animators and one animation assistant (housekeeping and slate specialist). Most of these stations run Lightwave and a couple add Softimage. VERY plug-in hungry. PVR's on every station, with calibrated component NTSC (darn it, I hates ntsc) right beside.
P6's in quad enclosures for part of the renderstack, and Alphas for the rest, backed up 2x per day to an optical jukebox.
Completed shots output to a DDR post rendering and get integrated into the show.
Shots to composite go to the Macs running After Effects, or the SGI running Flint, depending on the type of comp being done, and then to the DDR (8 minutes capacity on the SGI).

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