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Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


Collateral Damage posted:

Even modern film audio is optically coded on the reel for cinemas that haven't gone fully digital yet.

Below a "modern" 3D film frame. The blue bitmap tracks on the sides are SDDS sound and the black bitmaps between the holes is Dolby Digital. If you look closely you can see the DD logo in the center of each bitmap. Then there's the old stereo analog track, and finally the dashed line is for DTS. With DTS the actual soundtrack comes on a seperate CD-ROM and the dashed line is a time code for synchronizing sound and picture.



Okay, I know this is a few pages back, but how the heck does this Dolby Audio track work? Does the projector literally scan the space between each sprocket hole like a QR code to glean the digital audio data off of the film?

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Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


Binary Badger posted:

I only liked that one A-10 sim on the Mac where you could arm yourself with multiple sidewinders and nukes. Even then all I did was start my engines, keep my gear down, and drop the nuke just to see how far downrange the cockpit would fall after the blast.



A-10: Cuba on the Mac is still my all-time favorite flight simulator.

I know the big titles like X-Plane are still making new releases, but they're trying to have the best of both worlds by making it simple for casual gamers, but allowing for all the crazy tiny details for the spergiest players

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


Humphreys posted:

Speaking of laptops, this failed but awesome design:

gScreen Spacebook:


and its cute friend:



You're gonna have to elaborate, because I have no idea how the hell these designs are practical

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


JediTalentAgent posted:

I'm trying to find evidence of this, and I can't, but I'm sure I tried it at least once.

I could have sworn in the late 90s Yahoo had some short-lived automated telephone e-mail checking thing that you were assigned a numeric ID code and a pass code and you could dial an 800 number and I think it would 'read' new e-mails to you over the phone or tell you if you had new emails waiting.

Is this it?



I could not find any pictures on the internet so I just took one myself. This device is called the "Rooster", apparently. It has two jacks in the bottom for plugging into your modem and phone line. This particular one belongs to my coworker, and the way he describes it working is that you would "register" the device with your ISP, and then whenever a new email reached your address, the ISP would send a special call....tone?, or pulse (or something) to your home phone line, which would get picked up by the Rooster, which would increment the displayed number by 1 to tell you how many unread emails are in your inbox. I think it also makes a sound whenever you get a new email.

I'm having a hard time thinking of a more obsolete and useless 90's technology than this.

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


minato posted:

It should be a legal requirement for the programmers to eventually reveal How The Feather They Did That.

An incredible amount of dedication. I can't find a link right now, but I read a developer blog a while back that detailed how they used an FPGA to create their own framebuffer/rasterizer chip that added onto the C64 to render some of these types of effects. Essentially these people are hacking apart the hardware almost to the individual transistors and reprogramming them far beyond their original intended use. I'm glad that Fairlight video got linked because it's a great example of the kind of things that are still being done to this day.

e: this video showed up in the Related tab, if you want the long, long answer

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


I just noticed in my B&H catalog today: The Kensington EXPERT MOUSE is still being produced


Experts only

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


I'm going to have nightmares now

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


WebDog posted:

I was reminded of this bizarrely fascinating documentary : Gizmo, which appears to be an assortment of newsreels inventors trying to show off their inventions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaVwqraUKxA.

My favorite is at 18:37 - a clever trap designed to catch delinquent children

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


minato posted:

Makes me long for the days of Jet Set Willy II's copy protection, which was a colourful grid inside the cassette inlay. When the game booted it gave you random coordinates and you had to plug in the right colours for the game to work. Tedious to copy by hand, because colour photocopiers didn't exist. Although you could take a picture of it with a film camera and develop that, I guess.

Operation Stealth's copy protection was some system where you needed to cover an image with a piece of red cellophane, again not something that was easy to copy. And wasn't there some game like Ultima where it came with a map printed onto actual cloth that you needed to complete the game?

Out of This World came packaged with a crazy code wheel (in two parts) that you had to use to decode certain keys the game would ask for before you could start playing.

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


JediTalentAgent posted:

Wasn't there something to do with MS creating a separate format for the Zune in order to appease companies that had bought into the PlaysForSure technology and not pull away people who bought their devices to the MS Zune store?

All I know is that my zune appears to be a PlaysForSure device in almost all aspects except actual functionality. Heck, even connecting it to Linux, it shows up on Rhythmbox as a music device and I can browse its contents. But everything else - transfers, syncing, etc. is broken. So, it uses a protocol called "Plays For Sure" for a device that, in reality, does not play for sure in almost all situations.

For all its faults, I still love my Zune though.

Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


I just threw away a box of these



Wikipedia posted:

A video floppy, also known as a VF disk, could store up to 25 frames either in the NTSC or PAL video standards, with each frame containing 2 fields of interlaced video.

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Dogan
Aug 2, 2006


For some reason I had it in my mind that the glove only covered your index finger, thumb, and palm. Like a billiards glove only less useful

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