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Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013







You see, having the drives wheels run against a set of smaller wheels instead of directly contacting the rails creates a gearing effect which totally speeds up the locomotives, and if you could just invest in a few hundred of



then I could totally sell these efficient locomotives to the railroads and make us all rich! No, why on earth would you think this is a scam?


But the damndest thing is that two of these things were actually built.

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Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



two forty posted:

This is interesting, what was it called? Looks like something out of a married to the sea comic.

They were built by the Holman Locomotive Company. I've no idea if they had any fancy name associated with them, but I'd be surprised if they didn't.


In a less-scammy vein, railway engineers in the early 20th studied steam-powered ships and thought to themselves "Gosh, these steam turbines are pretty powerful and efficient in ships! I bet they would do wonders for a locomotive!" The results were failures across the board, but produced some pretty rad designs nonetheless.

The German steam turbine locomotives were just





Whereas the American steam turbine locomotives look like they belong in some caricature of the 1950s:





I think there's a couple steam turbine locomotives preserved in Sweden, but all the super rad designs have long-since been scrapped.

Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



Crap British planes reminds me of the Vickers Type 161:



This was built in 1931, with guns that pointed upwards so that the plane could attack enemy airplanes or airships from below. It was also a push-prop design, a biplane, had a really weird engine configuration and was 15 years behind the times in general.

Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



theironjef posted:

Next on the docket:


That's the BV 141, a German reconnaissance aircraft that was built and successfully flown, but lost out to the FW 189 for a production contract. It was decidedly stable and offered an incredibly wide field of visibility for the crew. It's not broken, that's the whole airplane. Earlier models had a full tailplane surface but they stripped it down to half to increase visibility a little more.
Blohm & Voss loved the poo poo out of asymmetric designs, most of which were designed by one Dr. Vogt. They also made some other kickin' rad designs which, sadly, never made it off the drawing board, such as the BV 170, a tri-engine plane with a planned bombload of 4400 lbs:



Another aircraft maker from the time I like was Henschel, who in 1941 drew up plans for this neat little push-prop plane, the Henschel P.75:



Now, at this point a few of you may be thinking that you've seen these designs outside of WWII before. You may very well have, if you ever played Crimson Skies:


Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



Tracula posted:

That keyboard is pretty drat nice and it's something rather steampunk in design without looking like utter poo poo or as though it'd give you tetanus if you held it wrong.
Using more typewriter-ish keys there looks like it'd make it a lot easier to clean up the keyboard and all the inevitable gunk and cruft that accumulates underneath.

Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



vxskud posted:

So Gizmodo posted a somewhat tongue in cheek article about Sony's new high capacity magnetic tape, cue half my friends list earnestly posting about how cassette tapes are coming back.



They're just trying to wind you up.

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Ofaloaf
Feb 15, 2013



Ensign Expendable posted:

I learned to drive a manual. My instructor didn't believe in things like "designated instruction routes" so when I managed to stall less than half the time on the closed track he was allowed to drive me around, we were out into Moscow traffic. Fun times!
And you still live? You must be a driving god.

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