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nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Creature posted:

I knew someone who had one of those. It looked dumb as hell when they talked into it. Wasn't the N-Gage the one where you had to remove the battery to change the little game cards?

Yes, and also spawned the meme known as "sidetalking".

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nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Groke posted:

Har. Seems like building an electronic ticket system that isn't total poo poo is a difficult problem everywhere.

San Francisco more or less transitioned to RFID tech, and had relatively few bumps in the road. At least, considering the amount of money involved.

EZ Pass is a plastic block that you stick to your car windshield, in order to drive over the Golden Gate bridge without stopping to pay the toll in cash. Slowing down is considerably faster and more efficient than stopping, so many toll taker jobs were eliminated (unfortunate, maybe). Similarly, there is a card called the Clipper that is basically a thick credit-card-size plastic card with RFID inside that allows you to ride the ferry, the bus, and possibly BART (light rail). Dunno about the train inside the city (caltrain), because I think I have never even met a person that has used it. The card and EZ Pass can be set up to automatically reload from a bank account or charge card or online; the card can also be refilled at stations in the ferry and bus terminals.

If you're not familiar with the city, it's extremely expensive and land-locked (it's a peninsula), meaning tons of people commute. The system seems, to the casual observer, to be slightly faster and easier than any cash-based system. In fact, they announced that the bridge won't accept cash at some point in the future that I can't recall.

So...there's one? Possibly more successful because more people drive than use public transportation.

I'd like to nominate power intensive processors to the ranks of obsolete tech. When even Intel is making cell phone processors -- likely at a loss, due to the utter and complete dominance of ARM -- you know that there's finally a shift. I have an i5 laptop when I don't game; all I want is zero lag when I do basic work and web-browsing, yet my battery barely squeaks out 5 hours. In the near future, due to how well cell phones work, we'll have laptops that consume less power; boot faster; and cost less than ever.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Totally Reasonable posted:

Laptops are going to have a place with reporters and other writing professionals for a good long time. Nobody is going to enjoy typing at 65wpm on something with a <10" screen.

Coincidentally, reporters are obsolete technology.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Speaking of trackballs, we had this when I was a kid:

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Lowen SoDium posted:

For starters, file attachments on email are unsolicited. You could send a large file to me, regardless if you know me or not and fill up my mail box or impede mail delivery.

Secondly, in almost all cases, you can not trust users to manage anything about their accounts. In many cases, even if you make the defaults "most secure", you will have people who don't know what they messing up their accounts to allow things they shouldn't (or people maliciously altering other peoples account settings).

Finally, while storage is cheap, pretty universally, I personally manage a about 2 dozen remote sites for my company that have T1 dedicated circuits to our HQ and maybe 3Mbps/1Mbps internet connections serving anywhere from 20 to 80 people, plus inventory management and shipping systems. That combined with my first point makes unrestricted file sizes a potentially disruptive thing when used by average users



Email isn't likely to go away anytime soon, but I think it will continue to consolidate in to fewer and fewer providers (more and more corporations are moving to cloud based email with Microsoft or Google rather than internally hosted). And I expect these providers to eventually move to some kind of newer email protocol that they use between each other that has more trust and verification of senders involved. If that ever happens, I personally think that SMTP as it is to day may eventually die off because the only people who would continue to use it would be spammers.

Google is in the process of opening the gmail API, I think.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Krispy Kareem posted:

That reminds me of the terrible wireless options we had at the turn of the century.

Wi-Max

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


I had a WinMo phone in the Bad Old Days of WinMo (2006/2007? I think). The iPhone had just come out, but my phone had apps, 3G, etc., so of course it was better.

Things that predictably caused my phones to freeze, necessitating pulling the battery (happened across two separate models, even after the "upgrade" to old WinMo):
-The alarm
-Phone calls

The loving thing failed to wake me up so many times, it's amazing I wasn't fired from my old lovely job. Meanwhile, here comes a phone call ON YOUR PHONE from someone important...and the loving thing just freezes entirely.

The first one had a stylus, which was necessary, because old WinMo had tiny little buttons in the UI that were clearly not meant for a touch interface. The second one was heavily skinned, but you would click a nicely skinned button, which would open a jarringly lovely system app.

On the other hand, I miss a lot of things from old WinMo, such as

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Lowen SoDium posted:


I remember having some friends that got the iPhone when it first launched. It didn't have GPS, copy and paste, 3G, MMS, videos recording capabilities, apps (and when it did get apps, it couldn't multitask), A2DP bluetooth audio, and only had a half VGA screen. It literally wasn't even a smartphone. My WinMo phone had all of those capabilities and better specs. The only 2 things that the iPhone had over my phone was that it had better battery life and a better finger driven UI.


Me back then: "pft iPhone, check out how much more poo poo my phone can do" *removes battery to reboot* "wait a sec"

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


As of about 10 years ago, Enterprise Rent-A-Car bought ~10% of all new cars sold in America. Most people don't know, as they're not publicly traded, that they're the largest rental company in the US by a wide margin. They absolutely buy economy cars without power windows, 1) because they're like $300 more per car; and 2) because they can upsell more easily when a car lacks power windows, cruise control, and an aux input.

nocal
Mar 7, 2007


Tunicate posted:

I had an argument with someone who insisted that all objects have the same terminal velocity because galileo proved it.

Like... dude. Have you ever dropped a balloon?

I suppose you think someone will be triggered by your physics joke

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nocal
Mar 7, 2007


twistedmentat posted:

Grape is my goto flavor, but thanks to 90s comedians, there's a huge stigma attached to grape pop. Lime is my backup, then orange.

I can't think of the last time I saw a coffee vending machine. I guess people would be skeptical these days of just getting coffee in a paper cup from a machine.

90s comedians are the reason I don't stand in front of brick walls, roll up the sleeves on my blazer, or gently caress other men.

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