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Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

Terrible Robot posted:

I got more of a Phantom vibe from it.

A more direct descendant would be The Sega Channel

It was a similar concept for the Sega Genesis, but it was a device that you rented from your cable provider for a monthly fee. It plugged in to your Genesis's cartage slot and your cable, can every thirty days the selection of games changed. 50 different games every month, with unlimited play time for $15-25. It truly was incredible...

http://www.okaygeek.com/blog/rememb...ga-channel.html

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Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry



This was my first hand held video game. 2 player Galaxian. It's so 80's it hurts.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

ZanderZ posted:

Why the hell don't they just make a touchscreen gaming tablet? I play mobile FIFA more than I play PS3 FIFA and the only downside to a touch screen, analog stick (vs a physical analog controller) is when my hands get too sweaty.

Sony really missed the boat with the Vita. Especially when you consider that they are already making Android phones, some of which were already geared towards playing games. They should have made a line of Playstation/PSP phones that had standardized specs, ran Android, etc. And then also sold a wifi only model to take the place of the PSP.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

The Vadem Clio



I had one of these back when I was in college in 1998. It was a fairly unusual device for the time and was ahead of it's time in lot of ways.

It had a unique design that allowed you to use it as a laptop or a tablet. I used it quite a bit to type notes in class and draw sketches on the notes. It ran Windows CE 3.0 and was all flash and ram. This allowed for it to start up very quickly (because it was never really off, just asleep). It also meant that you would loose data if you ever let the battery completely drain.

But no worries, you could just sync it to your PC when you got home using the proprietary mini dock cable that connected to your serial port and used a very old version of Microsoft Active Sync.

Battery life was a lot better than your averager laptop. Partly because the thing had either an 84Mhz or 168Mhz MIPS CPU.

No wireless connectivity of any kind since it predates WiFi and bluetooth standards. But it did have a 56K modem built in, so you could enjoin the internet of the late 90's on Pocket Internet Explorer 3.0, which is about as much fun as it sounds.

Sharp sold a rebadged version of it called the Tri-Pad that I think was a little more popular.

I still have mine in my attic. Honestly, I would kind of like to see an updated version of this. Same form factor and everything, just with a modern OS and modern internals.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

Poknok posted:

My grandad collects old newspapers and books, and in his giant stash of paper I found a collection of ostensibly "scientific" magazines from 1950s which were in reality just pictures of cartoonish robots and someone's idea how space travel will one day look alike. Ridiculous and amazing at the same time.
Anyways, the writers of the magazine correctly understood the huge potential nuclear power holds and they were fascinated about it; the only thing they didn't catch is how loving dangerous it was. Among the things listed there were:

Wristwatch powered by plutonium RTG
Radioactive golf balls. The idea was that you'd find your ball using a directional geiger counter
Uranium-powered oven. Hey man, the bread sure gets warm when radioactive!

And so much more stillborn technology. Too bad my grandad lives six hours away, people in 1950s used to get worked up about stuff that we either take for granted today or the stuff that never came to pass for one reason or another.

I love the art of 50's sci-fi. The pointy rockets, the antennas, the glass domes.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

Ensign_Ricky posted:

All this PDA talk going off and on for the past however many pages, and you all seem to have forgotten the granddaddy of them all...The Newton!


The drat thing could (supposedly) read handwriting and change it into basic text. Unfortunately, the dictionary of words that came pre-installed was a total joke. Still, I remember seeing one of my teachers with one of these and became convinced he was the coolest human being I had ever seen.

If I ever trade my Android for an iPhone, I'm gonna get a case mod just like this one.

So Eighties, you can practically smell the pure cocaine.

psssff..

I laugh at your Newton.



Sell hello the Psion Series III. There was a Series II that I guess you could still call a PDA, but it looked more like a calculator.

I had a Series III when I was in 6th grade. And believe it or not, girls would line up to give me their phone number to put in this thing. Ironically, my obsession with gadgets like this is exactly why none of them would take my phone calls

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

Not Your Senorita posted:



I think the Atari Lynx was the first handheld gaming system that was able to be played horizontally or vertically. In 1989 (same year the original Game Boy was released) it was also the first one with a backlit color LCD screen. Unfortunately the games for it weren't as popular as what was on the Game Boy (and later the Game Gear), and the battery life was pretty crap. Compared to the Game Gear's lovely color screen, though, this thing was fantastic. Still just as awkward and annoying to hold for more than 15 minutes, but nothing else came close to touching the colors and graphics at the time.

The hardware on it is pretty amazing considering the time it was released (in addition to the great screen and horizontal/vertical switching, you could network with up to 17 players for multiplayer games), but with Nintendo and Sega dominating the market with better titles, cheaper systems, and easier buying accessibility, it's no surprise this thing didn't make it.

My dad got my brother and I the updated model which is a little neater looking than the one in the ad. Paperboy was my by far my favorite out of the games we had for it. My dad probably still has it somewhere - a lot of the old Atari stuff he has would probably be great for this thread if I can dig it up.

It is also worth noting that the Atari Lynx was a fairly large device for a hand held system, even for the time. Supposedly Atari/Epyx listened to some focus groups during the development of the system and the feed back was that $179 was too much money to spend on something so small. So they increased the size of the casing of the device to make it look and feel bigger.

Also, the Lynx was originally developed to load games from some kind of cassette tape. Later in development, the changed to ROM cartridges, buy system was still designed to load the entire game image in to RAM before playing. The limited the amount of system RAM was was available to games. It also meant that it was a cartridge based system that had load times.

Lowen SoDium has a new favorite as of 14:33 on Sep 7, 2012

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

movax posted:

I'm really excited that other people had MiniDiscs too! I thought I would be a rebel and get a MD player instead of a CD player.

Ended up with a MZ-R909 and had a great time dubbing my own MDs. I waited in vain for a MD burner/recorder to show up

I think there was one VAIO desktop model with a MD drive.

I had the MZ R5ST. I bought it in Japan when I was visiting back in 1998. The whole docking station thing was pretty cool.

As far as a MD burner goes, Sony really dropped the ball on MD PC drives. They did have MD data drives but the disc were not compatible with the audio players. They were trying to compete with iOmega's ZIP disc but got to the market late and over priced. They were also slow as poo poo.

Later they had netMD players which let you copy music to your MD via USB at 32x speed. But you had to use their lovely SonicStage software.

They came out with the Hi-MD disc drive in 2004, and it could write audio and data to the same disc. But they were discontinued in 2011.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

KozmoNaut posted:

Was it the Pantech C810?

I seem to remember there being a handful of phones that did as you described. Nokia also made a couple of phones (including the N95) that slid one way for numbers and the other for media controls.

Going to mention Nokia sliders and not mention the Nokia 8110?



In The Matrix, the phones were modified to have a spring loaded slider. Nokia's follow up model, the 7110, came with a spring loaded slider stock.

I remember the cell phone shacks in the malls selling slider covers for the ever popular Nokia 5100 series phones that EVERYONE had back in 2000.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Ensign Expendable posted:

Flash drives will never be obsolete, you can't boot from Dropbox.

Not that it will obsolete flash drives, but you can boot form network on most systems.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Totally Reasonable posted:


TS44, TS44 Deluxe, TS22-209, and a rather early GPS
They still work (mostly), but it's only a matter of time.

Those Butt Sets are not really obsolete. Probably won't be completely useless for another 50 years at least, given the unreasonable dependency people have on Fax machines and other analog line technologies.

I work in IP telephony, and I still have to use an analog butt set on nearly ever install I do, for one reason or another.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

treiz01 posted:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHlRmKAPFt0
This crazy poo poo. I played one of these for years. It had a plethora of synth crap but I usually left it on plain piano. I bought it from another kid at school for $50 and it came with a Sega Genesis AC adapter! This was the best part of the whole keyboard though, I drove my mother crazy mashing the demo button over and over again.

Us cool kids had the Casio SK-5 sampling keyboard, complete with real Pulse Code Modulation technology.

Lets face it, the first thing everyone does is record a sample of a fart sound and then play one of the demo songs using nothing but farts.

Lowen SoDium has a new favorite as of 15:27 on Dec 12, 2012

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Phanatic posted:

If by "perfected" you mean "they modulated a beep to make it sound like something other than a beep," yeah. Even at its cleverest (Like in "Space Hulk,") it still sounded a lot like modem handshaking:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:S...lk_briefing.ogg

"Star Control 2" also did this. It worked, but it sounded pretty tinny and hollow.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Inspector_71 posted:

I dunno, I think this is pretty true now. I mean, WebTV died but look at the features on set-top boxes now. Sure, I can't browse the forums on my TV, but why would I?

Smart TVs are becoming more and more the standard, many of them even having decent HTML 5 web browsers.

Consider that most HDTV's already have some sort of embedded CPU and firmware for image processing, TV manufacturer are more and more likely to include Apps as a "me too" feature since it most of the hardware needed to do it is already there.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

WebDog posted:

I did this the other night, where fresh off the charger, I'd forgotten to quit navigation and it'd devoured my battery to 40% within an hour and gave me a toasty leg.
The only real way to keep any smartphone alive through the day is to turn off or limit 3G networks as I understand when in an area of low reception some phones will boost power trying to cling into a 3G signal.

It's one thing I do miss, the days of week long gaps between charges thanks to the phone having very little for the battery to chew thorough..

If you turn off data and leave the screen off, you will probably get several days of standby on most smart phones. Even with data on, if I don't use mine and I am on a good WiFi signal, I can get 2 or 3 days of standby out of it.

Basically, it will last if you don't use it.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

minato posted:

As I recall, people thought that SCSI drives were more reliable than regular IDE drives, which made little sense to me because surely the reliability would be due to the disc/controller build quality, not the external data transfer mechanism. But either way, SCSI discs cost around 4x the price of IDE discs and were a pain in the rear end to set up. They worked pretty well once you got them going though.

I think you could daisy-chain up to 8 of them on a single SCSI chain (with the controller itself being number 0), but most drives had to have their SCSI number set with jumpers, it wasn't plug-and-play. And for some reason, the only CD-ROM drives that were capable of ripping Red Book Audio (the raw 16-bit waveforms) were SCSI. I don't know why IDE drives couldn't do that, it's not like it they couldn't play CDs or anything. (Another obsolete tech - Play/FF/volume CD audio controls directly on the front of CD-ROM drives)

SCSI connectors could be gigantic, relatively speaking:

And each daisy chain had to be terminated with one of these blocks:


Apple Macintoshes were big on SCSI, as were PC CD-ROM-burning products (because only SCSI could keep up with the data rates required to burn CDs or something).

SCSI was more expensive and more difficult to set up than IDE was on consumer systems, but it was faster. SCSI 1 was capable of 40Mbps, where as ATA/IDE drives on an ATA-1 controller maxed out at 8.3Mbps. ATA/IE didn't get interface speeds close to SCSI until ATA-4 was capable of Ultra DMA 33 Mbps. By then, SCSI was already up to 160Mbps.

Single drives at that time were barely capable of that kind of through put. SCSI's higher through put was more important because, as you had mentioned, it was able to have 8 devices on a bus where as ATA only supported 2. SCSI was also used for RAID at the time, which was not available on the slower ATA interfaces of the time.

SCSI's other big advantage was that it had a standardized external connection for external drives and other devices like scanners. ATA never had an external connector standard until the External SATA standard.

The reason that SCSI drives had a higher reliability than IDE drives was because SCSI drives were usually enterprise class drives used in production servers and were usually sold with a higher MTBF rating and warranties, where as IDE drivers were considered consumer drives.

IDE CD-ROM drives were able to rip red book audio digitally. But it was more common in the early days of lower speed ATA interfaces, the CD-ROM drives them selves would decode and play the audio CD and output to the computer's sound card via an analog cable. Many SCSI drives could also play CD's this way.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

WebDog posted:

I once had a dedicated SCSI A3 scanner and A1 printer on some ancient IBM tower thing that I had scored from an architectural firm. I think even the CD burner was also fed into the SCSI card.
The problem was the SCSI card was ISA so I was unable to rat it and use it in another system so the payoff was a painfully slow system that I was unable to buy anything to upgrade it with.

I remember the scanner being a sheer nightmare to install where upon going to their website they only offered the drivers on CD for $20. Yet if you typed in their European address you were able to download it for free off their FTP.

Do obsolete 90's computer jokes count?


That reminds me. Does anyone else remember old CRT page monitors? The were monitors that were a very tall aspect ratio meant to be able to display a whole page in a word processor at one time. I can't find any information on what the actual aspect ratio of these monitors were, but it seems like there were pretty close to what a common wide screen monitor is today, but turn vertical. I had seem some that had a rotatable base and special video card that would automatically change the picture to match the screens orientation. It seems that this is a technology that the internet has completely forgot... or rather might have never known about since they died out before the internet came in to wide use.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry


Nice post.

I was trying to find a specific Databack watch that Casio made back in the mid to late 90's that had a round analog face, but opened up like a clam shell to reveal keyboard on the bottom and a digital screen on the top, but I can't find it.

But I did find a nice collection of nerd watch porn.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

OozieNelson posted:

I was wondering if anybody remembers the white plastic slate/art board type thing that you hooked up to your TV and you drew on the slate with certain tools and it showed up on your TV. It was kind if like plugging in MS Paint and being able to draw and color an see it on your TV.

That would be the Video Painter:



My sister and I had one of these growing up. We played the poo poo out of it.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Arrath posted:

Oh wow, my parent's had this exact TV in their bedroom when I was younger. They mostly used it as a radio, but sometimes I'd watch Saturday morning cartoons in all its black and white glory.

We used to have one in our old conversion Van.

When I was a kid, I used to think that having a TV in car/van was the coolest thing ever. Until I put an NES in there. Then I thought that that was the coolest thing ever.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

oldskool posted:

Don't forget to have the TURBO button installed that didn't seem to do anything but turn on the 1 at the front of the display, thereby showing an absurd 166MHz speed


Ensign Expendable posted:

I was sad when I found out that those things didn't actually measure frequency, and were just pre-set 7-segment displays.


For a very brief moment in PC history, some computer case speed displays and turbo buttons actually did do something. I built a few 486 systems that the turbo button effectively turned on and off the 2x multiplier for the BUS speed and switched the system from 33Mhz to 66Mhz or from 25Mhz to 50Mhz. And the LCD display would actually show the selected speed.

The turbo button really should have been labeled "Slow Down" because it idea was not to turn it on to make your system go faster, but to turn it off to make your system run slower. Some programs back then did not use any kind of rate or clock limiting and would run as fast as they possibly could. Imagine trying to play a game that ran at full speed on a 25Mhz CPU on a computer that ran at twice that speed.

Most systems that had the LED displays I saw or built by the time Pentiums were running around 133Mhz, where pre-set with jumpers and often didn't do anything with the Turbo Button.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

atomicthumbs posted:

you mean like StrongARM and XScale?

He meant the SoC Atoms chips that are targeting Cell Phones, but you are right. Intel has made ARM chips before.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Taeke posted:

I was just thinking of coming back to this thread to edit my post and add that I'm by no means an expert and I was probably projecting, so you could all disregard my post, so you're absolutely right, although I've never heard of anyone using a docking station and frankly, I don't see the benefit of one.


Also, this is a very good point.

As for people who need multiple monitors for their work, those are the specialised users I was referring to that would need a proper desktop.

Docking stations are very common in a lot of corporate office environments. My company issues docks to everyone who has a laptop.

I will also say that my new Dell Latitude 6430 with Nvidia/Intel hybrid graphics and it runs 2 external monitors and the display on the laptop simultaneously and it works great. It is the first laptop I have ever had that could do that.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

techknight posted:

The quality is poo poo, but the main thing was being able to take and re-take as many photos as I liked without incurring any film/developing costs. It was a really freeing feeling back then!

I also got a first-gen Casio Wristcam in late 2000:



It took photos at only 120x120 resolution (and not even in colour), but it was fun for little portraits and animated gifs.


I almost got one of these for Christmas one year but my dad was (is) pretty computer illiterate. When he ordered it, the ship to address field was defaulted to Antigua for the country. So the sell supposedly shipped it to Kentucky Antiqua.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

You can't post that thing with out posting it's controller

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Croccers posted:

There's an N-Gage in that picture. I think that's a good failed technology thing.
Have to hold it on the side to talk.

You had to remove the battery to change the game in it.


Side Talkin'

Games on SD car that was inserted under the battery, requiring you to take the device apart to change the game (fixed in the second version)

Screen in the portrait orientation

The 2 controller buttons were just part of the dial pad


The idea for a cell phone that was also a handheld gaming system was a a really good one for the time, though it was obsoleted by smartphones. It is pretty obivous that Nokia had no loving clue what they were doing. It would have been a successful idea if Nintendo had put out a GBA or DS cell phone. I was actually expecting Sony-Ericsson to put out a PSP smart phone.

Sony finally came out with an Android based Xperia phone that had a slide out controller that was decent, but it felt like a miss opportunity since the PSP Vita came out not long afterwards and wasn't compatible. Sony could have made the PSP Vita be android based (and even port the Android Dalvik VM to the PS3/4) to allow the same games to be played on their handheld, Game Cellphone, and tv console.

In the end, I don't think handheld gaming cell phones are an obsolete technology as much as I think they are a miss opportunity.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Citizen Z posted:

I still have an N-Gage QB key chain strap thing that I got while working for T-Mobile years ago. It was a dumb phone and no one ever tried to push them even with incentives, but the strap thing has served me well for years as a key chain doohickey.

Ladies and gentlemen, the most positive thing anyone has ever said about the ngage: the wrist strap is OK.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

Highen Fiber


Clapping Larry

WebDog posted:

On the first gen iphone you couldn't do multitasking or have a camera flash or a forward facing camera.
My aging P1 still held up fairly well feature wise. But dragging that out in an emergency did remind me how painfully clunky the UIQ3 interface was despite the phone managing to do everything I needed it to do.

First gen iPhone didn't have apps at launch, or GPS, or 3g, or MMS, or video, copy and paste, exchange email or any other kind of push email.

Basically, all smart phone users had good reason to be smug over iPhone users because the first gen iPhone weren't really smart phones by comparison.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

JediTalentAgent posted:

I don't know if it was ever mentioned in this thread, but Sega for a while had that "Activator" motion-controlled gaming accessory for the Genesis. It was a big octagon that you stood on and were supposed to be able to control games via body movement. I guess it probably worked as well as expected.

The following is maybe more of a 'never-was' tech, but around the same time Sega also prototyped and promoted and finally cancelled a planned Sega VR headset that would feature head-movement detection that was set to cost under $200.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwY-EaUQ_Yc

A lot of popular theories were that Sega would have eventually used both devices and maybe a game pad in conjunction with one another for creating a 16-bit at-home VR experience.

It sort of makes me wonder how the gaming industry would have moved forward if Sega had managed to get VR down in the 90s for home use. It's obvious the Genny version wouldn't have really been all that impressive due to the tech limits of the system, but I wonder if Sega had gotten it to market and gotten it accepted by consumers enough to see it as a good enough bet to develop the Saturn with VR in mind at the start.

VR was a really big gimmick in the early ninties, even though the technology wasn't really there yet. There were few big problems with early VR that pretty much killed it until recently.

1: Headsets were big and heavy making them uncomfortable

2: Displays were fairly low resolution, even by the standards of the time

3: LCD based head mounted displays had bad ghosting and poor pixel refresh times

4: Head tracking had a lot of lag

5: They were very expensive


Here we are 20 years later and the technology is finally caught up enough that people are interested and excited at the prospect of a truly immerse Virtual reality experience.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

And here I was thinking that they would have to cut the equipment off at the top of the concrete with a grinder and then dig the ceiling out 3 feet higher and start fresh.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

stealie72 posted:

This reminds me, at my first job we had a worst of both worlds item. It was a "projector" for a computer that was basically a transparency sheet for an overhead projector. Picture a really crappy LCD monitor (I think the resolution was like 800x600) that you can shine light through with a refresh rate that was so slow as to be visible. Basically a game boy color screen.

The worst part is that we would do presentations that involved hauling a portable overhead and this projection panel.

This was in 1998, so it's not like projectors weren't around, just pretty expensive.

We had one of those in Highschool at the same time as you. It was more or less just an LCD monitor, but with out a back on it and no built in light. As a mater of fact, I had seen instructions on line on how to make an overhead projector in to a video projector using an old LCD monitor and it looked pretty much like a DIY version of this thing.

We also had one that was specifically for a TI-83 calculator.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Mister Kingdom posted:

This was my first VCR, the Panasonic PV-1220. Top-load with a wired remote that only controlled fast forward, rewind, and pause functions only after you pressed play on the VCR itself.



We had a couple of these. They were incredibly good VCRs as far as reliability went. Must have had them for 10+ years.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

Humphreys posted:

I never got the Blackberry hype. People said it was great for business and what not, but I just don't know why any other established manufacturers weren't good enough. Was it just BBM?

Blackberry pretty much invented push email, had pretty good enterprise device management, and was pretty much designed around being an email device.

When Blackberry was still king of mobile enterprise email, Windows Mobile and Symbian 60 were pretty much your only other choices for a smart device. Neither of them had as good of battery life when dealing with email because they had to poll the servers on a set schedule or leave an open connection, both of which were battery hogs at the time.

KozmoNaut posted:



We had a guy come do a talk for us on WAP while I was at trade school taking electronics and programming. This was in 2003 or 2004, so WAP was pretty much already dead, or at least the writing was on the wall.

But this guy was absolutely adamant that WAP was the future, and that within a couple of years, the personal computer would be no more, since we would do everything on a mobile phone. He believed in it so hard that he had put all of his life savings into a WAP-focused company. While it's true that the original iPhone came out in 2007, nobody saw it coming, and it was still severely limited in what you could do with it.

A bunch of us got so tired of listening to his bullshit that we got up and started to walk out. He pretty much went "So! I guess only the smart and visionary people are left now, huh?"

To which one of my friends shot back "Nah, we were just leaving ".

Part of me wonders what happened to that guy, if he actually bombed and failed, or if he managed to get in early on the current wave of apps and mobile solutions. WAP died, but the idea of doing everything from a phone certainly hasn't.

While WAP has pretty much died off, mobile sites are the modern descendant of what WAP was, and if you look at it that way, that guy wasn't too far off the mark.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

KozmoNaut posted:

That's true in essence, but the severely-limited WML markup language and the concept of WAP-only sites with "decks" and "cards" died, as did the whole mobile WAP Internet separate from the real Internet. Ever since mobile devices gained proper HTTP/HTML-capable browsers, WAP has been obsolete, since it was much easier to develop mobile-friendly sites using proper "big Internet" HTML/PHP/ASP/etc., instead of with the idiosyncrasies and limitations of WAP.

And this guy was very particular that WAP was the future, not general Internet access on mobile devices. Several times he shot down the idea of general mobile Internet access, using the argument that the users would just end up confused, and that limited highly-specific WAP portals were the future. He had lots of examples of customized WAP portals that he had dreamt up for various businesses, it was nothing like the mobile versions of websites we know today. They were all incredibly limited in scope and ambition.

I will concede that WAP still lives on every time someone sends an MMS, but that's about it.

Oh shesh, that is terrible. Yeah, that guys was wrong.

KozmoNaut posted:

"Hack" is probably the right word for it. It is an implementation of data packets on the voice-optimized GSM network, originally meant for status messages and emergency warnings and the like. It piggybacks onto the control stream used for controlling voice calls, hence the 128-byte (160 7-bit characters) limit per message.

Because of their original intended use and small size, text messages usually get through even when the network is heavily loaded (for instance on Christmas or New Year's Eve) and voice calls fail to connect.

I work for a telco, and by far the largest income source aside from wholesale traffic from other operators, is text messaging. Think of it, it costs literally nothing to send 128 bytes. Even unlimited messaging plans have an absolutely ridiculous profit margin.

I always like this analogy.

SMS is like writing a message on the side of a box that UPS is shipping. The box was already being shipped and the message didn't make the box any harder to be shipped. But you are going to be charged more for the message than you were for the package.

Lowen SoDium
Jun 5, 2003

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Clapping Larry

uwaeve posted:

Not to interrupt the RIM hate, but from a few pages back there was some VCRchat.

In sometime like 1983-5, my dad bought a VHS camcorder/VCR combo. The VCR was split into two decks, one of which held the cassette. For using the camera. Like you were tethered to this huge europurse brick thing that weighed probably 30 pounds as you were trying to capture precious moments.

I can't find a good picture but you oldsters will know what I'm talking about.

On of my friend's families had one of these growing up. It was only a few short years later that 8mm and VHS-C handi-cams started coming out and that thing started looking extra ridiculous.

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Jun 5, 2003

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Collateral Damage posted:

The pre-installed thermal paste on most CPU coolers is pretty crap though. I always scrape it off and replace it with Arctic Silver.

Preapplied thermal interface materials on heat sinks are not as bad as people make them out to get. There is no denying that Arctic Silver and it's similars preform better, but usually not by a lot. But that is really only true on the first application. Thermal Interface materials are no good for a second application. If you ever have to remove or reseat your heatsink, you should always clean off the heatsink and CPU surface and re-apply a interface material.

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Jun 5, 2003

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Ozz81 posted:

That's my only gripe about pinless CPUs - with a bent pin on a processor, usually a razor between the pins or a mechanical pencil can bend it back straight easily. On a motherboard, not so much, especially when you consider how easy it would be to gently caress up the board. Speaking of that, anyone else glad that most CPU coolers don't have to be mounted with screwdriver pressure any more? These big fuckers were a pain and I was always afraid of gouging my board if I slipped:



Yeah, I killed a motherboard that way once. I have put hundreds of heatsinks on, and a huge number of them were that style clamp, so I guess I should count my self lucky that I only did it once.

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TerryLennox posted:

IBM sucks at making interfaces. The newest Lotus Notes STILL would not look out of place in Windows 3.11

It was only like 3 versions again that they made f5 refresh. Before that it was log out.

Super frustrating when you try to refresh your in box.

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ninmeister posted:

Lotus Notes is the worst thing for email. I don't get how anyone (including my job) uses Lotus Notes. What the hell does it have over anything else other than "frustratingly terrible program that runs like rear end no matter what"?

My company switched from Netscape Mail to Lotus Domino back a little over 10 years ago. The reason we went with Lotus instead of Exchange at the time was that Exchange didn't support single mailbox restores at the time (Lotus did) and that there were still a number of viruses that targeted Exchange/Outlook.

We are currently in the process of migrating to Office 365 and while the conversion is a pain, the system is so much better.

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Jun 5, 2003

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Computer viking posted:

As I've understood it, the main reason to use Lotus Notes is as a development platform, where email is just one of the features; it's supposedly a reasonable way to make enterprise-wide database/messaging things.

To my knowledge I've never been in the same building as an open Notes client, so I have no idea how true that is.

Pretty much this. Most of the reasons people hate Lotus Domino is because of Lotus Notes. The server piece is actually pretty robust and not too hard to work with if you have it set up correctly. And you can do a lot with it if you have a Domino apps development team.

But the Notes client is doesn't look or act much like a standard Windows app, more so on older version (older being 4+ years old). I know a number of our users unofficially used Outlook instead.

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