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Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

CommunistMojo posted:

Casio makes a kind of competing calculator but I think it's more of TI's having been around for so long that they're the standard. Hell I've never seen a book that gave instructions that weren't for a TI. A few people in my stats class were using casio's for a couple weeks until they just gave up and got TI's because no one knew how to do the functions we needed to do on casio's. I'd love to use my smart phone but I'm at a lovely community college and anyone under the age of 50 with a cellphone out is assumed to be texting. Also the casio's are just as expensive so chalk another one up to american business practices being stupid.

Hello oppositeland!
Back in my days at school here in Norway, everyone used Casios for the exact same reason, the text books all had the stuff for Casios and only a couple of students used TIs. Me and a friend made Snake and Tetris clones on ours, to have something to do in the boring math classes.

I'm also one of the people who rock the Creative NOMAD Jukebox 6 GB (the early discman shaped ones), rad as gently caress at the time, lasted me through a day at school, and then had to be charged for hours before I could use it the next day.
After 3 years with that, I upgraded to the Creative NOMAD Jukebox Xtra 40GB (also mentioned earlier in this thread), and it still works to this day. It's on top of one of my old speakers, and has been hooked to its charger for 7 years now. I stopped using it because some troubles with the audio jack. Also owned some of the smaller Creative Zens, before I got a Zune a couple of years ago. Still love it and use it every day, even with a SGSII with 64 GB memory card filled with music. Mostly because it has a better battery capacity and more awesome games. :P

I have to say, this thread has been a nice flashback for me. Remembering so many of the different things, which either we (as in me and my family) or our neighbours and friends owned.

e: Now that I think about it, I also rocked a Casiopeia with Windows CE 1.0 or something. Found it the other day, turned it on and the bastard still worked. Heck, even the stylus was with it. No idea where the charger is though.

Also, does anyone remember those pagers that came out about 10-12 years ago that was for hip kids and youths? I can't remember what they were called, but only a couple of kids in my town had them, and for half a year, they were some of the most popular kids because of those frustrating gizmos. "You got a cellphone? Well, look at this bitching thing!"

I also remember us having a car phone back in the 90s, and then again a carphone in an Audi my father bought 9 years ago. It wasn't with the standard kit, but he said it reminded him of the old days and payed extra for it. drat bastard worked too, but then again ... Norway.

e: Those pagers that was released for kids / youths, seem to have been in the 90s, and mostly for Scandinavia. They were released by Ericsson and called Mini-Link.

Datasmurf has a new favorite as of 13:32 on Jul 26, 2012

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Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Aidan_702 posted:

All y'all suckaz had the Nokia 3310, but I was the coolest kid with THIS the Nokia 3410.
Yes, you and my grandmas. You were the coolest kids.
Everyone was jealous of my 3310 and my sister's 3330, and I had the school record on Snake II on it. Had it for 4 years, before I got another Nokia, and only because I had the need of storing more SMS and numbers on it.
My first phone was this old beauty though.



The Bosch 509 GSM. Stopped seeing Bosch mobile phones after the 2000s, so I guess it failed. Too bad, it was a nice little phone. Not quite a Nokia or an Ericsson (only the weird, poor kids had Motorola, and they got teased for it too), but not too shabby either.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem



Got one myself.
Some random player from AKAI. With Electronic Shock Protection (really didn't work that well), went through batteries like a regular $250 discman. Had a bass boost and every fancy thing a 14 year old kid. Used it for years, until the hinges stopped working and now it won't play anything at all. Not that it matters, I got my Zune and my Samsung Galaxy SII, so I'll survive, but oh the memories I had with this one. I must've burned 4-500 CDRs with MP3s over the years. For school, mowing the lawn, roadtrips, work, chilling in bed and everything. Good times.

e: Holy titfuck, tables!

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Geoj posted:

Actually, mentioning the pcmods rheobus reminded me - have we touched on DIY PC modding yet?

I got into it about a year before you could buy cases with windows pre-installed on the side (end of the 90s/start of the 2000s.) I spent about three hours with a handheld electric dremel and 1" cutoff discs cutting through the .8mm case side to put that monster in. Thinking back this was literally the coolest thing I had ever seen when I first stumbled on it, and and now its so played out its not even funny.

Oh, this takes me back. I bought a Chieftec Midi tower 8 years ago, and 2 square meters of plexi glass and some rubber listings, and then started with the electric dremel and way too many discs cutting the metal, cutting the plexi glass in the right shape, cutting holes for the fans etc.

Fitted it with some fancy colored cathodes which had the ability to blink to the beat of the music I played (what it really did was just blink at every sound of the bass drum or what sounded like a bass drum, and if it didn't hear anything like it, it just stayed on). It was a smash at parties. I remember lugging around that 20 kg case and an early external HDD filled with my MP3 collection, and having to make sure everyone was very careful around it, because if the HDD was bumped, it crashed.

Good times. Sadly, all the pictures I had of it are gone.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

I remember those. I had a couple as a kid myself, but that was in the late 80s.
I got my parents collections of the discs, and got newer ones myself. They were great. I still have them in a box somewhere.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

lenitic posted:

Teletext was another ancient technology; its high point was beaming a picture of an ejaculating penis through the airwaves into every British household, excused by the caption "Turner the Worm being sick"

Hey now, it's still active in Norway. My maternal grandmother use it often, and I've spent many a day just browsing through it. Sure, it's 15-20 years ago, but hey. If I'm bored and the TV is on, I fire up the old teletext and surf through it. Read the news, see if any of the old games are still active (they usually aren't) et cetera.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Thulsa Doom posted:

I don't think I've seen anyone mention mini casette recorders yet. For some reason, it was a fad when I was in middle school to carry around a tape recorder that used teeny little tapes to record. I used to have a whole stack of them filled with my addled 13 year old dictation, but I have no idea where they went. They were supplanted by digital versions that don't need a tape, and I haven't seen anyone using anything remotely like a personal recorder in years.

My parents have a couple. My mother still uses one these days at work. Taping medical journals or whatever she does with them.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Parallel Paraplegic posted:

Different book as I grew up later, but you reminded me that I still have my original copy of this wonderful thing:

*the way things work*

Those mammoths taught me so much about the world

Oh hey, I had that book too. Also had it on CD, with an upgraded version or something coming out half a year after I got the first one.

And speaking of the thread's theme ... Encyclopedias on CD. I still have Microsoft Encarta 2000 laying around somewhere. It's even less used than our encyclopedias from the early 80s, which I tend to read in whenever I'm bored. Remembering when USSR was a country, as with Western and Eastern Germany, Czechoslovakia and Jugoslavia. "Good" times.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

b0nes posted:

*revolving doors*
Is this being used anymore? I always assumed it was an East coast thing, I cant remember seeing any of these in California.

They're all over Norway at least. Both in malls, airports and at hotels. And I believe I've gone through a couple in hospitals too.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Donkwich posted:

Does Europe still have a lot of paternosters? As an American I've always wanted to ride one, and I guess the reason they haven't brought them to the states is that they are lawsuit bait. Or they're actually dangerous as gently caress. I don't know.
I know we have one in Norway, in a post office in the capital.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem



How about an network card with coax and AUI? I believe both of them are obsolete, and for all I know, failed. I can't remember ever using the AUI port for anything.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Well, I'll be. You learn something new every day.

How about these fancy things I found when cleaning? Sorry for lovely cellphone pic.


A CD with ISDN drivers from Jensen, Grollier Multimedia Encyclopedia for IBMs, Windows 95 demo and Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 Cross Platform Version.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

DNova posted:

Well, ok, how about this for obsolete technology: Telephone Calls.

I live in a small town in the middle of Norway (no where), so no. Also, a lot of people only anwser on their phones and never on e-mail or IMs. It's infuriating at times.

About the old Nokias, still got my 3310. Alive and kicking. I used to bring it to festivals because the battery seemingly lasted forever.

Also, Snake II.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Speaking of floppies. I read a news article the other day about the government here in Norway is giving mllions and millions to hospitals and doctors and people in the health section to upgrade from floppy disks.

When I worked in a hospital 9 years ago, floppies were extinct, but I guess they're still used in all the other ones. :S

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

TommorowComesToday posted:

Alright so I was searching my memory for old stuff I used to have, and I remembered some hilariously terrible computer peripherals:

Quest For Fame - Featuring AEROSMITH!



So yeah, Quest For Fame was an FMV game that was a precursor to Guitar Hero/Rockband/Rocksmith from 1995 that came with a BADASS peripheral called the "V-Pick" which for the goddamn life of me I could never get to work on my 486DX/2. It wasn't until years later on my AMD K6-2 400 that I could even get the drat game to run, and found out it was awful.

Behold! The "V-Pick" in all it's glory!



Yes, this pile of crap I believe terminated in a joystick plug (game controller on an ol-fashioned sound card), but would only work with very few driver sets.

The V-Pick was supposed to be a big introductory piece of equipment set to showcase a big line of games from the developer, and I'm sure we can all guess how much fun strumming a tennis racket in time with music is.


Don't you badmouth the V-Pick. When I was allowed to play Quest For Fame on my father's 486, I was thrilled. I still remember it fondly, and it's aggrivating that I can't get it to run on my computers these days. And the fact that I can't connect the V-Pick to my computer anymore.

I had 3 of them, since I hit them so hard against the tube I was using when playing that I broke the first two after a month of playing.
I can still strum Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild" with my eyes closed and without hearing the music.

So many fond memories. You get out of the garage and into your first bar and this grizzly biker dude comes up to the scene and says "Play Steppenwolf" and you have to play without the helping soundwaves (or whatever they were called).

I loved this game so much, and I still think it's better than Guitar Hero / Rock Band / Rock Smith.
But then again, I've always had a huge boner for everything Aerosmith.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Episodes? As far as I remember, Napster was only for music.
Lots of other stuff for series and cp - if that is your thing - though.

I was the king of our school for having a 2x CD burner and a 128 kbps cable modem, I downloaded and burned out so many songs for people at my school, and earned a fat load of money on it too. Ah, those were the days

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Pilsner posted:

Speakning of burned CDs...

I once got contact with a guy on IRC, him in Holland and I in Denmark. He was apparently a bit of a big time warez and media hustler, and we struck a deal where I sent him a shoebox full of common Magic the Gathering cards in exchange for a ton of stuff on burned CD-ROMs: Applications, games, movies, porn and music albums. We both got our stuff via mail and were happy. So utterly primitive today, though.

Ha ha, I did that at school too.
But instead of a shoebox with MtG cards, it was a tote bag with latex gloves, a speculum, lots of those sticks the doctors use to check your throat, syringes, needles, those things you crap / puke in when you're at a hospital and what not. I got all that stuff for free (well, not the speculum, but nobody suspected me - at least I never heard anything about it), and I got lots of games andapps on burned CDs. Good times.

Taeke posted:

You're right, I had it confused with kazaa I think.

Ah, yes. Kazaa. Or Kazaa Lite, Bearshare, Limewire, Frostwire, iMesh, EDonkey2k, Gnutella and my old favourite after Napster, WinMX. Interestingly enough, I've got the setup exes for all these (except LimeWire, because gently caress that crap). I should really clean up my old misc download folders.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Robot Uprising posted:

I think you where supplying a serial killer.

Well, seeing as we were 10 and 11, I doubt that. He just wanted to be a doctor (he never got that far though, since he got terrible grades all the time and is now working in construction), and he's now happily married and all that jazz. I didn't really care all that much, and hey. "Free" software and games. Yay!

DrBouvenstein posted:

No one ever remembers Scour.

Heh, I knew I forgot one. I just prefered using DC++ though. Untill torrents that is.
I remember we set up a DC++ server in the basement of one of my friends. We all chipped in with some hardware and got to share our warez and pr0n all over. It was great. Untill you dug deeper into what people shared and found CP and horsepr0n. That's when I quit talking to them.

Datasmurf has a new favorite as of 10:15 on Jun 28, 2013

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Ron Burgundy posted:

Audiogalaxy didn't make the list either.

drat, another I forgot. Oh well, didn't use Audiogalaxy quite as much, but I definetly used it.

And since I've been backing up my collection of pirated MP3s since I started with it in '98 (when we got our 128 kbps Cable modem), I still have about 99% of the MP3s I downloaded through shady software for the last 15 years or so. Oh, and going to friends to borrow CDs from them, rip them to wave by using MusicMatch Jukebox and then converting them to 128 kbps MP3s, because gently caress yeah! They take so little sapce! And I only had some crappy Sony knockoff headphones to listen to music anyway, so I didn't really notice the great dip in sound quality.

Which again reminds me of MP3.com. That was the best site to discover new music that wasn't going to be played on the radio here in Norway. I found lots of great bands thanks to that site, even some weird band that came to our school to play. I remember using AllTheWeb (hey, a Norwegian got to use a Norwegian search motor that's awesome for finding MP3s, videos and pr0n, you know) to find out more about them, and lo and behold, I found MP3.com and everything was great. Untill CNet or Vivendi or whoever it was hosed up the site some years later. Oh well, still have some of the MP3s in 96 kbps lying around.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

When we're slightly on the topic of moving files illegaly. Do people still use IRC and DCC for their ?
I remember in 2004 - 2005 when that was really popular here, and all my friends would get permabanned from DALnet, EFnet and Undernet for spamming for the channels.

Good times.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem


Damnit! I used it only some months ago, just for the kicks of it. I liked AltaVista back in the days, before Google. Oh, and Lycos. Is whoever running Lycos shutting that down too?

e:

JediTalentAgent posted:

They've also announced that in another few weeks they're going to start deleting Yahoo e-mail accounts that have been inactive for a year and recycle them, letting new people claim them.

Seems it's time to log in to my old Yahoo account, then.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

nocal posted:

Coincidentally, reporters are obsolete technology.

We are? Dang! And noone ever bothered to tell me.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

ulvir posted:

Teletext is insanely popular in Scandinavia as well. In Norway there's about 1.2 million users every week. Of a population of just over 5 million. There's ofcourse and android and iOS app, and in addition two of our largest broadcasters let you browse their teletext online.

I don't even know.

You can't go wrong with "Tekst-TV" you know.

So many memories of going through every page to try to get to the TV-guide, since my remote never would let me just push in the numbers to go to the correct page.
Also the horrible children sections of the teletect for TV2 and NRK.
XXX parts was okay though. At least for my friends who didn't have access to a computer and a modem to go to Altavista or Lycos to try to find their nude women.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Websites for channels on IRC.
Every channel, be it a little one with one or two people, or big channels for cities and games and what not, had their own websites with channel rules, info about the users and what not. I made a couple of those myself back in the day, but I haven't seen one in years. None of the channels I frequent have one, and most people have no idea what I'm talking about either.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Groke posted:

And every kid in school would trade you tapes with pirated games. Or disks, when those became widespread.

We had our own homegrown fabulous nordic failure of sorts in Norway, as well, the TIKI-100. Also launched in 1984, it was a Z80-based computer with a staggering 64 k of RAM plus 32 k graphic memory; it ran a clone of CP/M called KP/M. This machine was primarily developed for use in schools, by a private company in cooperation with the Ministry of Education. Wasn't really a total failure as such, since it managed to claw out a decent market niche for itself and held onto it for a few years until everyone operating in that niche only wanted PC compatibles instead. (And in fact the company made and sold, for a few years, a successor which was a hybrid TIKI/IBM PC compatible, with both a Z80 and an 8088 processor.)

You know, I had almost managed to forget about the TIKI-100 and TIKI-200. Our school had to suffer with those until the late 90s. :|

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Groke posted:

That poo poo didn't happen until 1992 in Norway. Of course a significant percentage of the population lived close enough to the border to get Swedish channels (and I believe some in the south could get Danish brodcasts as well), but for the rest of us it was one glorious channel. One effect of this was that everyone had seen the exact same shows (if they had been watching TV at all).

In fact I am also old enough to remember when we only had one national radio channel. And if you wanted to get a phone line installed you might have to wait for up to a couple of years. Things have changed rather a bit since then.

Oh yeah, tell me about it. Getting TV 2 was awesome, especially the morning show (much better than the one on NRK, at least for a boring kid like me, and all the amazing American shows that we suddenly got access to )

My aunt had a satelite dish, though, so the few times a year we visited them, I'd either stay glued to the TV screen or being educated in hard rock and Civ 1 (from '91 at least) by my older cousin.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

WebDog posted:

My IT classes were mostly the same. In the Mac years (grades 1 - 6) you were taught how to use HyperCard and Claris programs to do simple documents and games. Or we just messed about in KidsPix, editing all of the owls to have blood gushing out as they rotated their heads.

And then with the upgrades to PCs from grades 7 up, your first lessons were simple "This is a window, this is a minimize button".
One whole lesson was spent getting a hotmail account. Which basically consisted of trying to find an email address that hadn't been taken, as the ISDN slowly loaded the "try again" page.

Later years consisted of creating more word documents, access databases, coding HTML sites, some application with a little turtle you had to program around to move and Flash. Oh and touch typing on some ancient DOS program that was blue and yellow. We were given cardboard boxes to put over the keyboards so we couldn't look at our hands and cheat.

Man, this post takes me back.
When I was a kid in the 90s, my school had some horrid computers from the early 90s which ran 3.1 as late as 1999. We used that drat touch typing program, as it was the only thing we were allowed to run. Most of the kids didn't even care about learning touch. We usually just went to the library where they had a computer with Win 98 which we could surf the web on for 10 minutes before we had to give it up to the next person in line. In other words, if the computer was turned off, it'd be the next guy's turn before you had managed to get into Windows it self.

I do remember having loads of fun with KidPix, though. So much fun that when I found my old floppies with it when I cleaned some shelves last Summer, I reinstalled it. Still fun.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Nyyen posted:

Irritating sound effect bro! My brother and I both had got one of these in white growing up, sometime around 1988:


Each pull of the trigger played a different shooting sound, 9 in total including the three on the Revenger, and the 10th pull would play them all one after another in the most irritating 30 seconds of chip sounds possible. My brother still has his on a shelf in his living room, and it still works using the same batteries that it came with. They were built Tonka tough too and even the stickers have hung on all these years with the only sign of their age has been the plastic yellowing some. I can't track down who made them or anything useful on them since the only text on the entire thing is a little sticker saying "made in China".

I had that same gun in grey, got it in a fishing contest in bumfuck, nowhere in Norway in the mid 90s. Great fun for 3 days, untill my uncle took it from me and smashed it with a hammer and threw everything into the ocean. Guess he got fed up.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

I just can't seem to grasp manual, I've tried to learn it for 12 years now, but it just doesn't go smooth at all. Lots of jerking around. I guess it's not for eveyrone.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Jerry Cotton posted:

Shouldn't have tried it on a BMW they have poo poo clutches

So far I've tried a 94 Ford Scorpio 5d estate, a 97 Ford Galaxy Ghia, a 03 Audi A4 Avant estate, and a Peugeot 308 5d hatchback from the mid 2000s. Still can't handle stick.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

John Big Booty posted:

Some things you block out to protect yourself.

Hey now, there's nothing wrong with Kai's Power Goo. I had loads of fun with that in the ancient times.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Hmm, almost makes me wish that I had tried to fix the old Tandberg reel-to-reels instead of giving them away.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Computer viking posted:

My (second) primary school had a whole lot of these things standing around, probably about 10 year old by the time I got there. I never used them myself, but I know some of the kids that had extra help and one-on-one classes played games on them - probably as a reward. No idea if they where ever used for touch typing classes.

Oh the horror of TIKI. :| My elementary school got 20 of them donated from the municipality, and we had to use them for everything. drat downgrade, especially since we already had 486s in almost every class room (I remember having a cold and not being allowed to go outside between classes, so I just played Action Supercross and Liero on the class 486. Good times. Having to use a TIKI-100 in 1999 is probably one of the worst experiences I've had with computers. Maybe except for being told to install Windows 7 on a 486 for the janitor at the place I worked at a couple of years ago.

Code Jockey posted:

I forget if I posted this in this thread or not already, but it was a fun, fun day when we learned how to use NET SEND on the network in highschool.

For those who don't know, NET SEND allows you to broadcast messages to specific machines on a network... or the whole network, accompanied by a "ding" on any computer with speakers hooked up when the dialog box would pop up.

In high school we overloaded the school network (which for some reason was not separate from the admin / teacher network) with NET SEND * HELLO WORLD in .bat-files. And our IT guy was hopeless and had no idea what was going on. 6 months later we got some weird linux for schools, called "School Linux" (or "Skole-Linux" in Norwegian), which was surprisingly easy to gently caress around with, even if you had almost no skill. This of course ended with me and my classmates shutting down computers all over the place when we were bored.

Good times.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Computer viking posted:

Skolelinux lives on, and is these days also known as Debian Edu. More surprising, they did a lot of the original code for the current debian installer (and a fair bit of work for the linux terminal server project).

Well, I'll be damned. I still don't like it very much. Too many bad experiences, even though it was fun to gently caress up other students.

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Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

Computer viking posted:

* One good thing about being in Norway is that the language is rare enough that the call centers are typically in-country.

What, you actually get to speak to Norwegians when you phone up call centers? All I ever get are Swedes or Indians, or a guy from Scania with a heavy Indian accent. That's actually one of the many reasons why I just stopped using Dell products. Every time I called their support lines, I'd get some outsourced guy I couldn't really understand.

Lurkman posted:

There aren't rose-tinted lenses thick enough to make me look back at the Sierra games with any fondness.
There are for me. Heck I don't even need the rose-tinted lenses, I still love Caesar 3 and Zeus: Master of Olympus, and thanks to GOG, I can play them on a modern system too.

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