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Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





cowtown posted:

Ours was one of these, with a single slider for all the channels. It was really easy to get to channel 2 quickly!


old post, but it took me surprisingly little time to google up a picture of the cable dial I grew up with:

My parents were relatively early adopters of cable, my earliest TV memories involve using this on their old Zenith 18" tube back in 84-87. I still remember rapidly spinning it to make the TV spaz out and sound like a Cthulhu cultist on speed.

Here's (someone else's picture of) my first laptop, the Toshiba Portege T3600CT:

My uncle gave me his in '96 (actually a T3400)- it ran Windows 95 just barely, I ended up laboriously putting Slackware on it as it had a janky external floppy and no modem/ethernet card. It ran a 486-SX/66 with (I want to say) 4MB RAM. Came with a 4GB drive that I replaced with a 20GB model. I broke the screen dropping it one day, but managed to find a half-working T3600CT for cheap on ebay, and frankensteined them together into a slick 486-DX/100 machine that I just put FreeDOS on.

I used this machine all the way through college, at a time that doesn't seem that long ago but when school laptops were pretty rare in the liberal arts. It ran beautifully (still does, if I could find the power cable), and it was TINY for the time- smaller than and about as thick as a textbook, I wouldn't see a full-powered laptop smaller than this until netbooks were A Thing. Its best feature was that it'd last for ~8-12 hours on one charge, making it an ideal campus computer. I used it for writing and Sid Meier's Colonization well into the 2000s until I replaced it with a Celeron-based Dell. I really want to find a use for it, since it's just taking up space in my old computer box, but aside from gutting it and putting netbook parts in, I can't think of a purpose for the old beast.

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Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





WebDog posted:

And it happens to mention the RCA SlectaVision.


Oh man, a roommate of mine had one of these, plus about fifty movies, that he picked up at a flea market in '07 for like $80. It was weird in that the picture quality was generally better than VHS, but still had those little analog glitches.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





DarthBlingBling posted:

The first MP3 player I had was 32MB in size and could be expanded with memory cards of type that escape my memory (up to 32MB in size again).

I think I managed to squeeze an album onto it.

I had one of these:


32MB, non-expandable- and yup, about an album's worth, maybe a bit more if you compressed to warlby .wma files

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Base Emitter posted:



Ah, the quest for the less-terrible MP3 player.

this guy:

was my main music device for nearly a decade, until I lost it somewhere and replaced its functionality with my Android tablet

still miss it, it was so very tiny

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I had a cheap 110 camera as a kid in the early 90s, little more than a flat box with enough space for the film cartridge and flash capacitors. This was more or less ignored when 35mm one-time-use cameras came into vogue; I remember my mom buying bulk packs of the Kodak OTU cameras when we went on vacation, for my brother and I to use- she had her own higher-end 35mm, took a step backwards in dropping a huge amount of money on a Mavica, then got a Sony DSLR about five or six years ago that she still uses.

It seems kind of cliche to say so, but holy crap the Leonard 6 micro camera looks bulky and chunky as all hell compared to tiny digicams.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I learned manual transmission as well, in the mid-90s- I'm on my fourth car now, and it's my first car with automatic transmission, power windows, and a key fob... it is, however, a 1994 Ford Taurus, the oldest car I've ever owned.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





atomicthumbs posted:

you know you can move the gear selector down to "2" or "1" to make it stay in lower gears, right

Yeah this is a thing I didn't know until last winter, when I needed to restrict it to 1st gear in order to get out of the snowy uphill that is the only access to my apartment complex.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





dissss posted:

Serious question - how on earth did you get your license without knowing that?

Learned on a manual, and in Kansas, no less. Even if I had learned on an automatic, forcing 1st and 2nd gear doesn't really get much use around here, and I can't recall knowing how the car works to be a prerequisite for driving- it was mostly traffic rules and a quick driving test around the sparse part of town.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





nightchild12 posted:

edit: I use nano, because I am a pussy who can't handle obtuse, unfriendly UIs.

yeah I used nano on my slackware laptop since I mostly just used it to muck around with config files and the like, I'm generally quicker on GUI-based text editors, having used them for like twenty years now

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I still remember 71114,2750

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





SybilVimes posted:

it was, of course, poo poo, because it was really cheap and nasty, so a year or so later when I upgraded to a 386 motherboard I dropped it in favour of 2 3.5" drives (I didn't get my first HDD until '92 because until IDE became mainstream HDDs were too expensive or unreliable (ST506 was the cheapest, but often really crap, SCSI and ESDI were just too expensive)

The first PC we had in our house growing up was an Epson Equity II



Two 5.25" floppy drives, CGA color, and an 8088 processor- nothing special, and I remember happily playing Curse of the Azure Bonds at a glacial pace in glorious four colors. Battles took forever, as an arrow travelling from one side of the screen to the other took about five seconds to move one space, and for years I thought of 'azure' as being a cyan color.

The compy was scrapped about fifteen years ago after taking up space in the basement, though I do wish I had salvaged this out of it:



The HardCard, a solution for plunking an HDD on a system with ISA slots. This is the same one we had, with an insane 20MB of storage data, meant that DOS booted up in no time and thousands of elementary school reports/dot matrix printer banners could be saved. It's gotta be said, for a piece of technology that's a quarter of a century old, the HardCards look pretty slick and modern.

The Epson monitor blew out so my parents replaced it with a 486DX Packard Bell machine- back when Windows (3.1) ran on top of DOS, so most games were either activated by exiting Windows first, or by using a boot disk that loaded the bare minimum you needed to get Doom running.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Arsenic Lupin posted:

I really love mechanical stuff. It's magic, man. Moving parts, interlocking, and running for years and years and years if treated right. (glares at laptop)

So I get what you're saying and agree for the most part- but I've worked in computer repair, and the most likely components to fail in a laptop are ironically the only mechanical parts, the HDD disk or the optical drive. You could theoretically keep most computers running for decades (if you had access to the correct integrated circuits), I just don't know why you'd want to. Maybe if we hit some kind of plateau with computers, you'd see much more reusable and user-serviceable parts.

My roommate just got a universal AC adapter in the mail to replace one for a back massage cushion- thinking of using it to fire up my old 486DX laptop and see if it still runs. Probably still has FreeDOS on there if I recall what I was doing with it a decade ago correctly (taking class notes in EDIT.EXE and playing Colonization).

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





AFewBricksShy posted:

I wonder if anyone born after 2005 is going to wonder why the universal symbol for rolling down your window is moving your hand in a circle. Do they even make cars without power windows anymore?

pretty sure they're going to understand rollup windows unless every kid born after 2005 is upper-middle class, dude

new cars aren't exactly cheap for most people

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





evobatman posted:

Except that the GB Micro is awesome.

I loved my GBA-SP until the shoulder buttons got flaky. Not the best portable device I've owned, but the best up to that point, for sure- made a decent eBook reader (in 2005 terms) if you had a flash cart.

2000s in general seemed to have a lot of portables that made people complain about being too small for their hands, original XBox controller notwithstanding. I loved it, though, I'm a real short dude and things like the SP and the Micro and my tiny 80x400x600mm phone fit perfectly.

Did anyone else have one of those ultra-slim Sony-Ericsson Walkman phones? Aside from the proprietary power/headphone adapter, it may have been my favorite dumbphone. Would spend dollars on a Bluetooth device about the same size I could take and make calls and not much else from.

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





DocCynical posted:

That's a big loving phone. I think you missed a decimal point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27aVPqpnL7Y

Oh hahahaha duhhhhh yup
Was thinking in cm, and converted totally wrong- I just have less of an idea what 8mm is in my native inches- always been better at estimating sizes smaller than half a foot in metric.
Leaving it unedited as a monument to American education

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

The SP would've been 11/10 if it had a goddamn headphone jack

Micro supremacy

A-loving-greed. I had a few cheap adapters (MADCATZ!) I'd carry around in case one of em flaked

Pilsner posted:

I'm curious though, which phone is 8x40x60mm?

I guess I'm terrible at estimating sizes in general, but I'm talking about the Sony Ericsson W350, easily the coolest looking phone I've ever owned- but yeah its closer to 1x4x10cm: http://www.gsmarena.com/sony_ericsson_w350-2198.php

Would still love to have a lil one of these that could Bluetooth up with the nice-but-chunkier LG G4 I carry around, it was just such a sexy little device (even though the flip part was paper thin and fell off after a couple years)

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Aw my 36", 16x9, 280lb, 480-line Samsung flat tube I bought new for like $300 only lasted about four years before the cathode ray made a *SPLONNNK* sound and stopped working. Luckiy those were the four years that LCD TVs went from used car prices to used appliance prices

I kinda miss it, component looked sharper than any other tube TV, and the colors were amazing. It being SD, though, it'd probably be relegated to emulator duty nowadays

Peanut Butler has a new favorite as of 00:46 on Mar 9, 2016

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





To be fair, it seems like it's only been in the last couple years that voice recognition picks up a flat American accent with any degree of accuracy

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I have a couple mid-century lamps with free-rotating, non-clicky power knobs that you only know are on when the light goes on- which works for incandescent bulbs. But on CFs I find myself slowly rotating the knob until I see the tube fire- if I rotate too far, gotta go all the way around again, as going backwards just unscrews the switch

It'll be less of a problem when I can afford to go 100% LED but still, minor pain in the rear end

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





RC and Moon Pie posted:

Looking for scores, TV listings, golf tips, soap opera updates or even nursery rhymes for the kiddos? Welcome to 1993.



Holy poo poo haven't thought about these in years

I used to use a similar service as a kid to take calls from friends late at night, using call waiting so as not to wake my parents. Call waiting sure isn't obsolete, but the lack of it seems to be- I heard a busy signal the other week and it threw me for a loop

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I got the silver version of the F-91W and it's great because I have lil wrists and like to know what time it is

it's been my only wristwatch for like ten years, best twenty bucks or so I've spent on an accessory in a while

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





bad posts ahead!!! posted:

casio babywrist crew

aww yeah

like 80% of men's watches from 1990-2010 seem to be giant tacticool carbuncles that words like 'elegant' or 'cute' disintegrate on contact with- a heftier boy can pull them off but they look like dystopian child tracking shackles on me. Felt like it was that or a too-femmy watch so when I got a Kyocera candybar I stopped wearing watches until this guy was on sale somewhere:



turns out they have a whole line of these, with different colors and one with an inverted display and crap I wanna buy a bunch of the same watch now

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





twistedmentat posted:

I am so glad they stopped making different Wide and Fullscreen dvds. Even up to 2007 or 8 we were still selling them at HMV. I think it was when Blurays came out they stopped, or the companies just got sick of people bitching about their copy of Con Air looking weird.

We'd see them show up in cheap dump bins around xmas.

the only DVD I still own is the first DVD I bought, Das Boot, it's a double-sided disc with widescreen on one side and 4:3 on the other

in twenty years the 4:3 side has never been played

I was also blown tf away by being able to switch between subs and dubs on the fly, and bless my old Mintek DVD player, the first gen of ~$100 players that would also play .avi files burned to a CD

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





oh man that makes me think of my first vacuum as an adult, an old steel Kirby upright
it was:
-really amazing at its job IF you spent the requisite half hour or so cleaning it out every time
-a beautiful piece of machinery with that clean midcentury line thing goin on
-extremely simple to repair, esp because vacuum repair shops that sold old parts were still a thing until 2010 or so
-heavy as all hell, like had to be about 50 or 60 lbs

replaced it years ago with an early model from the new generation of ultralight plastic swiffer-lookin vacuums and never looked back, but sometimes I miss how the old Kirby just worked right every time, only ever needed one pass over a spot of carpet

but mostly I forget how much of a hassle it was to roll around tight spaces and how it made my upper back ache, lol

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





yeah a lotta non-capitalist states that survive have a siege mentality from all the constant ideological siege


so I found my very first laptop from the 90s the other day while rummaging through things, a Toshiba Portege T3600CT- this thing is marvelous. It's a 486DX/75 that could run for 6-8 hours on a charge, and was super small for the time- about the footprint of a netbook but much thicker, about the size and weight of a college textbook

Can't find the adapter or the floppy drive, but I might have to do some ebaying and restore this lil guy. The keyboard isn't as good as modern ones, but it's solid- it has a mouse nipple with a stock nub that melts into putty, but I replaced mine with a tougher sandpapery one from an old Dell. Many good hours playing Civilization and LucasArts games on this thing, swapping out the PCMCIA network card for a sound card when needed

used to serial network it to my 90s gaming desktop and use it solely as a minimap for crazy Doom wads

not my pictures, but oh~ this machine





Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Dick Trauma posted:

When I was a kid this style of address book was a common alternative to the Rolodex. You'd move the slider on the right to the letter you were interested in and press the button. The address book would spring open to the first page of that letter.

The pages had little tabs on them to register with the slider, and as those tabs wore out the address book would become useless.



hell yeah, growing up, my folks had a slick 80s plastic-and-faux-leather version of the same thing- looked different, same mechanism, mostly got busted out for christmas cards

you had to write new addresses in with gaps between em, in case someone changed address and you needed room

putting an entry right below another was an assurance that the person above was probably staying at the same address for a while

e: starting to remember why I was so stoked about getting one of these in the late 90s:

Peanut Butler has a new favorite as of 19:05 on May 14, 2019

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





ReidRansom posted:

Or maybe just use a pencil.

thx for the advice 25yrs too late, lol-

my folks werent exactly big into foresight when it came to small details of life like that

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Unperson_47 posted:

I remember when they started making these personal organizer devices that could communicate with each other via IR or RF. ( I dont' remember which) I wanted one SO BAD so I could talk to the friends I didn't have in class.

aww yeah!

I wanted the model that had a little microphone and speaker on the back, that you could hold up to any phone, dial their number, and sync email/articles- but it had some kind of ridiculous monthly fee that rly wasn't worth it to write emails in class to internet pals to send later on a payphone

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Horace posted:

Well, of course it's a modem, but if you tell someone "my personal organiser has a modem" they picture you untangling a long white phone cord and moving a night stand so you can plug it into the phone jack in a hotel room. The acoustic coupler makes you feel like a spy.



awww yeah that's the one, it seemed so futuristic to me to do email on a lil pocket device. I used to play Diplomacy via email, and just wanted to be able to write my orders during class and commit 'em over lunch

still loved that Sharp Wizard, tho, got pretty fast typing on a v lovely keyboard

Queen Combat posted:

I remember we updated our LG washing machine by dialing a number and holding the phone to a place on the control panel. It was sold only with super-water-saving mode enabled but an over-the-phone update let it default to the 5 gallon setting so clothes would actually wash.

Had a remote that did the same thing. Conical/triangular Sony universal remote that you could stand up on it's butt. Had a phone update setting, you could dial into Sony and tell them your model of TV and amplifier and it would do a program thing.

see there are two things I wouldn't have guessed did a softmodem handset passthru thing, that's wild
prolly better than everything being on wifi though

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Shut up Meg posted:

I have a lot of affection for dot matrix printers and I've just realised why:



2,300 sheets from a single box.
None of that 'PC Load Letter' bullshit or having to fill the papertray every time you want to print anything: that bastard would stay full for a whole month.

And it never jammed, either. As long as no-one dropped something heavy on the paper as it was fed, it would motor on relentlessly.

oh yeah, that was excellent! growing up we had a p cheap epson printer, so sometimes the cogs would tear at some of the guide strips on the side and you'd have to realign some new paper- but it was a really easy fix

I remember when my parents went over to inkjet, but still had like two or three boxes of dot matrix feed paper- most of printing stuff for high school papers involved a lot of perforation tearing

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





the college I dropped out of in the early 00s didn't clean up old .edu email addresses, going back to the 70s, until a few years ago

I mean the last thing I used it for was to sign up for facebook over a decade ago, when you had to be a college student to use it, so whatever, but it was a small 'aw man'

e: because I listed my gmail as a backup address with the university, since cleaning the email addresses, they send me Alumni Association donation requests- lol I dropped out of that school twice and then pretended to be a student for a couple years so I could keep doing a radio show

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





mystes posted:

Presumably he was doing a show on the college radio station and kept doing it after dropping out? I don't think that is going to be much of a story.

Or are you just asking why he dropped out twice?

yeah that's p much it, it was a comedy hour my buddies and I did, and after I dropped out I just kept going to radio station meetings and the like. pretty large University, so nobody suspected (or prolly cared, outside of administration)

(also not he lol :x)

the obsolete tech I remember from there were decades worth of SFX tracks on tape and CD- the CDs were already obsolete ten years ago because we'd need to rip the audio to digital in order to edit the show together in Audition

we did a lot of accidental digital preservation there; had some rad old degrading 8-track BBC foley tapes that are now preserved on a server SFX folder somewhere

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





SubG posted:

I don't know about yours, but it's pretty common for university radio stations to be operated by the university but be officially open to the wider community. This was decades ago, but the place where I was an undergrad was required to accept applications from members of the community outside the university as part of getting the spectrum.

we had one show that was grandfathered in- same show still runs, but it got handed off to students a while ago

I remember having to show my college ID to the faculty member that was the station manager- which worked great because
-no expiration date
-the photo was from when I was 19, and I was 24 at the time, but nobody past sophomore year looked like their ID photos anymore

we always said that if someone caught on and tried to get us in trouble, we'd just say that I was a special guest every week, but it never came up

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Pham Nuwen posted:

They also killed the building numbers in favor of 3-letter abbreviations, which we hated.

lol the only place I've seen this was at a community college, and three-letter building codes has been their deal since the 60s. the thing I hated was when they replaced the building signage from these huge, bold, white letters bolted directly to the upper corner of the building- which is how it was when my mom went back to school in the early 90s- with big blue plastic circles with smaller letters on em that were there by the time I went in the 00s

granted, it's weirdly prestigious for a community college, consistently ranked top 1% nationwide, almost became the first Community University, resides in one of the wealthiest counties in the midwest- but still, lol @ chasing the cutting edge innovation of county community colleges

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





yeah I bought one in High School and it was pretty immediately obvious that I was like five or six years too old for it

got way more hacky fun out of my TI calculators anyway, even tho their only comms was (and still is iirc) a 2.5mm jack- USB adapters these days, but serial back in ye day

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





Horace posted:

Here's something I'd never seen before. A laptop with a translucent screen, so it can be placed on an overhead projector.





It comes with a little stand for when it's on the projector.



A reminder of the days when an LCD projector cost more than a car.

oh poo poo we had these in turn of the century high school, the ti calc ones too

always feel an urge to buy one of those old translucent projectors when I see em at Goodwill or wherever, to mod an old LCD panel onto for a cheap novelty projector- but then I remember how fuckin hot those things got from sometimes being fated to sit next to them in elementary school

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I haven't had a bank account for a while due to poverty reasons, and the last couple pages are like reading what the future is going to be like when I can finally have one again

it's probably the most antiquated sector of my life, that I take payroll checks to either the bank that issues them or the grocery store, and get cash that I then budget using a series of envelopes and a 'walkin around money' drawer. Buying stuff online usually just means exchanging cash to a friend with a debit card, and I pay bills either in person or using a friend's card. If someone needs to get funds to me personally, it's gotta be Western Union or a face-to-face visit

I also pay rent by money order, driving across town to the rental office to put it in a lil metal box- but where I live, rent has only verrrry recently been something you can pay online with most management companies, and the only reason a lot of people would still use the one free checkbook most banks would give you. It's wild, though, the first people I ever rented from, like in 2003, would take PayPal- and then it was just checks until my management company rolled out their online pay system in 2018

lookin forward to joining the rest of you in the 90s, once I pay off some debts that make having a checking account more expensive than eating money order fees and the like

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





frosted translucent plastic

not a right-angle to be seen

"vtech"

it's a design I am immediately drawn to and disgusted by at once

Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





yah I was gonna say it went back a little bit further, I kinda miss the aesthetic of the clear/grey kind even though I generally prefer a more 80s smoked/hard edge/silver/woodgrain look

everything was so blobby, too, even before the iMac- my first MP3 player was the second (?) gen Diamond Rio, departing from the rectangular Rio to be in the shape of a thing that does not exist

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Peanut Butler
Jul 25, 2003





I assumed it was to make it easier to free up the motion a bit if it seizes up

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