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amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


I'm a musician so I'm always on the lookout for old recording gear. Some of my favorites include the reel-to-reel tape recorder:



This old Akai SCSI hard drive recorder (and Casio hardware sampler and synth beneath it):



Here's a couple hardware MIDI sequencers:



While all of these can fill some specific niches they've been replaced with the functionality that a modern DAW and VSTs provides.

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amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


I think it was actually in this fine machine right here:



Which featured incredible classics like this game:

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


b0nes posted:

I want one of these so bad. I had a Casio CZ230S back in the day, and I losted over the "professional" FZ series. One day.

This was a $100 impulse buy for me. The idea was that I was going to sample phrases of my stuff, downsample it and then rerecord it back into a song. Unfortunately there isn't a lot of character in the A/D converters so I never bothered. This does have a couple of other neat features that I also never got around to using namely subtractive and additive synthesis. You can also use something you've sampled as a waveform. These are programmed by assigning values from 1 to 100 on the smallish LCD screen.

Edit: Speaking of that synth you mentioned, I also have a CZ-101 that I got at Goodwill for $10.

amishbuttermaster has a new favorite as of 01:02 on Jul 14, 2012

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


I ran a photo lab for 4 years. Advantix film deserved to die and should stay that way. It's a terrible, terrible format. Most of the cameras that took the film were awful, the resolution of the film was low due it's size and the cartridges were prone to a ridiculous amount of mechanical problems.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


Records that played at 78RPM were phased out sometime in the 40s I believe. Much like with movies it took a long time to standardize playback speeds.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


Cubone posted:

Yes. Kind of. Computers are sufficiently complex that to many people they are basically magic boxes, and if anything's wrong with them you could either take it to a wizard to have the magic put back in, or just get a new one from the magic box company. Because, I mean, gently caress it, you don't know anything about magic.

That's not only hilarious but a pretty apt observation as well.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


Here's another fun musical one: The Roland MC-303 Groovebox. Grooveboxes were in vogue in the late-90s to the first couple years of the last decade. I paid $600 for mine in 1999 and using it was my first real major taste of composition on a full song level. Unfortunately shortly after I got this sucker the far superior MC-505 was released.

These aren't all bad though. The sounds are really dated, even in 1999 but the sequencer was solid and offered a boatload of quantizing and swing options as well the ability to record knob movements in a sequence. Another plus is that it offered X0X style drum programming which I'll always be fond of. For some reason I still own this particular piece of hardware.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


You would be surprised. They were pretty popular with older folks that felt a computer was too complicated and intimidating.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


When I was in IT sales the only way I could get an open account started for a business was to have them fax in a signed purchase order. This went for each and every company I worked for. It's still the norm as far as I know for this sort of thing.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


They basically are. Both are magnetic tape systems. For another example of obsolete technology have a look at the ADAT format:



If you're in a pinch you can use VHS tapes as your recording media. This is yet another recording format that died when DAWs and hard disk recording came to prominence. I've never used ADAT myself but I hear it kinda sucked.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


I'm not sure about how they're doing under Lenovo at the moment but Thinkpads have always been not only hugely successful with both businesses and consumers but they pretty much always featured the cutting edge of what you could cram in a notebook shell. They were never failed not obsolete.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


I wish those had been the more widely adopted notebook pointing devices. I hate touchpads too. I always disable it when I get a new one.

amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


They're really accurate but not to a fault. On top of that it's placed in such a spot that you don't have to take your hands off of the home position for much of anything really. If it's setup like IBM did it's pretty much an efficiency machine.

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amishbuttermaster
Apr 28, 2009


0dB posted:





TASCAM Portastudio One. It records 4 channels to a cassette and you really should use a high quality CrO2 tape. My one worked hard at a college for years on end so it's a little worn. But still - four channels! On a cassette!

I used my somewhat newer Tascam 4-track just a couple years ago to mess around with some drum loops. I programmed the loops and dropped them to the 4-track and then used it's pitchshifting feature (tape speed +/- 30% dial) to drop the pitch and tempo and then recorded them back into Cubase. It was a pretty cool effect.

One of these bad boys. It still works just fine too:

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