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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Inspector_71 posted:

I tried setting my HDs to cable select once but I think my mobo didn't support it and I was crushed. Then SATA happened.

I remember this... the motherboard probably supported it, you just needed to set both drives on that IDE cable to CS and use a cable that supported cable select, you could always tell because the connectors were different colors or there was a hole punched in one conductor (pin 20, I think?) that set things properly.

As for my favorite obsolete/failed technology... hard sectored floppy discs.

Basically in a floppy disc (5.25 and 8" at least, I believe they eliminated it for 3.5" discs) there's an index hole that is viewed by a sensor in the drive, it goes by once per rotation of the disc and indicates that the first 512 byte sector of data on that track is about to appear. Back in the Bad Old Days (CP/M in particular comes to mind) some computers required what were called hard-sectored floppy discs which had more than one index hole per disc. I have a Northstar Horizon I've been meaning to resurrect for curiosity sake that requires them - it wants 8 index holes per disc.

Oh, and that Northstar Horizon? Dual full-height 5.25" SS/SD (single sided, single density - 360k per disc!) floppy drives. Four CDROM drives worth of volume to access 720kb of data at a time.

The BIOS chip is 256 *bytes* - just enough to store code to read the actual BIOS and OS off the floppy. Which is why I can't easily resurrect the machine, I don't have that floppy, don't have hard sectored floppies and can't find a BIOS image for a 40 year old computer very easily.

It's got 64k of RAM on two S100 cards, though. Such a waste to not use it

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Sagebrush posted:

Ought to be enough.

ought to be enough for 1/10th of anybody, that's for sure.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Another AI poster just reminded me:

MCA and EISA expansion buses. Oh, and external L2/L3 cache modules.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Ensign Expendable posted:

My Digital Computers professor insisted that L3 cache wasn't faster than RAM enough to be practical, and no one would ever use it.

But but the itanium chips these days have up to 32MB of L3 cache per die... oh.

I actually worked on itanium for 3 years at intel. really cool tech, if they had released on time and sold at a price people could afford, it would have been amazing.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Parallel Paraplegic posted:

I thought the problem with Itanium is that while it was a really promising idea, nobody could figure out how to make a compiler that would be able to properly take advantage of the instruction parallelism and without that it had worse performance than everything else.

It is however my favorite example of diminishing expectations:



That's also true. I mostly hand-rolled my own code in assembly language as I was on the test/debug team, though we did also use C and C++. I didn't personally deal with the compiler team very much.

Itanium was one of those awesome ideas that got shot down by reality and people requesting things they didn't really need very much (see also: full backward compatibility with everything back into the bad old DOS days.)

Either way, it was an awesome platform to work with as a computer engineering/embedded systems/low-level software nerd and it changed how I view microprocessors in a fairly significant way.

I really wish I'd gotten a chance to work with PA-RISC, another very best of obsolete technologies, but it was fully obsolete by the time I was anywhere near done with school. 3-operand instructions

kastein has a new favorite as of 05:39 on Dec 15, 2012

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Zip disks... absolutely unbreakable, at least until you dare to put them in a Zip drive

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


You're doing something wrong, I've gone entire days () without charging my android and used it for GPS for hours without it dying or even coming close.

If you are fading in and out of cellular network range it will eat the battery like none other though, since the phone cranks the transmit power up all the way in an attempt to find another tower to talk to ASAP.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Datasmurf posted:



How about an network card with coax and AUI? I believe both of them are obsolete, and for all I know, failed. I can't remember ever using the AUI port for anything.

AUI is useful when you want to do something crazy like this.

http://ronja.twibright.com/metropolis/

10Mbit ethernet over homebuilt optical links.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I'm glad you did the sperging because I wanted to so, so badly.

Those tiny CRTs are actually liquid cooled, yeah. They have a reservoir of some sort of viscous (about like vegetable oil) clear fluid and a second glass pane right across the front and heatsinks mounted all the way around the edges. This is so the high intensity electron beam (which draws the picture on the colored phosphor screen so it can be projected via a series of lenses and mirrors onto the viewing screen) doesn't literally burn holes in the phosphor coating. Even so you have to be careful to turn the brightness down while calibrating them, else the calibration pattern will burn lines in it.

15 year old me had way too much fun pulling one of those TVs apart. No one will miss those things, bulky, dim, and horrible as they were. The lenses in them are awesome for burning ants and setting things on fire in the driveway, by the way.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I had to learn touch typing in middle school and hated it. I saw no point and almost immediately forgot all about it.

Then I got on IRC in high school and a month later was typing at 100+ wpm

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Computer engineers of yesteryear, UNITE!


(click for big so you can read the part numbers off the chips!)

I just found this in one of my moving boxes. The funny thing is, I do this stuff as a hobby too, in fact I have an 8088 system I built on 5 breadboards in college sitting here that I need to finish debugging, so it might actually be useful shortly!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Basically, the bottom of that little PCB on the end of the cable has a set of pins that plug into the motherboard where the 40 pin 8088 or 8086 chip normally would. The 40 pin socket on the top is where you plug the actual CPU in. The whole external board is a sort of interposer / "man in the middle" circuit that monitors what is going in between the CPU and the motherboard, sending any important signals back to the main box. The main box can tell it to halt execution, view register contents, change register contents, view memory data, etc for debugging purposes.

This sort of thing was entirely supplanted by JTAG-based debug systems sometime over the last 30 years or so - on modern CPUs, at least since around the Pentium era, probably earlier, there has been a special debug interface consisting of anywhere from half a dozen to a dozen or more pins on the processor that connects directly to a whole specialized test/debug infrastructure built into the processor itself. This makes the processor slightly more complicated, but significantly improves debuggability, which is generally worth the costs.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I did downgrade because I got so tired of my android devices crashing, having buggy UIs, and generally angering me. $25 flip phone off amazon. Hasn't crashed once since February, only ran out of battery once, I recharge it once a week (if that) and it seems to be bulletproof.

If it weren't for the stupid thing running otu of storage space for texts and popping up an ultra annoying warning dialog that you have to watch until it times out whenever the battery is low or it runs out of SMS storage, it'd never piss me off.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Please go look up the term "chamber pot".

People used to actually use the safety argument to justify shoving razors into holes in the wall instead of throwing them out. Just as they used to go to the bathroom in a chamber pot and then quite literally whip the contents out the window into the street.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Coffee And Pie posted:

The image of someone throwing toilet water out of the window screaming "GARDY LOO " will never not be funny to me.

No water involved

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Don't care, I still want one and don't buy a phone unless it has one.

Smartphone? You can pry my QWERTY (or dvorak, for real neckbeards) from my cold dead hands

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Holy poo poo, I remember those. Remember the first few Pentium 60/66 machines that had old 30 pin SIMM slots? I was a kid and scrounging for old parts by the time I was putting those together, so finding 4 identical SIMMs for each matched-quad set really sucked.

I might be remembering 486 machines with those, actually. Not sure.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Oh man, my XT clone I got like a decade ago to screw around with (yup...) has exactly that hard drive, and makes exactly that noise.

Fun fact: old hard drives like that used an actual stepper motor with a specially cut very thin stainless steel ribbon wrapped around its shaft to move the read/write head across the platters. The noise you are hearing is the stepper motor running. Modern hard drives use what's called a "voice coil" actuator, which is basically a pair of very strong magnets with an electromagnet coil suspended between them connected to the pivoting arm instead. The voltage across the coil (actually the current through it, but I digress) changing results in the angle of the arm changing.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I did xbox modchips in college too... knowing how to solder well was a good skill to have.

The DC++ network at my school was constantly being shut down because the netops group was a bunch of nazis. That being said, every oncampus system, student or otherwise, that wasn't part of critical infrastructure had a public static IP, so there was somewhat of a reasonable explanation for why it needed to be shut down.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I think they're called microSD cards.

I have lost more of those drat things than I care to think about.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


As of approx. 2009 there is still one in south station (I think? I can't really remember) in Boston.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Holy poo poo

How did they get it all SO WRONG so many times? At some point they should have imported some engines from China or something, I mean, at least they'd probably work right for a while before violently exploding and killing people.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Phanatic posted:

The ATF are complete killjoys.

Pretty much this, iirc they have even charged people with crimes who had defective guns that bump-fired on them unexpectedly.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Crankit posted:

I'm think he meant to say slam fire. The only case I'm aware with someone being prosecuted for having a gun that slam fired was a guy who lent it to people so they could enjoy the AK slam firing like a full auto weapon.

Pretty sure you are correct. I know my rear end from my elbow (but not my elbow from my knee, I guess) when it comes to firearms terms.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Exit Strategy posted:

My father knew Smokey. His "prowess" wasn't just aerodynamics and invention - The man was a legendary loving cheat. He was the real-world god damned Snidely Whiplash. Half the regulations in place for NASCAR today (cars must fit a defined pattern that is verified by NASCAR with dimensional tooling, fuel lines must be straight, fuel tanks must be unmodified and a regulation size) are thanks to Smokey Yunick pulling tricks like "shrink every dimension of a car by 10%", "pigtail coil the fuel line so that it holds enough fuel for half a lap", "inflate a basketball inside the fuel tank so that it holds regulation quantity of fuel when tested, leave the valve outside the tank, deflate the ball and fill remaining capacity."

Edit: None of this is intended to disparage Smokey at all. It's a testament to his ingenuity, resourcefulness, and tremendous balls that he's The Guy They Wrote The Book Around.

Goddamn. That level of cheating (without breaking the rules) takes true ingenuity.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Hey, if you're gonna have one set of parts made, you might as well have a couple and daily drive one to work the kinks out. Setup time/dies/molds are a massive part of production cost when doing low-quantity runs

(this is why I generally order 5 of any printed circuit board I design, the last one I did was $72 if I ordered one, $75 if I ordered 5... and parts to solder down ended up being $11.07 per board)

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Because it means packing more electronics into a phone just so no one has to plug them in. A 20 cent connector is cheaper, faster, easier, more efficient, and smaller. They do get full of dirt eventually, but that just means you need to buy a new phone, it's not exactly a downside to the manufacturer.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Groda posted:

Those were Thinking Machines.

EDIT: Okay, well, they were Crays in the novel, it looks like.

Thinking Machines as a whole is a perfect fit for this thread. It's like the british rail story, but reborn in the computer industry with the US federal government during the cold war as its sugar daddy.

http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Thinking-Machines.aspx

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


^^ every year since what, 1993? has been the Year of the Linux Desktop.

I'm not saying linux on the desktop is bad, just that it's not mainstream. Hell, I was happy running FreeBSD on my desktop for years, and will probably go back to that soon.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Yeah, uh, I do engineering work (specifically, embedded systems design and PCB design) and gently caress laptops. Multi monitor operation on laptops is retarded, while it's incredibly easy to add more video outputs on a desktop. I need as many screens and as much screen real estate pixel wise as I can get here. I have 3 right now, had 4 until one burnt out (I've been too lazy to recap it) and I can think of uses for another 4-5 pretty easily. I don't really need 3D acceleration very much but screen real estate is always useful.

Stockbrokers and financial types are big on having a million monitors too. They aren't getting on the laptop train anytime soon either.

Sure, for your average home user who just wants to check their gmail, play some facebook games, and surf the web, maybe watch youtube a bunch and play games without cranking the video detail settings all the way up, a laptop might be fine. For anyone who actually wants to get something done, probably not.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Brother Jonathan posted:

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned these yet: the VT100 terminal:



It was released in 1978 and was so successful that computers still have VT100 terminal emulation programs on them. I fondly remember banks of them at the university library for accessing the book database.

Hardware terminals aren't used anymore, though. Computing power is so cheap that it's wasteful to dedicate a machine to just providing a text terminal.

I still have two VT220s, a 320, a couple 420s, and a 520 or two. They make really good IRC terminals to leave around the house

I found an awesome telecommunications network data analyzer in my storage unit when I went to clean it out a bit last week. If I can just remember to bring my camera data cable to work I'll post some pics.

e:

Lallander posted:

While the VT100 was amazing let us not forget its space aged precursor the VT05.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ND6oLXocR0
The one in the background (the blue one) is a Lear Seigler ADM-3 or ADM-3A, my dad used one in college and I have it sitting here waiting to be repaired right now. Needs a couple switches cleaned out and I'm reasonably certain one of the memory chips is dead so I'll need to track one down and solder it in.

MadScientistWorking posted:

No d-sub 9 connectors were serial ports. Parallel ports were huge in comparison.

Honestly Boston is no more antiquated than a lot of cities or areas that are old in general. Its just that Boston is more noticeable because its a massive city.
There is a 25-pin D-subminiature connector RS232 port standard as well, it was the original until IBM realized no one gave a gently caress about most of those signals and reduced it to 9 pins. Technically speaking, it's a DE9 and a DB25 but no one calls them that anymore.

kastein has a new favorite as of 22:14 on Aug 14, 2013

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


strangemusic posted:

This is a laaaate quote, but god dammit my car was made in 2006, which in case you can't remember because it was apparently eons ago was well into the digital music age. It came with no aux in, and I still have to use one of these every day. It's infuriating, sounds awful,I feel like a silly techno-Grandpa, and I can't replace the dash audio unit with a new one (without going to the dealer and paying a mint) because it's integrated into the console.



Do yourself a favor and get one of the inline ones that hardwires to the receiver and feeds microvolt-level RF into the antenna input instead of the one you leave rattling around on your dashboard. They're much better.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Smiling Jack posted:

I forget if it was in Things I Won't Work With or Ignition! but someone developed a compound so sensitive it exploded if you shone a bright light on it.

He noted that it's great for blowing up Raman spectrometers but that's about it.

Also, it blew up if you shone fairly dim (a few milliwatts) infrared laser light on it. Which is about the gentlest thing you can do to something photographically, really.

http://pipeline.corante.com/archive...ore_or_less.php

quote:

The compound exploded in solution, it exploded on any attempts to touch or move the solid, and (most interestingly) it exploded when they were trying to get an infrared spectrum of it. The papers mention several detonations inside the Raman spectrometer as soon as the laser source was turned on, which must have helped the time pass more quickly. This shows a really commendable level of persistence, when you think about it - I don't know about you, but one exploding spectrometer is generally enough to make recognize a motion to adjourn for the day. But these folks are a different breed. They ended up having to use a much weaker light source, and consequently got a rather ugly Raman spectrum even after a lot of scanning, but if you think you can get better data, then step right up.

e: beaten by GWBBQ, and in the wrong thread too. Shame on me!

I saw something I forgot I even owned today while cleaning out my storage unit. A voltage regulator vacuum tube.

A what, you say?

http://www.radiomuseum.org/tubes/tube_0a3.html

It's basically a tube full of gas chosen to have the right ionization voltage. For a reasonably wide range of currents, it will maintain roughly the same voltage across the two terminals. So you use this to bias another tube that actually regulates the voltage supplied to the loads in your circuit.

They were obsolete decades before zener diode regulation became obsolete, which was decades ago.

kastein has a new favorite as of 02:35 on Jan 12, 2014

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Mr. Squishy posted:

Smartphones have an inbuilt CB radio scanner?
VVV Everybody look at Mr. "Friends with Johnny Bigblogs" down there VVV

there are online scanner streaming audio sites now. Use one in your phone's browser

(and hope it has someone actually streaming the channel you want in your area)

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Pham Nuwen posted:

I have one of these:



feels pretty cyberpunk.

edit: oops image leeching

haha poo poo is that a lear siegler ADM-3? My dad used one in college, still has it, and I have one that came with a Northstar Horizon I got from a classmate's dad years ago.

The Northstar Horizon is another fun one, 8080 or z80 CPU, 64k of RAM (two S100 cards!), dual full height 5.25" floppy drives, a video card that reportedly cost something like 2-3k when bought, etc etc. The power supply is linear instead of switch mode and the whole computer weighs like 100lbs. Its boot ROM is 256... bytes. Not kilobytes, bytes.

Which is the only reason I haven't gotten it booting yet, it ran CP/M (which puts most of the BIOS functionality in a file on the boot disk, which shuffled of this mortal coil decades ago) and used hard-sectored floppy disk media

Oh it has a math coprocessor built entirely out of PROM chips (not EEPROM or EPROM, just PROM) and 7400 series TTL logic, too. You fed the data in by sending bytes to specific memory addresses and then telling it what operation you wanted, then waited hundreds of clock cycles for your result. Still faster than doing it on an 8 bit microprocessor with no native divide or multiply instruction.

One of these decades I'll get it working. It came with full schematics for the mainboard and all adapter boards, and I know 8080/z80 machine+assembly language, so this is actually possible... the wonders of being a turbo nerd in high school. Now, too, but I get paid to do that poo poo these days.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Interesting, I thought the A meant it left the factory assembled instead of requiring the owner to solder the whole thing together.

Mine has a couple banks of DIP switches under that little cover that set number of bits per byte, stop bit count, parity type, baud rate, etc. I've never seen one with that switch on it, maybe the owner used two specific baud rates more than the others and added a toggle switch for them.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Trick for keeping your punchcard deck in order in case it gets dumped out of the storage box: set them in the box, pack them together nicely and slide them all so one end is against the side of the box. Now use a straightedge to draw a line diagonally down the tops of all the cards.

If they get dumped, just put them all in the box with the marks at the top and sort them till it makes a diagonal line again.

There's your obsolete tip on how to handle obsolete technology. To keep your paper tape in order, don't store it in your hamster's cage.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Quicker than the concrete sets, hopefully

But yeah, they're hosed. That is going to be out of commission for quite a while. This is why you make sure the spot you're pouring concrete into doesn't have any leaks or pipes or conduits open running to other spots you'd rather NOT fill with concrete.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


kastein posted:

Quicker than the concrete sets, hopefully

But yeah, they're hosed. That is going to be out of commission for quite a while. This is why you make sure the spot you're pouring concrete into doesn't have any leaks or pipes or conduits open running to other spots you'd rather NOT fill with concrete.

^ that's how you accidentally flood a room with cement.

Also, the way you solve that kind of problem is a handle of whiskey. and then a new job.

Any chemical or mechanical method of removing the cement is going to destroy the wiring and relays as well. And you'll never get it out of the connectors and relays. The only way that is getting fixed is with a jackhammer and a very large order of relays, wire, and sockets... I sure hope they have schematics for it in its present state and someone around who knows how to actually design/debug relay logic systems.

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Ron Burgundy posted:

I think these plotters follow a very basic set of instructions from the computer ie:

GOTO X
PEN DOWN
GOTO Y
PEN UP
GOTO Z
PEN DOWN
etc..

So the random movement is probably a result of poor conversion from the original vector image to the plotter language. (user error)

It actually seemed pretty good to me, there were a lot of small details in the spokes of the wheels that took a long time.

If I had to guess, you send a regular old vector file of some sort (postscript, most likely) straight to the printer and it just does whatever you tell it to. So yeah, inefficient software is entirely to blame, but it's probably the program used to create the vectors.

Fun fact which is also obsolete tech: Windows WMF/EMF image files. Guess what? They're actually specialized executable files that are comprised entirely of calls to various GDI32.dll drawing functions. As a result, they have been used multiple times as a vector for viruses and trojans - who is going to guess that an image file with the right filename extension is going to be one of those? The most recent was in Windows XP in 2005. That's like 10-15 years after the file format was last used extensively.

Also, WMF/EMF files would likely be very easy to translate into postscript to send to a plotter, since all you have to do is decode the file and figure out which functions are being called, then send the same commands in postscript form.

e: my boss at a previous job (workstudy at a computer desk in college) told me about the time some CS student had too much fun with the printer about a decade previous. They sent it a postscript file and it sat there for hours churning away not actually printing anything. He was going to kill the printjob, but noticed it was using an absurd amount of memory and since it was late at night and no one else was waiting for it, he was curious enough to just let it continue.

Several hours later it finally printed something - one of the stereotypical "reflective mirror balls and cones in front of a picture" type images. The submitter had written a raytracer entirely in postscript.

kastein has a new favorite as of 00:30 on Jan 26, 2014

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