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cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.



I work for an arts and crafts store chain and each year we've been consistently reducing our stock. Rubber cement is becoming a fossil before my very eyes.

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cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Landerig posted:

Make a version that will do coffee and that'd be a smash hit over here in the USA.

But coffee makers have had built-in timers for at least 20 years. Just put it on your side table and keep an empty mug in the drawer.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Parallel Paraplegic posted:

Bizarre that they still make them, considering a lot of people don't even wear watches anymore for anything but style, what with atomic-reference-updated clocks on every cell phone and computer screen these days.

These would actually be handy since at work I can't whip out my phone all the time but I still need to coordinate dates with people/services. It would be great if I could just look at my wrist instead of hope I happen to be near a calendar.

e: also so I don't have to spend more than $10 on my watch.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Mister Kingdom posted:

The hospital I work for has one as well.

Doesn't every bank drive-through use this kind of thing as well, just bigger tubes?

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Kwyndig posted:

Those are seeing a resurgence in doctor's offices, because some models can make it impossible for people to read the screen unless you're sitting right in front of it.

I see those in libraries a lot, and once in a mobile phone store where the employees' kiosks were in the middle of the sales floor. It's a great way to maintain privacy and sensitive information.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


leidend posted:

My high school's keyboarding class still used these as of 1997, without the monitor. We also had to re-use bubble sheets for tests, erasing the previous users' answers and hoping it didn't read incorrectly. Horribly under-funded.

I'm guessing bubble sheets are obsolete too now? As are keyboarding classes?

As of 2005, high schools were still using Scantron and their ilk, as well as teaching a basic typing/office suite literacy course.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Non Serviam posted:

What is it? Are they like coupon dispensers?

It's a coupon dispenser. You pull out a coupon and another one pops out, ready to be pulled by someone else who wants tomatoes for 59 cents. I, however, would pull out as many of them as I could and then try to stuff them back in. I'm not sure if I was aware of the damage I was doing to them at the time.

Gosh, I forgot those even existed! It just seems like such an antiquated idea now. Some places might have QR codes now that take you to the store's webpage, or prompt you to install their app, but nothing like a little machine that spits out coupons that little poo poo head kids are going to break all the time.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Guy Axlerod posted:

I can't seem to find any photos or video of them, but in the early 90's American Greetings had kiosks in a number of places where you could create a custom card. The card would then be printed using X-Y pen plotter on card stock. You'd pay about double for the custom card vs an off-the-shelf card.

Of course, home computers and printers eliminated the market.

They were launched in 1992, and were already on the decline in 1996 according to this article: http://articles.latimes.com/1996-06...sonalized-sales

Holy poo poo, I completely forgot about these! I used to gently caress around with the one at my local Albertson's all the time while my dad did the grocery shopping. The appeal is that you could add text and have it printed on to personalize the card. Y'know, instead of just writing in it. It also printed out on one flat sheet with dotted lines telling you how to fold it, so it never folded or sat nicely like a proper greeting card would. They looked like poo poo.

The only two designs I remember it had were Garfield and Ziggy.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Internet Friend posted:

After not having thought about plotters for a couple decades they pop up in this thread; then Massdrop listed a new plotter (the Silhouette Cameo) that also comes with a cutting head for stencils and poo poo the next day. I guess there's still some market for plotters out there.

Go to an arts and crafts store some time. Cricut and Sizzix have been on the market for years, and Cricut has a huge line of cartridges programmed with various designs and fonts you can cut or draw with. They even have one for use on fondant for cake decorators.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


DNova posted:

Probably a lot of people. None of what you just outlined is rare or complicated.

The only things I play music out of anymore are my computer, my phone, and my car. If I want to do housework, I already have wireless headphones that reach everywhere in the house. I have no way to play the tapes I still have or to make new ones if I wanted to.

The last thing I had that could even play tapes was my old Saturn Vue and even then the tape deck was solely used for the audio-in converter thing. I would be getting my kids the cheapest MP3 player I could find and let them know if they break it then they're just hosed. It would be cheaper in the long run too when you factor in buying blank tapes, equipment to make new tapes, and all the batteries they'll burn listening to a walkman.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Horace posted:

Electric windows are terrible, they're so agonisingly slow and often only work with the ignition on. It's not a deal breaker but I'd take the winder any day.

And what if you have to roll down a window that isn't the one you're sitting next to? There are plenty of times I've needed to talk to someone at a light who was on my passenger side, or wanted to only open the rear windows. My two most recent cars even have an "auto" mode where one tap of the button automatically puts them all the way down if I want. I had manual windows on my first car and it was the biggest pain in the rear end; the novelty of rolling down my windows without having to turn on or start the car isn't worth much.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


"Come" and "cum" are pronounced exactly the same. Sorry about your embarrassing speech impediment, bro.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


"Scuzzy."

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


As a kid, the Scuzzy/SCSI thing is the only joke I really got on Reboot because my dad had gotten this bomb-rear end family computer and was talking about all the features.

I think it was when I got a gameboy and saw "dot matrix" above the screen that it clicked and I realized every loving thing in that show is some technology pun.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


WebDog posted:

Hyperland, starring Douglas Adams and Tom Baker as a search engine butler.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iAJPoc23-M

Very wrapped up in the early 1990's multimedia boom and focuses on interfaces such as Hypercard as well as Xanadu and in a way (though not really as flashy or dripping in VR) gets it right regarding the concepts of of world wide web that was just on the horizon.

The whole thing is presented as a sort of interface that's explored by Adams, and it is an interesting look at how to not design fancy and distracting elements. It also has the cute term M-icons, which means icons that animate and talk over you.

I love the emphasis on virtual spaces the early 90s was obsessed with. Nobody could predict that 20 years in the future... we still don't want to walk through virtual museums and look at virtual exhibits. We just want to look poo poo up on Wikipedia, which is visually less impressive than a CD-ROM ~interactive multimedia~ encyclopedia.

That pale death mask they had to change the lighting on because it was "too realistic" was a hoot, too. Who'da thunk in 20 years we'd have every gross pore in Kiefer Sutherland's face mapped and modeled as part of a video game?

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


All of those tapes are sitting in a landfill somewhere right now.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Dick Trauma posted:

I was reading a magazine article (that's not the obsolete technology in question) about 3D printing and it reminded me of a device I first saw back in the 1970s.

Behold... the MOLD-A-RAMA!



For a quarter the machine would make a hot wax model of various things, in this case a miniature Hollywood Bowl. The one I saw at Universal Studios would make a wax shark (Jaws tie-in) or a movie monster, like Frankenstein's head with a slot for coins.



The models were still warm when they came out and you had to be careful with them as they were soft until they cooled. They were thin-walled as well and prone to crumbling.



I saw one of these at a zoo that had a choice of animals! I had completely forgotten about it but I thought it was neat at the time. My parents thought it was a waste of money so I never got to see it in action.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Super Waffle posted:

I've had to dial the area code for even local numbers since the mid 90's, is this not a thing everywhere? I thought the distinction between "long-distance" and "local" calls (aside from international calls) was obsolete technology

I grew up in an area where you didn't have to dial the area code, then moved to one where you did. It became so ingrained in me that even when I moved back I still instinctively dial the area code and give mine when people ask for my number.

With mobile phones not needing to stay where they were issued and still get service, you often get people with area codes from around the country. The only time I don't hear people giving their area code with the whole number is either old people or local businesses on the radio.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Safety Meetings posted:

The one in canada is called ePost, it's actually handy as I can have bills forwarded to my bank so they get paid automatically.

I'm seeing this kind of thing a lot in this thread. Can you not set up your bills to be automatically charged to a card or checking account electronically? Everybody who sends me a bill just charges my debit card or a credit card on the due date and don't bother sending paper bills anywhere. Even a pissant little town in Texas let me pay power and cable automatically and that was 8 years ago.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Tubesock Holocaust posted:

In general practice, you won't find anything bigger than a $20 in ordinary everyday transactions. Outside of banking transactions, I haven't seen a $50 bill in months, nevermind a $100 bill.

You must not work retail. I count money for a largish retail chain and see fistfuls of each every day.

I wish they were obsolete so we would stop getting assholes coming in 2 minutes after opening on a Monday trying to spend hundos.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


What is the oldest known porno? Are there skin flicks that are 100 years old already or do we need to wait a decade? Were 1920s porno theatres classy joints where you'd drink a brandy alexander and not remove your gloves while cranking it?

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Tubesock Holocaust posted:

Before there was a card swipe machine at every register, there was this:



I haven't seen one of these in years.

Per SOP, every store in my company has to have one of these, including the one we opened up just this February. I've never seen anybody use it, I've worked in a store that just threw it the gently caress out because who cares, and my current store doesn't even have the carbon tickets you're supposed to use with them so it's completely useless. Not to mention-

Sir Unimaginative posted:

2) They're going to be not just obsolete but useless soon, now that they're heading toward financial account cards with the information screened or sublimated under the protective layer, rather than embossed.

I see a lot of cards do this. My girlfriend's debit card is smooth plastic with the numbers printed on the back. Even if we had the stupid tickets these things have been nothing more than awkwardly-shaped dust collectors for a decade or more. Hell, we have cashiers who were born after the last time I remember seeing these things in action! I've had to explain to them what it even was and why someone would need it, and these are kids in college.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


SLOSifl posted:

I don't want to carry a bunch of loving coins around.

I barely carry any cash these days anyway, but having a few small bills is handy, while I literally never take change anywhere but the bank or a coinstar.

Stop being such a drat baby that you might have to carry up to four (4) coins in your precious raw denim jorts.

US money is getting more colourful and visually interesting but I wish we'd go whole hog and have bright neon colours and polymer notes. And maybe I've just been lucky, but I've never encountered a soda machine that wouldn't take my dollar coins at value.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


SubG posted:

That article is from 1948, but it's even older than that. The first commercially produced and successful typewriter was introduced in the 1870s, and there are surviving examples of typewriter art from the 1890s. E.g., from Pitman's Typewriter Manual published in 1893:





It warms my bitter heart to know the ASCII art in GameFAQs is the continuation of a century-old tradition.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Phanatic posted:

Is Siri really the example you want to use there? I don't think I've ever successfully used it for anything completely non-trivial. It can't find me the nearest coffee shop along my route, it can't find me a public parking lot in Ocean City, it's not hooked in to the platform's other flagship apps (Like, "Siri, rate this song 4 stars" should actually be a thing, as should "Siri, add this song to [playlist name].")

Does anyone think Siri's anything more than a gimmick? What do you use it for?

I use Google Now when I'm driving so I can do stuff like send texts or find directions. It would be great if it could do more stuff in non-Google apps besides just opening them. Even some Google apps don't have great control; if Maps found a faster route I can't tell it to switch over by voice, I have to tap the screen.

e: voice controls will never be 100% until my devices acknowledge when I instinctively thank them for helping me. I still do it but a "no problem" would be nice.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Jmcrofts posted:

After you own a smartphone for a few months you'll quickly forget why you were so opposed to getting on in the first place.

"Heh, why would I ever need a smart phone? My Nokia is great, I can text super fast on it, it fits right in my front pocket and the battery lasts for days with typical use. I bet I'd never use the internet features anyway. " -Cobalt shortly before being given a Galaxy S2 to replace her 6650

I still hate having to charge the goddamn thing every day, though.

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Last Chance posted:

Used to rock this bad boy for a little while mid last decade:



This was my first phone. My mother handed it down when she upgraded. The thing was a beast and I had it for years, only replacing it when I wanted a phone with a camera and got a Nokia 3200. I really hated the downgrade in reception with switching to an internal antenna. Now I don't even give a poo poo about phone reception, I buy mobiles to be a pocket computer that can make calls if I absolutely have to.

cobalt impurity has a new favorite as of 02:31 on Aug 6, 2015

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


Slanderer posted:

3. Of course an otterbox case makes it unreasonably big. I have no idea why anyone would use one for everyday use.

I have a Galaxy S3 in a Commuter otterbox and it fits just fine in the back pocket of my tight jeans and in the front pocket of my khakis (because they only have fake back pockets, the fuckers )

cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


dissss posted:

Whenever someone posts the 'Nokias are indestructible' meme I feel like I'm missing out on something. I've had a bunch of different Nokia models over the years and without exception the hardware was garbage - either the keys would stop working (removable faceplate models) or the slide/flip mechanism would wear out.

Yeah this is the first time I've heard of someone having problems with Nokia hardware. The worst Nokia phone I had was a 3200 and it still managed to survive the entirety of a wash of clothes while powered on. I kept using it for months but eventually the ringer volume got lower and lower until it was dead silent and I kept missing calls.

The 6102 I replaced it with was an absolute monster and even with chunks of the plastic breaking off it still worked like a charm and I loved it. I only replaced that because I could get a slimmer profile Nokia for free with the family's upgrade plan.

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cobalt impurity
Apr 23, 2010

I hope he didn't care about that pizza.


A FUCKIN CANARY!! posted:

Man, I hated the days before we had LEDs all over our electronics and it was impossible to tell whether or not your TV was on.

I had the opposite problem. I could never tell when my drat television was off! But thankfully the eggheads down at Samsung were kind enough to include a bright red LED on my set to let me sleep in comfort that my TV is, in fact, off in standby.

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