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dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

From a few pages back:

Axeman Jim posted:

The biggest need for new trains was in the London area, where some of the stock had passed half a century in service and was literally falling to pieces. It all was also completely in violation of modern safety and disabled access requirements.

I remember riding in these up until a couple of years ago

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Ze...c_multiple_unit

Definitely not a failure as they were in service so long, but they were in a pretty grim state even by the early 90s when I first started catching the train. Obviously absolutely no regard for health and safety and nothing in the way of disabled access.

---

These things also stayed in service well after they should have been replaced


Nothing like waiting for the bus driver to reconnect the overhead wires when you're running late for work.

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dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Call Now posted:

Trolleybuses still function in my city and they totally own, dewiring happens incredibly rarely. Also they are more comfortable than normal buses

Yeah we still have them and I still catch one most mornings they're just newer, bigger models with fancy mod cons like a low floor and cabin heating.

They still come off the lines frequently though which I think is a combination of hilly terrain, poor network maintenance and badly trained drivers.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Monkey Fracas posted:

This car is pretty much Fallout: The Car. It's got that "Yaaayyy nuclear power! Everything should be nuclear powered! My toaster has a small reactor in it! " vibe to it.

Speaking of that I came across this wikipedia page the other day: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_quackery

Basically can be summed up as 'we're not quite sure what radiation does but its obviously a health benefit'

I particularly like this thing:

which is a pot specifically designed to irradiate your drinking water

quote:

The Radium Ore Revigator was a pseudoscientific medical device consisting of a ceramic water crock lined with radioactive materials. It was patented in 1912 by R. W. Thomas, an invalid in California,[1] and manufactured by the Radium Ore Revigator Co., which sold thousands of the devices in the 1920s and '30s.

The Revigator was intended to be filled with water overnight, which would be irradiated by the uranium and radium in the liner, and then consumed the next day. This was marketed as a healthy practice which could prevent illnesses including arthritis, flatulence, and senility.

The Revigator contained carnotite K2(UO2)2(VO4)23H2O. Water stored overnight in a vintage Revigator was analyzed by ICP/MS and radiation detectors. Although the water contained higher levels of radon, the health risk from radiation was low. But the water also contained arsenic, lead, vanadium, and uranium.

Brilliant

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Most laptops do have a 100% full sized keyboard - even the little 12.5" HP I'm using is only very slightly off.

Also the track point is anything but obsolete - almost all business class laptops have one and a lot of people prefer it as its Mich easier to use in conjunction with the keyboard than any other type of pointing device.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

blugu64 posted:

This is incorrect. There can only be one



While the keyboard as a whole is obviously much bigger and heavier than something modern you'll find the key spacing of the main part of the keyboard (ie Q to P) is exactly the same as anything else.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

You can still buy mechanical keyboards, actual they're going through somewhat of a resurgence - there is a dedicated keyboard thread in SH/SC if you want some idea as to what's available

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Lazlo Nibble posted:

Can't speak for universities but yes, mainframes are still common in large businesses, because they're still the most cost-effective way to do the kind of work they do.

Also the costs of migrating off a working mainframe system can be daunting.

The tax department here has budgeted $1.5 billion over ten years for replacing their current system, and this is a country with only around 4.5 million people

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Pilsner posted:

So agreed. gently caress modern laptop keyboards in particular, because you can't just swap them out as with a stationary. There's plenty of room, yet they continue to make them worse. I read an article about Lenovo's new keyboard layout recently, and their argument was basically that they wanted the keyboard to look more "modern". Nothing about usability. Fuckers.

Actually they claimed to have done a bunch of usability testing on the new design: http://blog.lenovo.com/products/why-you-should-give-in-to-the-new-thinkpad-keyboard

Whether you believe it or not is a different matter

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Yond Cassius posted:

Cadillac introduced an infrared HUD for the 2000 model year, but it was expensive (almost $2500) and sold poorly. By 2004 it was selling fewer than 600 units per year, and GM killed the option. Since then a few other manufacturers have tried their luck, to mixed (and usually limited) success.

HUDs were fairly common on late 80s/early 90s Japanese market Nissans. They didn't work particularly well though and were soon forgotten about



If you're really in love with the idea there are cellphone apps that can achieve the same effect if you strap the phone to the top of the dash facing the windscreen

e. probably not the most relevant post to quote

dissss has a new favorite as of 11:01 on Aug 14, 2013

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Flipperwaldt posted:

I guess what surprises me most about it is the precision at which those projectors must run to align all that well enough every loving frame to read it.

There is really nothing to it - because its between the sprocket holes there isn't anything to get out of alignment.

This is a good pic of how its set up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:D...rack_reader.jpg

In the time I worked in a cinema I can't remember ever having problems with the Dolby Digital sound tracks - the tricky parts were the bits and pieces which kept the platters the film is fed off and back onto running in sync, and also when we needed to run the film in two theaters at once (basically the film would feed off the platter, through one projector, then up along the wall into second projection room, through the second projector and finally onto the take up platter)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Zeether posted:

I remember Maddox had an article on why his Nokia kicked the poo poo out of an iPhone because of some of the features back when it first came out.

The thing is it was true when the iPhone first came out. People tend to forget just how limited a device the iPhone was at launch.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

According to wikipedia it was a concept model made by Ericsson:

quote:

Mobile Phone
This was a concept phone designed by Ericsson. The phone had a variety of features, including:
  • a stun gun, containing a 20,000 Volt shock to any unauthorised user, and is also handy at disabling a high tech door lock.
  • a fingerprint scanner/analyser/transmitter that can also be used for opening high-tech fingerprint-identification locks
  • Antennae lock pick, which detaches from the phone and when inserted into a keyhole, hitting a key on the phone can then open the lock.
  • "Flip-open" remote control for operating his BMW 750iL (Directional steering pad, LCD monitor for the front and rear view, controls to fire rocket launcher and operate the car's other defence mechanisms)

Much of the phone's style, including its "flip-open" design, was incorporated a few years later into the Ericsson R380, an early smartphone. The R380 combined a fully functional mobile phone, PDA-like tools and WAP services.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

My old boss had an early Windows cellphone which I'm pretty sure was the same way - dead battery meant all his contacts disappeared.

Great design there.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Code Jockey posted:


e. Man, if you had told middle school me that someday I'd have a 37" flat panel as my computer monitor, I'd have freaked out. I remember a friend of mine's dad had a gigantic 20" CRT for his work PC, and that thing was awe-inspiring. And remarkably expensive if I recall, this being the mid to late 90s.

And you probably still have less vertical resolution than your dad did back in the 90s. Kinda sad when you think about it.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

mints posted:

The release for the trunk is a fairly modern thing, I know on my first car I had a separate key for the doors/ignition and one for the trunk and it didn't have an indoor release (85 Aries).

The 1983 Holden Camira (which I'll add is fairly far up the running for worst car ever) my parents had when I was young had an electrically operated trunk release located in the glove compartment - pretty much the most inconvenient place imaginable.

Japanese cars have had them for longer though, even the early Ford Laser that my mum had had a normal cable operated release by the drivers seat.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Its more like modern stereos are built into the dash in such a way they are impossible to replace without using a mount kit that is more expensive than the stereo itself.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Humphreys posted:

All the integration stuff is annoying as hell. And usually interfacing with the aircon, steering wheel, cluster LCD etc (and through the power of CAN-BUS!).

This reminds me of something that probably should be obsolete, but because of the semi-modern stereo situation isn't yet:



My car was built in that awkward period after easily replaceable stereos but before AUX in became standard. The in dash CD stacker has been dead for years, and the radio will only get Japanese frequencies (only one station around here) but fortunately the cassette deck is still going strong so I can use one of the above adapters to connect my phone

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

I had a Toshiba Satellite 100CDS in high school - Windows 95, Pentium 100, 16MB of RAM and a passive matrix 800x600 display.

Pretty tough little system though, and it actually had the power supply built in (no need for an external brick)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

The older SIMs had a bit bigger circuit area - while going from mini to micro is usually okay I wouldn't want to try and cut my card down to nano size.

As for why you have to remember that phones were giant back when the spec came about so space wasn't an issue, and a credit sized card is much more convenient for carrying about when it's not in the phone

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Horace posted:

Electric windows are terrible, they're so agonisingly slow and often only work with the ignition on. It's not a deal breaker but I'd take the winder any day.


The first part is definitely not true - electric windows are usually a lot faster than manual winders (unless something is wrong with them).

As for manual vs auto - I would prefer an manual but on my car it would have cost thousands more as they're far more sought after in the second hand market (mainly due to scarcity)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Christmas Present posted:

Yeah this is a thing I didn't know until last winter, when I needed to restrict it to 1st gear in order to get out of the snowy uphill that is the only access to my apartment complex.

Serious question - how on earth did you get your license without knowing that?

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Jerry Cotton posted:

Because being able to drive an automatic transmission automobile is not in any way required to get a driver's license?

Surely you should need to know what a transmission is for - its the exact same concept whether your car is a manual or an auto

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Jerry Cotton posted:

No it's not.

Uhh yes it is. Either way there are situations where you need to select a lower gear.

leidend posted:

On the other hand there are no highways in most of Vancouver so manuals are a tedious pain when you have to stop every two blocks.

If you drive one for a week in traffic you won't even notice you're changing gears

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Vanagoon posted:

"Netbust"

I still have an old Optiplex and it's got a Prescott Core P4 in it. The stupid thing is annoyingly slow despite running at 2.8GHz.
POS just sits in the closet of junk most of the time. I probably should just bin it but I like having extra computers around.

My 1.6GHz Merom C2D Thinkpad blows it the gently caress away. (X61 Tablet)

I still have a system with a Pentium D 915 (dual core 2.8 GHz netburst based) and its amazing home much slower it is than the E7400 that replaced it (despite the C2D having less cache and 30W lower TDP)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Also almost every car has a cigarette lighter socket (or auxiliary power outlet in newer cars) and a decent car charger costs less than a CD.

Content: I'm going to say CD changers in general but especially in cars. They're just too mechanically complex compared to a single slot player and are notorious for breaking down (often trapping your six favourite disks).

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Sir_Substance posted:




I find it pretty disgusting that the standard method of building a website requires five different languages (HTML, PHP, CSS, SQL, Javascript). What a god drat headache. The only positive thing I find in the current app craze is people making apps to replace their websites. I am no fan of Objective-C, but writing it once using Objective-C and nothing else makes a lot more sense then the standard website setup.


That isn't really the case though - chances are your app still relies on something running on a server with a database behind it.

Plus you cut yourself out of a large part of the market by targeting iOS only.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Jerry Cotton posted:

Congratulations, you don't like most pre-60s popular music. (Nor a shitload of 60s popular music.)

What's the problem with that?

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Sir_Substance posted:

Depends on what you are doing, of course. Websites run the spectrum from things that could just as easily be a PDF file to things that really should have been implemented in C++. I guess my comment was mostly targeted at the "webapps" market, things like webmail and so forth.

You're right, they do still have a backend, but you've have more flexible choices on what the backend was written in, the interfaces would be simpler and more secure then working with PHP. You'd probably still end up using SQL, but if you could reduce the problem by two languages, that'd be a start.

Getting rid of PHP is, of course, merely icing on the cake

Nothing says you need to use php for a web app either - you have a bunch of different choices there.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

SCART still took less space than the 5x RCA connectors needed for component video + stereo audio

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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I have a really cheap and nasty external hard disk enclosure that uses a short A-A cable

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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It simply couldn't work any other way

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

BIG HORNY COW posted:

I played everything with joysticks, including Interstate 76 from beginning to end with a Thrustmaster FCS.

I miss that thing. I'm pretty sure my parents sold it in a garage sale while I was at school like 10 years ago. We had to call thrustmaster like three times to get replacement springs because I kept wearing them out / breaking them.



I had one of these bad boys


It connected to the gameport (for the stick/throttle) itself an additionally to the keyboard port so arbitrary keystrokes could be sent (you could programme any of the buttons or directions on the many control hats to send macros). I recall the software being an absolute nightmare - made modern Logitech Gaming Studio and similar look like complete paradigms of UI excellence. Think my dad through it out years ago (probably correctly pointing out we'd never have another PC with a gameport)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

The thing I most remember about shooting on a VHS-C camera was how crappy autofocus was back then - it'd hunt before getting the focus right even on high contrast scenes where the subject was stationary. Also on my camera the AF and zoom motors were clearly audible.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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The Twinkie Czar posted:

Even more bizarre, I think that picture is a PCMCIA / compact flash adapter. But think of it as an SD slot in an stock radio in a car from 2011 and it sounds pretty good.

Good thing, too, because that audio system looks like a pain in the rear end to replace.

Lots of mid-late 2000s Japanese market Nissans had CF slots.



You pretty much need to learn Japanese to work the radio though as there is no way of changing the display language (without replacing the entire thing with th setup from a US market model)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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flosofl posted:

I think it's more accurate to say that a GUI interface is less complex, not necessarily less powerful.

Have you seen the state of Microsoft's admin-side UIs lately? Due to the sheer number of options they're very complex, but still don't necessarily expose all the functionality you actually need.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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AlternateAccount posted:

If you were one of those scrubs with an IDE based drive. People with SCSI drives very rarely had to deal with the dreaded BUFFER UNDERRUN.

At an old job I had a parallel port CD writer.

This was a while ago, but not as long as you'd hope (I got a new PC with a proper internal drive in 2005)

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Lord Booga posted:

Then again, we also have a countrywide fibre roll out with a base rate of 30mbit, all the way up to gigabit.

Hah countrywide. I'm like 20 minutes walk away from the Wellington CDB and am stuck on ADSL.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Zaphod42 posted:

That's cool but its kinda silly to pay your carrier to communicate through their towers or require public wifi when your hardware should absolutely be capable of communicating ad-hoc.

Push to talk went through the providers network too though - the only reason it cost less than a proper call was the provider decided it should.

dissss
Nov 10, 2007

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Here's a cat fucking a squid.

Aphrodite posted:

Our debit cards are chip cards actually, swipe cards are deprecated. Several banks also have contactless on their debit cards.

Ugghhh I hate this.

Sometimes it'll go
Present card - won't work
Insert card - won't work
Swipe card - won't work
Insert card - will work this time

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dissss
Nov 10, 2007

I'm a terrible forums poster with terrible opinions.

Here's a cat fucking a squid.

blugu64 posted:

So people without small bills...how do you pay for things like Parking meters, or one of those parking attendants at a sporting event?

I'm in New Zealand's capital and given that street parking costs $1.50 to $4 an hour (usually closer to the high end of that range) this is not an issue - you'd be at the meter forever trying to feed 5c coins in.


1000 Brown M and Ms posted:

Do you mean me?

NZ has $1/$2 coins and everything is rounded to the nearest 10c. So long as you have coins you're fine for parking meters. Not so sure about events where you have to pay in cash, but every food place at sports stadiums etc. have Eftpos machines, and even parking attendants and other people like taxi drivers will have mobile Eftpos machines in their cars/bags/stalls/whatever so there are usually ways to pay for things without cash.

Doing a bit of travelling makes you really appreciate NZ money - the coins are all relatively recent designs so are small and lightweight, and the notes are all fairly durable plastic.

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