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El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Parallel Paraplegic posted:

Also at every swapmeet ever you find those ones that look like N64 controllers that play NES ROMs that are totally not illegal.

These are instantly recognizable to anyone who read video game magazines in the early to mid 00's. Basically the guy responsible for making and importing them got smacked down hard by Nintendo's legal department and as part of the settlement had to take out huge page and half page sized ads in pretty much every video game magazine featuring his mugshot and what crimes he had committed.

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El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


You wanna talk old computers? I learned DOS on two old Toshiba Packet Sniffers. Those things retailed new for a huge amount of money and had that odd Asian card slot RAM. Yeah, thats right, RAM in what was basically a PC Express slot.

Those things are loving beasts, they still work today and have better LCD displays than a lot of modern laptops I've used (this is why they were so expensive). More impressively, its a pre-1995 computer that can run Liero with little to no slowdown.

It used to have a build of 311 on it, but I deleted it as a teenager to fit more games on my 50 pound suitcase sized laptop (did I mention it was portable? It was in a very technical sense).

Toshiba posted:

The ultimate Power Portable
The Toshiba T6600C is the Power Portable that can meet even specialist's needs. Just look at the processing power - an Intel 486DX2 with an internal clock speed of 66 MHz, 8 MB memory, expandable up to 40 MB, and a 510 MB hard disk expandable to an unprecedented storage capacity of 1 GB. This is the sort of muscle you'd expect from a high-end desktop, not a portable. The T660OC's expansion capabilities are just as impressive. Two 16-bit full length ISA slots, one Type III PCMCIA 2.0 slot and an internal and external SCSI-2 port make the T6600C the complete connectivity system for today and tomorrow.

The website for it is a loving goldmine of hilarity.

http://www.toshiba-europe.com/compu...600c/index.shtm

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Manfrompoot posted:

Weren't the first Dreamcast copies made through some convoluted method where they had to transfer the GD-ROM contents from the disc through the modem? Also, early Dreamcast copies generally had lower-quality audio or tracks missing entirely so they could cram everything onto a CD-R.

The issue is that the DC uses a gigabyte sized disc and a standard CDR is 750mb. Most games are in the 400-650 range and fit fine on a standard CD but any game that actually used all the space (Shenmue II for instance) would have to be cut down. The easiest way to do this is by replacing the music files since they are usually uncompressed WAV files in a directory on the disc.

Before SEGA left the console market and there was a definite chance they would beat the PS2 Sony was planning to release a format of, you guessed it, burnable gigabyte discs. The DC was already having huge piracy issues, especially in Asia where the companies who were pumping out pirated VCD movies/porn were using the same equipment to steal DC games. So this was probably the only time in history a company has planned to kill another companies console by making it easier to pirate games on the competitors machine.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


univbee posted:

Those who take their fighting games extremely seriously can usually get joysticks that precisely recreate the button layout in an arcade cabinet; I've seen joysticks like this go for in the $400 range.

Try like 500 to 600 minimum.

But yeah, I wouldn't consider Fight Sticks to be obsolete, more people own them then ever before and they're used for a genre of games that has become extremely popular in the last decade.

Also your statement is slightly incorrect. Almost commercially available arcade sticks are recreations of an arcade layout. The most common are the SEGA layouts and as of late the Namco Noir layout has been more popular along with a very small segment of people who use the "straight" six layout popularized by American SF2 cabinets. What makes expensive sticks expensive is that they have a large amount of custom electronics work done to them along with woodworking, plexiglass cutting, and art printing to create the casing. Not to mention just the buttons, lever and internals are a about a hundred bucks on their own. Its a huge problem IMHO when it comes to fighting games these days, the barrier to entry is too high even if you buy used (always do this when getting sticks) and even if you take the most economical route to getting a "good" stick (ie one with decent buttons and a good quality stick that wont drop inputs or break) its still about sixty or seventy dollars and that requires some pre knowledge or someone telling you what to do (get a PS1 Namco stick or a Dreamcast ASCII and run it through a converter!).

My stick for instance has a custom painted wood box, two etched panels in the bottom of it, buttons that have gold leaf in them, braided cables, LED's that light up when a button is pressed, a custom dust washer and Joystick ball in addition to being able to work on both the PS3 and Xbox 360 (which is a expensive operation if you only want to use one cable because Microsoft doesn't use standard USB drivers like Sony does). poo poo is expensive.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


I would definitely say that up until very recently those old style joysticks that use the rubber membrane to center themselves were pretty much obsolete. But now all the major Tekken and Soul Cal players swear by them so they're starting to come back in a big way.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


NonzeroCircle posted:

That is a thing of beauty man, if you don't mind me asking, how much did it cost to build in the end?

Well it was always pretty much my favorite custom stick I'd ever seen when it was built, so when the guy who originally owned it sold it I bought it from him almost instantly. I paid a bit over 200 USD for it, and I think it cost him about 650 or 700.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Scionix posted:

wait what? You can get a really nice EightArc for like ~220 dollars tops and a madcatz TE stick will only run you around a hundred.

I'm talking high quality custom sticks not commercially made ones. Eightarc and Madcatz make good sticks (I own a TE-S and it works quite well, for instance) but there is a big gap between something like an Eightarc Fusion and stuff made by these guys:

B15DSM




Tek Cases


Souji


Shadaloo

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Yonic Symbolism posted:

Alan Moore, nooooo

I hate to break this to you, but Alan Moore is into a lot of weird kinky victorian sex stuff. He wrote a terribly unerotic porn comic called Lost Girls that was 100% classic children's novel characters from that era loving.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Manky posted:

The iPod photo.


Click here to view the full image

It was the first iPod to feature a color screen, and its only real selling point was the ability to sync your photos with your computer. (Though the idea of having cover art for music was personally more appealing.) Oddly, it was actually a distinct iPod line, like the mini or the nano. But it only saw one minor revision in its brief nine month lifespan before the line was killed.

The next summer it was made completely obsolete when Apple released the fifth generation iPods, colloquially known as the iPod video, now referred to as iPod classic.

But you know what? I love that weird little machine. It's eight years old, and last week I synced mine with my computer and set it up in the kitchen as a jukebox. The battery is down to about 30 minutes, but both the battery and the HDD are original, and I'm impressed they're operational. I'd say that's Nintendium level build quality.

This was actually much better than the small 5th gens. Basically the 30 gig 5th gen had an issue where the battery was too close to the hard drive, so the heat from the battery would slowly corrupt the drive over the course of about two years. Its why they have such bad skipping and pausing issues as well. The 60 and 80, and later the Classic got rid of this problem but those 30 gig 5ths were some real lovely ipods.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Zemyla posted:

Jesus Christ, the U key really looks like a Goatse.

For content, I remember having a Speak and Spell or something very similar. It quizzed me on math and spelling and stuff. I'd ask whether these were obsolete, but things like the LeapPad are being produced.

Dis the OG edutainment device:

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Jedit posted:

I had one of those. I'd forgotten it until you posted it.

It's because they are incapable of producing emotions higher than "tepid boredom".

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Not to mention that during the 90's when the home market was really killing Arcades sales the push for better, faster, and stronger everything put huge strain on the monitors and the people making the games weren't taking that into account because they needed to have the best possible looking thing on the market. So you have poo poo like the X-men game were the left screen is ALWAYS burned out compared to the right screen because of all the crazy strobing effects they crammed into the bosses.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Krispy Kareem posted:

Speaking of RAM, remember sim expanders? Since Pentium computers needed ram in equal pairs upgrading could be a real hassle if you wanted to keep any of your old sticks. Enter sim expanders. Put your new 32mb stick in one slot and 2 16mb sticks in the other.

My Toshiba laptop which I mentioned earlier in this thread has whatever the Japanese competitor to SIM RAM cards was.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


two forty posted:

How about Weather Underground's Telnet service?



I am sure this still has some practical use but I can't figure out what exactly it is. It was a relic when I first stumbled across it in 2003.

TelNet clients run on pretty much anything including a lot of very low power devices. In some rural areas in the US and Canada its the only reliable way to get weather reports that aren't over satellite TV.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


I used to use the Strategic Commander for DotA back in the day. It's really good for that because you could macro all your characters abilities and items in the time before DotA had the whole standard QWER setup like it does now. You could probably still use it for modern DotA and League of Legends but I don't know if they still support using the arrow keys to move the map which is what made it useful for RTS and MOBA games.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


I'm pretty sure KTV was a generic brand used by some dealerships. There is a TV made by them in my friends Chevy Van 20 that was installed by the dealership whenever the previous owner bought the car sometime in the mid 80's.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Kazaa started out as a great program but then when it went all spyware it forked into Kazaa Lite. Of all those WinMX is probably the most important since it (along with the work of Ian Clarke) influenced and gave birth to all the modern P2P clients through its unofficial successor WinNY and later WinNY's unofficial successor Perfect Dark.

These are mostly used in Asia however, where WinMX and WinNY still have huge fanbases and piracy through torrenting isn't as common. I'm pretty sure this has a lot to do with certain Asian countries being really terrible at adopting new operating systems. Back in 09 I used to deal with people from Korea, Taiwan, China and Vietnam on a pretty frequent basis and the amount of people who would show up complaining they couldn't run some software for their class due to them running WINDOWS ME was insane. I don't know what it is about ME but that was where half of the Asian student populations computer problems stemmed from.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Laptops have no appeal to me at this point. Any casual internet use I can do from my phone and so if I'm going to have a dedicated box for playing games and watching movies it better loving anything on the retail market. Plus there aren't really any laptops that pack as much RAM or as good a graphics card as my desktop, I'm sure some specialty company like Falcon Northwest might but I haven't ever seen one.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


The 500XJ isn't the same as the Speedking. The Speedking gets its name because its technically the 500XJ Speedking, the designation was to note that it had an autofire function.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


The best example would be old style American Arcade Buttons. They use the same type of Cherry switches most mechanical keyboards do. That really satisfying click that accompanies hadoukening a dude can now be how you type everything. Also you mistype a lot less since it's pretty hard to apply the amount of force required to depress a button on accident.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Ron Burgundy posted:

The PS/2 adaptor and missing keys for my 1989 Model M rocked up a couple of weeks ago.

I will never again use anything else.

Fortunately it can last indefinately due to Unicomp (the people who bought the rights for the Model M from IBM) still offering repair services (along with new keyboards).

http://pckeyboard.com/page/category/Repair

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Geoj posted:

^
Video editing is pretty much the only thing I can see it being actually useful for and not easily replaced with something that isn't a unitasker.

Can you give it a good turn and it will continue to spin until you stop it or it runs out of momentum minutes later?

It's a straight up Rheostat.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Collateral Damage posted:

Wasn't the Acorn designed as a school computer? On that topic we have another fabulous nordic failure.

The TeleNova COMPIS. COMPIS meant "COMPuter In Schools", but is also a play on words, the swedish word "kompis" meaning friend.



The state-funded project was launched in 1981 and the idea was to in two years develop an expandable, easy-to-use computer that could be used in various fields in school. So it would have ports for a light pen, a general IO port, support for various science instruments etcetera. It should also have a high-resolution (the spec called for minimum 500x500 pixels) screen capable of showing color images. And it had to be cheap.

Esselte developed the computer, which was then produced by TeleNova, a spinoff from the state telephone company Televerket. It wasn't a bad machine for its time. Based on an 8Mhz Intel 80186 CPU, it had 128kB RAM (expandable to 256) and an additional 32kB video RAM. The graphics adapter was capable of displaying 640x400 in 8 colors, although the basic model came with a proprietary monochrome CRT, which also served as the power supply for the computer. Very few of the color monitors exist.

So why did it fail? The same reason so many other promising hardware projects fail - timing and software. After a year long delay the computer reached the market in 1984. By then MS-DOS had the personal computer market in an iron grip. Along comes Compis running CP/M and a proprietary programming language called COMAL. Imagine a sad trombone here.

Eventually the ability to boot MS-DOS from floppy was added, but by then the hardware was obsolete and the Compis destined to be a parenthesis in computer history.

Not to mention if you were in Europe and you wanted to get a cheap computer in 1984 the C64 was everywhere, inexpensive and megapopular.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Collateral Damage posted:

An ex colleague of mine was disappointed in the battery life of his phone, so he jury rigged an external battery pack (wrapped in brown packing tape) attached to the back of the phone. Not a bad idea, except the whole thing looked like a phone with a block of C4.

I suggested he never try to take it flying.

When I was taking a security course one of the speakers talked specifically about how many commercial and almost all home made batteries are pretty much indistinguishable from explosives on many scanners.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Minidiscs were really popular with Podcasters and reporters for a while just because the recording quality on them was amazing. You could drop one of the 200ish dollar recorder/players onto the middle of a table and pull audio that would have otherwise required you to whip out a laptop, audio mixer and several really nice microphones.

Then technology caught up, laptops have good sound cards and high quality mics are very affordable.

Also I liked minidiscs because they were cheaper than MP3 players and had better sound quality than MP3 CD's.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


ravenkult posted:

What's the most cyberpunk obsolete tech you got?

While technically not obsolete I have a bit of cyberpunk that's not needed to be used anymore. It's a set of Bump Key Dies, basically metalworking patters that let you cut blank keys for the purpose of lock picking. These days a set of bump keys is like 5-25 dollars depending on what range of lock manufacturers you want.

I guess people use circle picks as well since a thing that helps you break into poo poo will always be useful. But I mostly use mine when I do freelance work to show people how unsecured their locked file cabinets are. But I feel that whole culture of handcuff and lock picking is pretty much a 90's cyberpunk relic. What other culture of modern tech done by nerds is taught to you by a rail thin long haired Norwegian man at a folding table during a convention (I kid, I kid, the European lock pick dudes are doing amazing poo poo with 3D printers these days but still).

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Code Jockey posted:

Oh my god that looks awesome, thank you!

Also, one thing that I was thinking about last night while playing GT5: I would kill for a way to simulate the "feel" of driving a car. Like sure there's force feedback in the wheel itself, but that's reeeeally lacking. I wish there was some way to feel the shift in weight when braking / cornering, feel the bumps in the road, feel it when you lose traction, etc. You make a simulating chair like that to go with GT5/ GT6 / BeamNG / whatever, and I would give it some serious thought [and never, ever be able to afford it, I'm sure]. I see a lot of "cockpits" and seat rigs that are just meant to attach wheels [and sometimes TVs] to, but nothing with any kind of physical feedback.

This is why, despite the Dreamcast version being arcade perfect, nothing can beat Hyrdro Thunder in the actual arcades.

Edit: Forza's head tracking is pretty awesome on the Kinect, and if we could get that in a Xbox One game with a steel battalion like controller I would actually buy the XB1.

El Estrago Bonito has a new favorite as of 22:01 on Feb 9, 2014

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


I do a lot of work on Arcade Sticks, as I've mentioned previously in this thread. And one thing I really like is that, for the most part, control interfaces have remained pretty standard in the meat and potatoes departments. It's nice that if someone brings me a stick they bought in 1989 for their NES that they are really attached to I can make it work on their PS3 with like 20-30 bucks of parts, work and solder. I really can't wait for home PCB fab equipment to come down in price. I've talked to some guys who live in Shenzhen, PRC and apparently there are a lot of guys who just have setups they've cobbled together in apartments and storage units from random old pieces of equipment they have bought cheap or salvaged. 3D Printing IMHO is kinda masturbatory and not terribly useful these days on a "have one in my home" scale but a PCB fab that could actually make really cool stuff would be straight up awesome.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Up until the mid 2000's a lot of kids stuff STILL came on cassette tape, so it's not unlikely that her parents had and used them. I know when my friend worked at a childrens resale store they still sold and bought a ton of tapes because between the mid 80's and mid 90's there was just so much stuff made for kids in that format and parents today still want to get stuff like Lambchop and Wee Sing that they remember from their childhoods (a lot of which is/was only available in tape form). This goes double for religious parents where many if not most Christian bookstore type places still have extensive tape selections. Also if your kid is 8 and wants to walk around listening to music a tape player is like 5 dollars and some random Beatles tapes from goodwill are like fifty cents. It's not like your kid is going to care a lot about audio fidelity and you as a parent don't have to worry about them breaking a hundred dollar MP3 player when they fall off their scooter or run through a sprinkler.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


minato posted:

It should be a legal requirement for the programmers to eventually reveal How The gently caress They Did That.

http://youtu.be/L8onlB0F1_A

poo poo so cash.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Zemyla posted:

Wasn't that from Sochi?

And are those alligator clips?

Looks like quick disconnects to me.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


serious norman posted:

What kind of video calls do you do in your shed?

One's where he shows people his tool(s), duh.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


TerryLennox posted:

Hehehehehe, this brings back the old days. When There was no Pentium M and if you wanted to build a gaming laptop you had to use Pentium 4 Mobiles which was basically a desktop processor on a laptop package.

http://books.google.com.pa/books?id...0mobile&f=false

These abominations cost more than a Salarian testicle transplant and would probably make you sterile if you set the machine on your lap.

Not as bad as the time period where they tried to put the 9800M into everything as a video card. That card runs somewhere between the heat levels of "Unceasing Hellfire" and "Raging Inferno of the Damned". Pretty much every company was throwing huge piles of money at Nvidia for those things and then the computers they were in would last like a year tops because they would get burned out by how hot the card was. Rumor has it that its one of the things that made them go and make their current generation of mobile cards run so cold and ALSO what drove AMD to make the whole GPU concept.

Heat and laptops don't mix. Not even Apple was smart enough to realize this ("Lets make a computer that has a really hot graphics card and processor and have it use the body as a heat sink!"). But Jobs has had a long history of not caring about heat. One of the early Apples had no fans because Jobs hated fan noise, so it got so hot inside of it that it would warp the plastic and unseat the RAM and other components.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


GWBBQ posted:

Was that the one that got so hot it would desolder the processor?

I dunno if it could desolder anything but it definitely burned through all the thermal grease on my friends Asus laptop. That laptop was a piece of poo poo (the G50V) it had a false fan on the bottom of it, and pretty much every problem with the drat thing could be solved by drilling some holes through the false vent. I'm not sure why Asus didn't do this themselves, since, uh, THE MAIN FAN FROM THE loving PROCESSOR BLOWS DOWN RIGHT INTO THE FALSE VENT. It also had terribly inefficient heat piping in it where it redirected all the heat to the fan that was supposed to be exhausting heat from the video card. His 6 year old daughter used to put her stuffed animals right next to the vent because it would heat them up to like ~100+ degrees and the fan exhaust once melted a bag of whoppers that was about six inches from the computer into a solid lump.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


Minidiscs were really popular for Podcasting back when good quality microphones were more expensive. You could toss a minidisc recorder in the middle of a table and get pretty drat good audio (way better than with a laptop from the time period). Later prices on all that kind of gear came down significantly and now you can get a set of Podcast quality microphones and all the stuff to hook them up to computers along with popstoppers and such for less than five hundred, but back when Minidisc was in its heyday it was probably triple that.

Also minidiscs were a lot more expandable than iPods at the time. Your average iPod was like 300+ dollars for ~30 gigs of storage and a minidisc player was cheaper and you could basically expand it at will, so instead of having to lay down a bunch of money for 30 gigs of storage you just had to buy more discs when you needed to convert more albums.

They also had far superior bitrate to a lot of cheap MP3 players (hell, even the iPods and Creatives) and burning minidiscs was a lot easier than using some of the loving awful programs you had to use for MP3 players. No they have been made obsolete not by any MP3 players but by microSD cards in cellphones that pretty much preform the same stuff for cheaper. See also: that short period of time when companies kept trying to make MP3 players that plugged onto the top of thumbdrives.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


I know security guys who use Dialocs because they actually avoid many of the common brute force attacks that work on a lot of key locks. They do suffer from the weakness of most door locks, which is that no matter what kind of insane $300 lock you put on your door, most household door frames break easily if someone kicks them or smacks them with a relatively small heavy object. The Simplex however has a really simple picking attack IIRC that targets the key backup making the actual dial method pretty obsolete.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

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The SEGA one's were bright pink and fingerless except for the thumb.

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

Scout Finch Bitch


DrBouvenstein posted:

That was college for me. 2000-2004.

My school had a "laptop program", so every incoming student had to either buy a laptop from the school or bring one that met the specs,. Most bought from the school, which were Thinkpads (I think my incoming class had T20s? it was back when IBM still owned the brand.) They had a floppy drive, but it was a unit that was "hot swap-able" with the CD drive. Technically. These things ran Windows 98, so "hot swapping" was a misnomer. You always had to make sure to go into the control panel and tell it to eject the drive, and then, and only then, could you remove the CD drive and put in the floppy. And even then it would still sometimes freeze up, or not recognize the drive. It was pretty much always best to save whatever you were doing and shutdown to swap it.

By about my sophomore year, most people's floppy drives stopped working, but it was still too soon for flash drives to be a "thing" (I remember seeing ads for them in things like TigerDirect, and it would be like $40 for a 10MB drive, and no guarantee it would work on any computer you plugged it into, so you'd have to also have a floppy or CD drive wit the drivers, etc...)

For the most part, we'd email our assignments to the professor or TA, but I was an engineering student, so sometimes I've had a large collection of (sometimes very large) files for a project that was too big to email. The laptops they provided us with only had CD drives, not CD-R drives, so the solution was either store them on your shared network drive and use one of the computers in the computer lab to burn it to a CD, or go out and buy your own external CD-R drive. I chose the latter, since I lived off-campus. But man, that thing was FLAKY. It came with the worlds shortest USB cable, like less than a foot, and warned to NEVER use a cable extender or USB hub. And since these were oh-so-modern laptops, they also had a whopping 1 USB port, and no PS/2 mouse port (though they did have a PS/2 keyboard port, for some reason.) They also only had a nipple/clit mouse, which I hate, which I guess makes me weird her in goon-land, as all I ever see are praises for clit-mice. Mine started "drifting" tot he right within the first few months I had it.

That generation of thinkpad has a base station deal that adds extra ports. I just threw one out yesterday. Best laptops from the win 98 era were those Sony VIAO 505's that were small as gently caress. I had one and it weighed maybe 1 pound and was less than half an inch thick. It was so small that to plug it into a modem you had to use a pop out port because the body of the computer was too thin to have one.

El Estrago Bonito has a new favorite as of 18:39 on Nov 25, 2014

El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

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Zombie Chow posted:

Speaking of cables, I wonder why s-video never really took off, and most general-use electronics still use those crappy RCA cables

In the US Component was better and in Europe they had SCART which is (usually) superior or at least of similar quality.

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El Estrago Bonito
Dec 17, 2010

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GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

S-video makes your SNES, N64, and PS1 games crisp as hell on a decent CRT

It's OK but any good CRT that has an S-video hookup (Sony PVM or similar) will also have hookups for RGB over component and that will make your poo poo look waaaaay better.

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