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Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

torjus posted:

As far as I know replacements for the plastic surrounding the discs were manufactured so you could swap out the stock one and fit standard DVDs in the GameCube.

Also, the Gamecube discs were just minidvds, which you could easily buy and burn in a standard dvd burner.

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Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Pilsner posted:

It's such a weird thing about modern phones (smartphones): Terrible battery life, extremely fragile

For a second I thought you were kidding when I read your post, specifically the "fragile" bit. Do people really think this, or is it just you? I'm flabbergasted. I thought the general consensus about modern phones was that they are far more durable than they have ever been before? I mean,there was a time when I would have never even wanted to touch a new phone without putting some sort of protective cover on it first, but now the idea of a protective cover just seems silly. I've had my current phone for nearly two years now (a Galaxy Nexus) and I throw it daily into pockets full of keys and change, I've sent it flying onto asphalt, concrete, and tile, spilled drinks on it, I don't even know what else. By now an old fashioned plastic Nokia would have looked like it had been through two wars, but this drat thing still looks like brand new. This Gorilla Glass (or whatever variant on it this phone uses) is a wonderful thing.

Just for fun, here's a video of a guy driving a nail into a board with the screen of his smartphone. And it's a Nokia! A modern one, though.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Geoj posted:

I'm honestly surprised they lasted as long as they did, given that they were basically smaller CDs that stored data on the disc by a slightly different method.

I sometimes wonder if it was technological advancement and price reduction in solid state digital media players that did them in, or recordable CD media prices dropping below $1/disc in the late 90s.

I was a big supporter of the minidisc back when. I think it had a bit to do with a combination of the drop in price of recordable media, the increasing reliability of burners, and the increasing ability of car cd players to play burned cds, at least in the US. By the time solid state digital media players became cost effective you really didn't see minidisc hardware or media in stores anymore.

I've noticed that a few people in this thread seemed a little mystified as to the appeal of minidiscs at the time. The thing was, at that time car cd decks tended to skip like crazy at every little bump and couldn't play burned cds (not that it really mattered, seeing as how at the time blank cds cost upwards of $10 a pop and you had about a 33% chance of making a coaster when you burned one). A good tape deck was seen by many to be a superior option for in the car. You kind of have to think of Minidiscs as more of an upgrade to cassette tapes than as an alternative to CDs.

At the time, Minidiscs were amazing - they were way cheaper than cd-rs (about $2.50 each when purchased in a 10 pack, IIRC), you could record to them over and over again, you could delete just the tracks you didn't want and add new ones, the sound quality was vastly superior to cassette tapes, you could just toss them on your dash or in your glovebox and never have to worry about scratching them, they never really skipped, the deck would display title information for each track, the portable player was way smaller and got much better battery life than anything else at the time, man, the list goes on and on.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Geoj posted:

Solid state was probably a bad example.

By 2002 HDD-based players were well below the price point and factors of magnitude more convenient to load (legal) music onto - drop CD into computer, rip to digital format and transfer to player in under 10 minutes vs. 1:1 dub from original format to MD, not to mention being able to carry an entire library of music on a single device without having to change out media.

I agree completely, but you have to realize that was long after minidiscs and minidisc hardware had all but disappeared in the US. I believe my friends and I adopted the minidisc around 1995.

EDIT: Whoops, fall two pages behind and suddenly I'm some yahoo posting about minidiscs in the train thread.

Mr. Beefhead has a new favorite as of 21:35 on Jul 2, 2013

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Jerry Cotton posted:

Fabric softener is the obsolete technology because about of textiles say "do not use fabric softener" on the tag and every drat kid is hell of allergic so no-one uses it anyway. (I guess a lot of people do though, it's probably a regional thing?). What is that ball anyway?

You don't even use the dryer sheet kind in your neck of the woods?

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

KozmoNaut posted:

It also ensured that there was basically no piracy on the GC until some crazy-rear end scheme was developed, using a bug in Phantasy Star Online and the network adapter to stream games onto the GC. It never really worked though, as the game rips were incomplete and buggy, and the network link was 10mbit only, leading to severe lag and loading errors in the games. So effectively, piracy was way too impractical and involved on the GC.

Compare this to the PS2 or the Xbox where you could more or less force them into playing pirated games with nothing but a stern look.

I didn't personally get into the GameCube nor do I know all of the details of the piracy on it, but I know that everyone I ever knew who had a GC (maybe seven or eight different people) pirated the poo poo out of everything for it. They all had these special lids for them that allowed them to use full sized DVDs. I'll give you the Xbox thing, but from where I was standing GC piracy sure seemed a lot more popular and easy than PS2 piracy.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Krispy Kareem posted:

I remember looking at that phone and this one:



I actually bought that thing. What a horrid mistake that was. It was really small, which would have been nice except for the fact that the internal battery was miniscule, providing about four hours of real-world standby time and maybe 45 minutes of doing anything that involved the screen. They "made up" for this by shipping it with an ugly external battery/case that more than doubled the thickness of the phone:

The square touchpad thing on the side with the large screen was completely worthless; it was staggeringly obvious that the only reason they'd included it was to try to appear to be more like an Iphone, but they didn't bother to actually make use of it in the UI. You couldn't do anything with it that wouldn't have worked far better with a standard 4-way navigation button. I don't think I've every been quite so happy to dump a phone as I was when I finally got rid of that piece of poo poo.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

GWBBQ posted:

They never completely went away. It's a niche market, but they're a nice easy way to make small production runs of albums. One of my brother's friends runs a record label that does exclusively tape releases for metal bands.

Well that just makes no goddamn sense at all. There is no way that a run of cassette tapes is in any way easier or cheaper than a run of cds, and then you've also got to deal with the fact that you're offering a thing in a format that you'd be lucky if even a fifth of your potential customers have the means to play. I mean, I can see the kitsch factor, but it's a hell of a sacrifice to make for the sake of kitsch.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Waterslide Industry Lobbyist posted:

I worked at Blockbuster (that's going to be fun to explain to the grandkids) for several years during the VHS phase-out. I left the company in '05 and we'd still have people return movies because of the black bars.

Sham bam bamina! posted:

I'd mercifully forgotten that that was an actual mindset that people had. Thanks for the reminder, rear end in a top hat. t

I recently had a relative furious over the fact that 2.35:1 aspect ratio movies still have "black bars" on his expensive new LCD TV. I tried to explain to him why seeing the whole image was a good thing, but once I pointed out the "zoom" button on his remote he got so happy I just couldn't bear to harass him any more.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

dissss posted:

Serious question - how on earth did you get your license without knowing that?

In my drivers ed course in high school in the US they pretty much taught us the rules of the road and basic driving skills. Things like how the car actually worked weren't really touched on. I can specifically remember a kid asking what the "1" and "2" were for on an automatic transmission shifter and being told "that's for towing things, don't mess with it".

Also, just as an aside, we were never taught how to deal with any real traffic, highway driving, or the dreaded "parallel park" as depicted in the comedic teen movies of the 80s and 90s. This probably goes a long way toward explaining why the majority the people I went to school with, in a suburb about thirty minutes of Chicago, flat-out refuse to drive to the actual city of Chicago for any reason.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

WebDog posted:

The OUYA thread pretty much documents the sheer disaster that thing is. Even the bottom rung excuse of "It's for emulators" is a poor one as it's been shown to struggle properly emulating SNES games, let alone attempt any console with 3D graphics. Almost all developers have seen the light and dwindling sales have ditched the platform, with the saving grace that given it's Android it's trivial to just "port" it back over to Google Play.

Ouya's now attempting to re-brand as a service of sorts, kind of like an exclusive store, to get around the severe shortcomings. Plus the kicker is that backers still haven't received their unit.

I think it was PC World that summed it up with "as a reviewer we get tons of junk that is barely worth our time, Ouya just happens to come with some publicity but fails to live up to that"

The Ouya thread is pretty much the worst (best?) example of a goon circlejerk you'll ever see. The Ouya had, and has, a list of problems as long as my arm, but for a lot of people the purchase hasn't been the disaster that the ridiculous Ouya thread would have you believe. Of the twenty or so people who have made 95% of the posts in that thread, I'm fairly certain that few to none have actually used an Ouya themselves.

I can say first hand (I own an Ouya) that NES and SNES emulation is basically perfect on it and has been for a long time. This isn't anything you mentioned, but XBMC runs great on it as well.

I don't know where you get the idea that backers still haven't received their unit, but I certainly can't find anything that backs it up. I would venture to say that appears that all backers received their units no later than about ten months ago (mid-September 2013). It was still atrociously lovely for Ouya to take that long, seeing as how they managed to get units on retail shelves by July, but at least people did finally get them.

I personally know three people who purchased Ouyas through Kickstarter. They all got theirs and I got mine by July of last year. The three people all use them daily for XBMC, and occasionally for a bit of gaming. Of the four of us, I'm really the only one who was stupid to buy an Ouya, because I already had an HTPC for XBMC and a PS3 for emulators by the time the Ouya shipped, so these days my Ouya is just hanging out in a drawer.

Here's a recent article discussing one person's recent experience playing an Ouya with friends. I've played all the games he discusses, and I'd agree with the article pretty much completely.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Binary Badger posted:

When I saw their equipment my jaw hit the floor, the situation was straight out of a Community episode. They had found a bunch of unopened boxes in their basement and it turned out to be all never-used 20th century computer equipment. It was a bunch of Packard-Bell Apple ][s, with some Imagewriter printers, paper, and a handful of programs like Stickybear Bounce, PFS: File, AppleWriter //, Math Blaster, The Print Shop, Reader Rabbit, and a fistful of Sunburst programs like Incredible Machine, and of course the old standard Oregon Trail.

Unopened boxes, eh? I bet they could've sold those things to collectors and easily made enough money to buy modern equipment.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

Na'at posted:

Seriously spotify does everything pandora does and more. Why stick with such a poo poo service?

I don't use music streaming services very often, but when I do, it's specifically in the hopes of finding new music to listen to. Pandora lets me build a station based on some artists I like and away it goes. Spotify works in sort of the same way, but for some reason every time I've tried to use it it tries to play certain songs constantly, like as often as every fourth song. gently caress Spotify right in it's stupid rear end.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

HonorableTB posted:

I wouldn't mind satellite radio because for the vast majority of people, they have data caps that make Pandora/Spotify streaming (from their phones to the stereo via bluetooth) unfeasible unless they want to murder their entire data allotment for the month in a few hours.

For what it's worth, T-Mobile now offers unlimited use of pretty much all the major music services with even their cheapest plans. I guess time will tell, but I'd imagine that the other providers will be forced to follow suit in pretty short order to stay competitive.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

cheerfullydrab posted:

So many things could be delivered with pneumatic tubes! Whole fish, pairs of glasses, cell phone batteries, burritos, souvenir replicas of the Empire State Building, t shirts, toothpaste!

Could be?? Don't forget that the The Alameda-Weehawken Burrito Tunnel is essentially a pneumatic system.

Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

WebDog posted:

Back around Wolf 3D the mouse was treated as an alternate joystick, so you moved forwards, backwards and looked left and right - meaning many tedious actions of moving forwards, lifting the mouse back to the center of the pad, and rinse repeat.

That was still the default when you used the mouse for control on the first releases of Quake. I remember people saying that using the mouse was the way to go and thinking they were nuts.

Boy was I loving surprised the first time I sat down to a game that had the mouse controls set up right.

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Mr. Beefhead
May 8, 2003

I can make beans into peas.

JayKay posted:

I can't remember which Creative portable media player it was, but I had a photographer buddy in the early 2000's who was snatching them up just for the Microdrives. Apparently it was cheaper to buy the PMP and harvest the Microdrive than it was to buy a Microdrive on it's own.

There may have been more than one, but that was the case with the MuVo 2.



For a very short period of time, you could buy a MuVo2, pull the drive, and sell it on ebay for enough to cover the cost of the player as well as a 512MB CF card to replace the drive with. This was at a time when 512MB was a fairly respectable size for a shockproof, flash based mp3 player - especially for free. Goddamn that was a satisfying trick.

Mr. Beefhead has a new favorite as of 17:21 on May 13, 2015

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