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swamp waste
Nov 4, 2009

There is some very sensual touching going on in the cutscene there. i don't actually think it means anything sexual but it's cool how it contrasts with modern ideas of what bad ass stuff should be like. It even seems authentic to some kind of chivalric masculine touching from a tyme longe gone


Groke posted:

Yah, this was the era that brought us Dr. Strangelove and all. That movie was a satire but you can bet your rear end there were at least done some serious feasibility studies of similar doomsday devices.

There were way more than feasibility studies. Dead Hand was not only a real thing, it's possibly still in use. Now, unlike the one in the movie, it can be turned off, but yeah that poo poo is real.

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Monkey Fracas
Sep 11, 2010

...but then you get to the end and a gorilla starts throwing barrels at you!


Grimey Drawer

yaoi prophet posted:

I remember having one of those! IIRC you sent files to your computer by plugging it in and hitting a 'send' button, and it would then essentially act as a keyboard 'typing' out the document very quickly.

That is adorable (well, as as ancient computing can be, anyway) if true.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





yaoi prophet posted:

I remember having one of those! IIRC you sent files to your computer by plugging it in and hitting a 'send' button, and it would then essentially act as a keyboard 'typing' out the document very quickly.

I'd completely forgotten that! I think I actually opened a Notepad window before hitting send -- I don't remember an accompanying PC/Mac app that listened.

thedouche
Mar 20, 2007
Greetings from thedouche



Acting like a keyboard rather than spitting out a text file is so cool. How big was the character limit?

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004

Arrrr ye landlubber

When we used Alphasmarts in school, we physically unplugged the mini-din connector that went into the Apple computer keyboard, and plugged the alphasmart into the curly cable.

Wacky Delly
Apr 2, 2008






On a similar note. I learned to type on one of these:


A typewriter with enough in it to also do word processing through the attached monitor. You could type out whatever, then load the paper and it would print it using the typewriter's daisy wheel. I would always stay up late writing my homework then couldn't print it because the thing was loud as hell. Almost always remembered to print it before school.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





The Alphasmart 3K (in sizzling Bondi blue) had a mighty 200K. The Dana had 16M.

semiavrage
Apr 28, 2007

I'll show them... I'll show ALL of them...


Monkey Fracas posted:

That is adorable (well, as as ancient computing can be, anyway) if true.

Totally true, I remember this too! You would plug them in to the keyboard slot and open notepad. It would quickly type it out through the keyboard port. The AlphaSmart had 4 lines of text and was a horrible, horrible, device, but at the same time, they were impossible to break. I managed to break the screen on mine once by putting it in a binder and having the metal ring punch through the screen. That's it.

Inspector 34
Mar 9, 2009
DOES NOT RESPECT THE RUN

BUT THEY WILL



Should've used a hole-punch first.

UnfortunateSexFart
May 18, 2008

𒃻 𒌓𒁉𒋫 𒆷𒁀𒅅𒆷
𒆠𒂖 𒌉 𒌫 𒁮𒈠𒈾𒅗 𒂉 𒉡𒌒𒂉𒊑




Athenry posted:

On a similar note. I learned to type on one of these:


A typewriter with enough in it to also do word processing through the attached monitor. You could type out whatever, then load the paper and it would print it using the typewriter's daisy wheel. I would always stay up late writing my homework then couldn't print it because the thing was loud as hell. Almost always remembered to print it before school.

My high school's keyboarding class still used these as of 1997, without the monitor. We also had to re-use bubble sheets for tests, erasing the previous users' answers and hoping it didn't read incorrectly. Horribly under-funded.

I'm guessing bubble sheets are obsolete too now? As are keyboarding classes?

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


leidend posted:

My high school's keyboarding class still used these as of 1997, without the monitor. We also had to re-use bubble sheets for tests, erasing the previous users' answers and hoping it didn't read incorrectly. Horribly under-funded.

I'm guessing bubble sheets are obsolete too now? As are keyboarding classes?

As of 2005, high schools were still using Scantron and their ilk, as well as teaching a basic typing/office suite literacy course.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I had to learn touch typing in middle school and hated it. I saw no point and almost immediately forgot all about it.

Then I got on IRC in high school and a month later was typing at 100+ wpm

thedouche
Mar 20, 2007
Greetings from thedouche



kastein posted:

I had to learn touch typing in middle school and hated it. I saw no point and almost immediately forgot all about it.

Then I got on IRC in high school and a month later was typing at 100+ wpm

I learned how to type in keyboarding class, but I learned how to type fast on ICQ ("UH OH!" A cash register at a local gas station uses that sound for something and it cracks me up).

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


thedouche posted:

I learned how to type in keyboarding class, but I learned how to type fast on ICQ ("UH OH!" A cash register at a local gas station uses that sound for something and it cracks me up).

Hah! My local gas station uses that sound too (uh, do you live in NE Ohio?), and I use it for my text alert sound.






e: I think that in 5 years of college I only took one test that involved a computer over a Scantron/bubble sheet.

Hypnolobster has a new favorite as of 00:06 on May 9, 2013

mactheknife
Jul 20, 2004

THE JOLLY CANDY-LIKE BUTTON


cobalt impurity posted:

As of 2005, high schools were still using Scantron and their ilk, as well as teaching a basic typing/office suite literacy course.

I just finished a master's at an under-funded but not bankrupt major state school and Scantron is 100% still a thing, and I'm sure it will stay a thing for a long time. I'm 26 and have been using it since grade school.

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

There he go


leidend posted:

I'm guessing bubble sheets are obsolete too now? As are keyboarding classes?

Keyboarding classes maybe, but bubble sheets and standardized tests that use them are very much alive and well, even at more well-off schools. Just took one today, in fact!

Cream-of-Plenty
Apr 21, 2010


What would "bubble sheets" like Scantrons even have been replaced with? It's shocking that, for as ubiquitous a technology as it is, anybody would think it's gone/replaced.

charliemaul
Jun 7, 2003

Tonight I was sick of myself. Sick of how I treat my children and how I've become my father, an alcoholic ch

WebDog posted:

I was messing around the other day with putting Blood Dragon through an old mac Monitor. Windows 8 is surprisingly scalable.



And no picture of playing Blood Dragon? WHYYYY?

thedouche
Mar 20, 2007
Greetings from thedouche



Hypnolobster posted:

Hah! My local gas station uses that sound too (uh, do you live in NE Ohio?), and I use it for my text alert sound.






e: I think that in 5 years of college I only took one test that involved a computer over a Scantron/bubble sheet.

I'm in central AR. The chain that had the ICQ cash register was called Doublebee's. I haven't been in awhile since they stopped being open at really early hours.

When I was in college in the early 2000's, we used scantrons like they were going out of style. They made us buy them at the campus bookstore or convenience stores rather than providing them.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003

patton oswalt, aka:

- the bloodguzzler
- parton osmart
- the krustbuster
- bloodlard
- pat "the ton" owsdtwslalt
- the big patswald
- wifemurderer
- fentanyl prostate injection

You Are A Elf posted:

That is ubiquitous with 1970s and earlier TV sets and the then recent 1980s technology, and man, that TV had an awesome picture when playing NES on it. So what I was seeing on my old rear end TV with my NES looked like this:



Looked like this on my friend's 46" piece of poo poo TV with the same game:



gently caress my childhood friend, and gently caress those old school big screen projection TVs. I mean, the technology did get better because the early 2000s HDTVs with the same technology look mighty fine, but the early technology just sucked really bad and didn't account for BIGGER = BETTER at all.

Those old projection TVs were horrible. My uncle had one back in the early 90s and it was basically unwatchable unless you sat dead center, and even then it kind of looked like the picture above. The early HD CRT RPTVs actually had the potential to look good, but they often looked like blurry poo poo out of the box. I used to read AVSForum and a couple of other home theater boards around that time and there were people there who actually made their living traveling around and calibrating these TVs. I've seen a couple of properly setup CRT projection TVs that looked absolutely fantastic, but they still needed maintenance to keep looking good. The later LCOS/DLP/LCD sets were much better out of the box, but they still had issues with viewing angles, bulb life and internal dust.

RC and Moon Pie
May 5, 2011



Someone cleaned out an old desk at work. This was the highlight:





Considering our current technology, this was probably used in the past 10 years.

BogDew
Jun 14, 2006

E:\FILES>quickfli clown.fli

charliemaul posted:

And no picture of playing Blood Dragon? WHYYYY?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zzy8vi__m0

Dick Trauma
Nov 30, 2007

God damn it, you've got to be kind.

Clapping Larry


Lightning fast ZMODEM!

I shouldn't laugh. When I finally got Telix and a modem that could use Zmodem I thought it was pretty cool.

Agar Agar
Jun 14, 2007



Hypnolobster posted:

Hah! My local gas station uses that sound too (uh, do you live in NE Ohio?), and I use it for my text alert sound.


Have heard it around Texas too, mostly in Shell stations it seems. I wonder if ICQ just got it from some stock sound file place and now gas stations think it's the best thing ever.

Penguissimo
Apr 7, 2007



Agar Agar posted:

Have heard it around Texas too, mostly in Shell stations it seems. I wonder if ICQ just got it from some stock sound file place and now gas stations think it's the best thing ever.

I heard it at a gas station in mid-Michigan the other day, and I thought I was going crazy. Doesn't seem like there's a geographic pattern here!

Code Jockey
Jan 24, 2006

you can call
but I seldom answer after all





Ha! I've heard the ICQ Uh Oh! in NW Washington and NW Oregon too. I couldn't remember where I'd heard it, but I remember thinking "holy poo poo, that sound!"

Also I've been to a few stations that play the Sonic "pick up a ring" sound when the register processes an order. It's awesome.

And I was in college in early 2000s [graduated 2006] and I remember buying piles of scantron packets at the bookstore.

Ron Burgundy
Dec 24, 2005
This burrito is delicious, but it is filling.

Just to throw the geographical thing off totally, several IGA stores in Perth, Western Australia use the noise on their cash registers.

UnfortunateSexFart
May 18, 2008

𒃻 𒌓𒁉𒋫 𒆷𒁀𒅅𒆷
𒆠𒂖 𒌉 𒌫 𒁮𒈠𒈾𒅗 𒂉 𒉡𒌒𒂉𒊑




Cream-of-Plenty posted:

What would "bubble sheets" like Scantrons even have been replaced with? It's shocking that, for as ubiquitous a technology as it is, anybody would think it's gone/replaced.

Shocking, really? I haven't had a multiple choice test in school since 1997, I assumed something had taken its place.

JediTalentAgent
Jun 5, 2005
Hey, look. Look, if- if you screw me on this, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine, you rat bastard!

Cream-of-Plenty posted:

What would "bubble sheets" like Scantrons even have been replaced with?

Once electronic handwriting or voice recognition becomes good enough, likely that. It might allow full-automation without the multiple choice acting as a hint where the correct answer possibility can be whittled down by guesses, word-recognition and known-falses.

Croccers
Jun 15, 2012


I'm in Adelaide, South Australia and my work uses the Windows 98 Chime when we need to start a fuel pump.

Bonzo
Mar 11, 2004

Just like Mama used to make it!


The "uh-oh" sound was also used in WS-FTP to tell you your download was complete.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Getting in on scantron-chat, all the big standardized tests use them. Our neighboring school district got in big trouble for erasing incorrect marks and replacing them with correct answers. Like get fired and go to jail kind of trouble.

Gin and Juche
Apr 3, 2008

The Highest Judge of Paradise
Shiki Eiki
YAMAXANADU


This thing right here was my first "mp3" player.


Seemed logical, had a minizipdisk drive on my laptop so I could use those suckers to play music and trade games between friends!

Thing was a pain in the rear end, only 80mb of storage between disks, clunky, slow. Made for a good portable minizip disk drive...which since it fit into the card slot of my laptop was already about as portable as you can get.

Code Jockey
Jan 24, 2006

you can call
but I seldom answer after all





Krispy Kareem posted:

Getting in on scantron-chat, all the big standardized tests use them. Our neighboring school district got in big trouble for erasing incorrect marks and replacing them with correct answers. Like get fired and go to jail kind of trouble.

Slight derail but is this part of the massive investigation going on with this in Atlanta? I heard on NPR the other day that a bunch of schools got nailed for changing test scores, erasing bad ones and entering good ones.

If I recall, erasing a scantron answer bubble still left quite a mark on it, dark enough that I used to worry that it'd still get picked up as my answer instead of the one I changed it to.

I also always wondered about those mystery bubbles that weren't part of the main answer grid. Never did fill any in, but I always wondered what they controlled.

thedouche
Mar 20, 2007
Greetings from thedouche



I wonder if anyone has made the correct answers to a test come out as a design. Young me would have been freaked out if a perfectly answered two column scantron looked like a Christmas tree or a person with a big butt or something.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Code Jockey posted:

Slight derail but is this part of the massive investigation going on with this in Atlanta? I heard on NPR the other day that a bunch of schools got nailed for changing test scores, erasing bad ones and entering good ones.

If I recall, erasing a scantron answer bubble still left quite a mark on it, dark enough that I used to worry that it'd still get picked up as my answer instead of the one I changed it to.

I also always wondered about those mystery bubbles that weren't part of the main answer grid. Never did fill any in, but I always wondered what they controlled.

Yep, it's the Atlanta mess. You expect a certain number of erasers, but several Atlanta schools were off the chart, which started the investigation. The superintendent and a bunch of principals, teachers, and proctors were arrested. Not so much for cheating but because they received cash bonuses for those good grades (hello racketeering).

So yeah, you can't totally erase a Scan-Tron answer, but the grading computer is smart enough to tell the difference.

thedouche
Mar 20, 2007
Greetings from thedouche



This is cool. I wonder if they just get all of the erased answer data for the district and do a Grubb's outlier test or something?

Zenostein
Aug 15, 2008

Alhamdulillah-chan

thedouche posted:

I wonder if anyone has made the correct answers to a test come out as a design. Young me would have been freaked out if a perfectly answered two column scantron looked like a Christmas tree or a person with a big butt or something.

When I was in high school, we were required to take some state exam, but it didn't matter because we were in the AP program. My friend filled in the bubble sheet to be a smiley face.

Also while I was in high school, the town over got hit pretty hard for faculty "reviewing" SAT answer sheets; but they went even further and actually helped the students during the exam, I believe.


JediTalentAgent posted:

Once electronic handwriting or voice recognition becomes good enough, likely that. It might allow full-automation without the multiple choice acting as a hint where the correct answer possibility can be whittled down by guesses, word-recognition and known-falses.

That seems pretty unlikely. For one thing, certain exams which use scantrons and have an essay section, like the ACT or the new SAT still have someone actually read the written part. And the point of standardized tests is that they have multiple choice in the first place, so electronic handwriting won't help there. And voice recognition would be an absolute disaster for that kind of test, unless you can somehow sequester every test taker in a soundproof room/booth.

Besides, when basically every major examination uses them, you aren't going to see a change anytime soon. It's a convenient and easy way to handle the SATs, LSATs, GRE, MCAT, &c.

Cream-of-Plenty
Apr 21, 2010


leidend posted:

Shocking, really? I haven't had a multiple choice test in school since 1997, I assumed something had taken its place.

Yeah, I still think it's really surprising. I mean, if anything, schools have consumed more Scantron-style materials since 1997, what with all the emphasis on standardized testing (at least in the United States). Even outside of a school environment, that whole "bubble in" technology is used on a lot of government forms and for various applications, to help eliminate errors. Beyond JediTalentAgent's post, I'm not sure why anybody would think they'd been replaced with anything. They require paper and #2 lead. They are the cheapest, fastest thing available to public schools and government departments. Maybe everybody just remembers them from highschool and college and figures they disappeared with [expensive new technology here] after they graduated?

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Stairs
Oct 12, 2004


Krispy Kareem posted:

Yep, it's the Atlanta mess. You expect a certain number of erasers, but several Atlanta schools were off the chart, which started the investigation. The superintendent and a bunch of principals, teachers, and proctors were arrested. Not so much for cheating but because they received cash bonuses for those good grades (hello racketeering).

So yeah, you can't totally erase a Scan-Tron answer, but the grading computer is smart enough to tell the difference.

Gah my husband is a teacher in Fayette County and the security crap he had to deal with just to give the EOCT this year because of Atlanta...

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