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mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Sunshine89 posted:

From 2003 to 2006 some areas in Toronto had access to an innovative solution in search of a problem, Dexit



I can't help but be reminded of the current movement to popularise wireless payments via your smartphone.



You still need a phone that actually have the NFC chips installed, but I guess its better than having a tiny looking card that might get lost in your bag.

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mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

axolotl farmer posted:

VCDs were huge in Asia, mostly because the movie could be pressed by the same plants that made bootleg CDs.
Apart from that, I believe VCDs were also big in Asia because they handled the heat and humidity alot better than VHS tapes in countries like Singapore and India. I think this was also the reason why LDs had greater success in Asia as well.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

This is my first mobile phone which I got in 2000, the a1018, made by Ericsson before they became Sony Ericsson and before they dropped the Ericsson name all together. I got it as part of a prepaid package, which cost me a cool AUD$200 at the time.



Fun fact: when I got this early 2000, text messaging was unavailable for pre-paid plan customers on the network I was on. They only got around to making it available for everyone later that year.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Cleretic posted:

I read through this thread over a day, and I'm wondering, whatever happened to the trend of smartwatches?
They're coming back into the public consciousness with things like the Pebble getting huge publicity, though now they're paired with smartphones and pretty much act as secondary displays and inputs rather than be standalone devices.



A few years ago I had this thing acting as both my phone and my music player, since I thought it'd be a smart move to have one device that could do both. Sony spent quite a bit of effort trying to keep the Walkman brand alive by releasing a bunch of Walkman branded phones but in retrospect they didn't do that good a job of it. The music player was really slow to use at least on this model, the transfer software tended to do things like inadvertently speed up the audio or cut off the beginnings of songs (thank God you could use Windows explorer) and you could only use the propriety headphone plug that fit into the same port as the charger so you can't listen to music and recharge it at the same time.

It sure looked great though.

mrkillboy has a new favorite as of 12:55 on Jul 29, 2012

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Imagine yourself in 1993. What could be better than a PC you can play games on? How about a PC that plays Sega Mega Drive games as well?



I remember seeing this in a catalogue when I was about 12, and I really, really wanted one because I thought the whole concept was mind blowing. It's basically an Amstrad PC running MS-DOS with a Mega Drive (Genesis) stuffed inside; however they didn't share any hardware except for the monitor, and it was designed so that you couldn't use both at the same time. It did come with a white gamepad for the Sega games though.

It was released only in Europe and Australia, and set you back 999. Interestingly enough, this was actually preceded by another PC/Mega Drive hybrid called the TeraDrive which was only released in Japan. Unlike the Mega PC you could actually play Mega Drive games at the same time the main PC OS was being used.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Ensign_Ricky posted:

All this PDA talk going off and on for the past however many pages, and you all seem to have forgotten the granddaddy of them all...The Newton!



The drat thing could (supposedly) read handwriting and change it into basic text.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxZJsGuUfew

I watched this episode with a few friends who were way too young to have even heard of the Newton and the joke still makes sense today.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

razorrozar posted:

The problem is that not a single game is playable in any measure, for a variety of reasons, and the cartridge is not worth two cents, let alone twenty thousand cents.
As I recall, Active Enterprises, the company that developed the Action 52 actually ran a contest to promote the game by offering a cash prize of $104,000 if you were the first to complete one of the games on the cart. The problem was, aside from the fact that the contest was probably a huge scam, was that the chosen game was unbeatable; like the others it was a buggy piece of poo poo that crashed after the first level.

Oh yeah, the same company also announced this monstrosity at a CES:



They disappeared not long after.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

My family owned 2 Atari 2600s when I was growing up. The first was the original, classic model with fake wood paneling. The second was this, the Atari 2600 Jr.



In the late 80s they re-released the console in Australia (the Jr. actually originally came out around 1985) with 100 BUILT IN GAMES! I remember going to the shops with my folks intending to come home with a Sega Master System II and instead getting this instead because 100 BUILT IN GAMES! seemed far better value. As far as I can tell, it was a legit promotion by Atari too.

It included a good selection of Atari classics like Combat, Adventure and their Space Invaders and Missile Command ports. It did have Pac-Man but not ET. It was also missing games like Tempest and Yar's Revenge. Surprisingly there was also a large number of Activision games like River Raid and Pitfall. There was no instructions, let alone a game listing.

You would cycle through the games by pressing the select button. The console also came with this gamepad instead of the classic stiff-as-gently caress joystick.



So I played this when everyone else had NESs and Master Systems, and I only caught up when I got a SNES a few years later. Still, most of my fond memories playing Atari games came from the time I had this, though to this day I have no idea what the gently caress was going on in that Superman game:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7U2TFIayos

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Killer robot posted:

This wasn't even unique to bootleg multicarts. Back in the 2600 days even legit cartridges Atari themselves sold would say "20 games!" or whatever on the front, and count every single game variant or difficulty level as a separate game.games.

Yep. This is actually one of the launch games.



I hope you like Pong, because here's 50 variations of it!

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

WebDog posted:

Samsung SPH-N270


It was released as a limited edition collectable during Matrix Reloaded, sold for around $500, and despite a run of 10,000 appears to have sold roughly 2000.

That's a really loving ugly phone. It looks like something the marines in Aliens would carry.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

ZALGO! posted:

I remember my dad bought one of the first generation HD-DVD players and the thing was like a computer, when you turned it on it took like two or three minutes to boot up
I have a fairly recent Blu-Ray player and it still takes time to boot. Not anywhere near 3 minutes (more like 30 seconds) but I don't recall any of my DVD players taking more than 3 seconds to get ready to play.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

ExplodingSquidx2 posted:

How about the ID4 toys that came with a floppy so you could "hack" the alien's system!


I remember playing one of those! The one I played wasn't a hacking game, but rather you piloted an F-18 in third person against alien fighters. It was one of those stand alone Flash games and the frame rate ran in the single digits.

By the way, what ever happened to those crappy Flash-based games and screensavers movie websites let people download? I remember them being really popular in the late 90s and then they just disappeared. I guess mobile apps have replaced them somewhat.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

WendigoJohnson posted:

Here's an entire TV series made in the 1980's about life after the year 2000, it was called "Beyond 2000".

There was a follow up series made a few years ago called Beyond Tomorrow. I caught a repeat recently and I was amused when they aired a segment about the latest and greatest mobile phones and proceeded to show off that Motorola phone that could sync up with iTunes.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Here's something I was thinking about last night: webrings. What happened to them?

I remember seeing those navigation links at the bottom of almost every amateur website for years, and then, like Keyser Soze, they just disappeared. I guess the die off of sites like Geocities and the rise of social media kind of took away their purpose.

mrkillboy has a new favorite as of 07:38 on Aug 11, 2013

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Did anyone have a Scandiphone? The brief rotary phone chat reminded me of it.



I had one growing up in the 80s before we replaced it with contemporary digital desk phone. It had a rotary dial at the bottom along with a big red button you pressed to hang up. You lifted up the entire thing to answer it.



Out of the blue earlier this year my mother asked me to get one for her off eBay. It turns out they still make it; same old design but with new modern features like a choice of ring tones. And as you can see in the pic below, push buttons instead of the rotary dial.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Humphreys posted:

SIM cards sure have changed a lot:



Considering how little of the card is actual circuit it makes me wonder why they didn't start off mini or micro sized in the first place.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Christmas Present posted:

this guy:

was my main music device for nearly a decade, until I lost it somewhere and replaced its functionality with my Android tablet

still miss it, it was so very tiny



I used this for a few years. The larger half held a single AAA battery while you just plugged the player part into a computer and it showed up as a flash drive.

I wish I could find a picture of the first mp3 player I had, a one-off CD/mp3 player also by Creative I brought while on holiday in Singapore in 2001, and I'm convinced it has never been sold anywhere else. It was purple and white, had piss poor battery life and tiny unresponsive buttons, and after playing 40 mp3s it would lock up and you'd need to pull out the batteries in order to reset the thing. The battery compartment was also under the lid and you'd often have to remove the still spinning disc just to access it. It sucked.

edit: This is the only image I could find of it:



It was literally called something like the Creative MP3CD-001.

mrkillboy has a new favorite as of 13:13 on May 6, 2014

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

WebDog posted:

I think I had the same thing (posted earlier). Curiously the Internet seems to have forgotten this, as I found it with little issue last time.

Creative DAP-CD0001.

Yeah thats it, it even came with the wired remote in the picture.

I don't know if mine was a dud unit but it was just woeful to use. Along with the lock up issue I mentioned previously, I remember it just being really slow to do anything. Waiting for it to seek tracks in shuffle mode felt almost excruciating. I do vaguely remember it being relatively cheap when I brought it though (sub-SGD$200).

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

WebDog posted:

With Japan it's illegal to rent out games.

Back in the early-1990s I used to read a lot of imported British console magazines like Super Play and CVG (I live in Australia) and one thing that really really stuck out for me in the letters sections was that they'd always harp about how you couldn't rent out games in the UK and that it was illegal or forbidden or something. Also Nintendo apparently had something to do with it as well?

Anyone who remembers care to shed some light on this? A quick Google search seems to indicate that renting games in Britain is all kosher now but I'm just curious about the different situation back then, since adolescent me going to the video store and renting out Street Fighter II for the umpteenth time was a pretty regular thing I did back in the day.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

madpanda posted:

This probably got posted before but whatever

The Sega Ir-7000 Communicator. This thing had basic pda functions and this battle mode which was like a very simple pokemon type game that I think had leveling, and if you had 2 of these devices you could play over IR which was very wicked.


A guy I knew in high school brought this thing to school a couple of times and showed off the game to our group of friends. I seem to recall that we were all pretty impressed by it but he would never let us actually play it for ourselves.

Oh man, I must have spent a good fifteen or so years trying to find out what the hell this thing actually was; I didn't realize Sega put it out and there was also a bunch of other similarly colored basic PDAs for teens out at the time so apart from the game it didn't exactly stand out. So thanks thread, I guess.

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Cat Hatter posted:

(Oh, and airlines usually want a movie list that doesn't have tits in it so they don't have parents complaining about the guy next to their toddler watching Orange Is The New Black or Spartacus.)

Maybe this is a mostly American thing because I distinctly remember watching The Devil's Advocate on a Singapore Airlines flight to Australia in 1997 and it was completely uncut as far as I know (it was through the in-seat system though).

Tangentially related to the thread, but I was in Singapore about a month ago and I found it kind of weird that digital TV is not really A Thing in that country. Sure, they're currently making the switchover now (albeit very slowly) but it was kind of odd seeing so many HDTVs tuned in to analog broadcasts at the places I was staying.

mrkillboy has a new favorite as of 12:28 on Nov 9, 2014

mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Clockwork Sputnik posted:

Back in the day I was in a fairly well known industrial band, and some dumbshit at our label leaked our next CD about a month before it was to be released.

From several pages ago but this just reminded me again of a quite interesting article I had read about a record plant worker who ended up leaking hundreds of albums onto the net: The Man Who Broke The Music Business.

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mrkillboy
May 13, 2003

"Something witty."

Humphreys posted:

The Asylum should really start making cheesy TV shows as well as their cheesy movies. They make crap - but crap that sells and always makes a profit.

Good news!

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