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Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


I had one of these and thought it was the best MP3 player ever made.



It broke after about 2 years and I upgrade to this beast:

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Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Arivia posted:

That looks like an entire laptop sized hard disc in there. My god.

That's exactly what it is. 5 gig 2.5" hard drive.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


All this talk of small phones reminds me of this dumb thing I had for a year or so before getting a 'smart' windows phone.

The Siemens SL55


It was so stupidly small that it was almost impossible to type/text on without hitting multiple keys at the same time. Barely had any storage for numbers/texts and wasn't even a good form factor. But hey, I had the smallest phone out of all of my friends. Also all the buttons started breaking after about 12 months.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


MadScientistWorking posted:

That is stupid though because you should be able to buy a high end oscilloscope fairly cheaply. An old engineering trick which extends out to almost every single product you can imagine is that for every high brand product line that one can find you can find a cheaper variant from which the only difference is in name only.

Or buy a used one in a government surplus sale.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Just sign up for an ING account and they'll print and mail your checks for you. Problem solved.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


BoutrosBoutros posted:

I was watching "A Time to Kill" on DVD and had to flip it over halfway through. Was there a time when DVD's couldn't hold a whole movie per side? I don't think there was, but for some reason, that DVD only has half the movie on each side.

I think it depended on the length of the movie and the encoding quality. I vaguely remember that in the early days you could get better quality with a two sided disc for some reason.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Today is the 30th anniversary of the CD going on sale. Also it was only last year that digital overtook CD sales. Looks like CDs are going the way of obsolete.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/...feeling-its-age

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


All this talk about Aiwa brings me way back.

I had this thing all through middle / high school / college and only got rid of it a few years ago although at that point the only thing that worked was the radio and aux in. It was beast.



I remember listening to the radio and whenever the song would change being ready to record the next one if it's something I wanted onto the tape deck. Then napster showed up.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


b0nes posted:


Is this being used anymore? I always assumed it was an East coast thing, I cant remember seeing any of these in California.

Airpots all over the East Coast.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


I also made some dough in early highschool by burning napster mp3s for $5 a pop. I think my burner was only a 2x and I had to convert every mp3 to a wav for it to burn right.

Then in college I moved onto moding xboxs and loaded them up with bigger hard drives and tons of games or just burning the games to dvd...those were the days.

DrBouvenstein posted:

No one ever remembers Scour.

I moved onto Direct Connect after the napster downfall. Someone ran the server on the school's network (which had no bandwidth limits inside the network) and restricted it to the school's ip addresses. It was amazing.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Geoj posted:

By 2002 HDD-based players were well below the price point and factors of magnitude more convenient to load (legal) music onto - drop CD into computer, rip to digital format and transfer to player in under 10 minutes vs. 1:1 dub from original format to MD, not to mention being able to carry an entire library of music on a single device without having to change out media.

gently caress yeah they were.



I used this thing for probably 3-4 years until the hard drive finally got so hosed up that it wouldn't spin anymore and I resigned myself to an Ipod which at the time I thought was inferior because I think RockBox was out by then.

I picked this is up in 2001 a bit after they came out. For some reason Circuit City was having a 50% off or so sale on them and I got my 17 year old rear end down to Circuit City as fast as I could that Sunday morning after I saw the ad in the paper.

Plinkey has a new favorite as of 04:02 on Jun 28, 2013

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


stealie72 posted:

They do. And from the same era as the trains, they worked roughly as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Comet

Didn't they basically learn from the Comets and then over-built planes for the next 20+ years like the BAC-111. I've flown in a few of these and they are built like tanks for hold old they are.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAC-111

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


empty baggie posted:

I still have my Zelda watch, but unfortunately I can't get it to work anymore. I'd still rock that watch like a boss, and have sometimes thought of wearing it anyway, but I know I would get asked about it everywhere and have to admit I was wearing a broken watch.

I still have one of these bad boys laying around:



I'm pretty sure it still works and just needs a battery. I remember when I got it for a birthday or something from the jewelry/watch kiosk in JCPennys or something like that. I was the poo poo at school.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Krispy Kareem posted:

Meh, those are scrubs. I was using trackballs in the 80's on my PCjr.

Speaking of failed technology:



I've had this thing for 6 or 7 years, it's currently glowing bluely on my desk. I've never found a use for it. I've only seen one in the wild and that's for kids to sign in for appointments at my daughter's orthodontist.

So cool, so pointless. I guess it's not a total failure since you can still buy them, but I have no idea what they're being used for.

That reminds me of this thing that a lot of our CAD guys swear by:



I have no idea how it works, but it looks purrdy.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


semiavrage posted:

I was reading earlier in the thread about Microsoft BOB and the Pac Bell Navigator. Both crappy "room metaphor" guis that ran over Windows.

When I was in elementary school we had something like this, but it wasn't BOB or navigator. It might actually have had an education focus... anyone know what I'm talking about?

I remember the most that textbooks and activities lived on a virtual "bookshelf," and that you could do anything you could do on a regular computer, like the internet.

Probably between 1999-2001... This is all I can remember but now I'm curious.

If it was a Mac possibly At Ease?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_Ease

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Killer robot posted:

It's funny how if Sony hadn't fought the MP3 market so hard they could have owned it from the ground floor.


I had a number of MP3 players before my smartphone took over, starting with one of the earliest CD MP3 players and ending with a 16GB Sansa I still have around. (It was the second largest actually, after the 20GB Nomad Zen.)

The iRiver I had was in there too. Best CD-based player I had before I got the Zen, little and slim with a cool remote and all, convenient for listening to while biking. It was too thin to use AA batteries: it came with a custom set of rechargables, about the same size but shaped like packs of gum.


Too many buttons. Too much tech.

Behold the Genica GN803 Tavarua.



This this was the first cd based mp3 player and I played the poo poo out of it. You couldn't navigate folders that I remember so if you dumped 650 megs of 4-5 meg mp3s on a CD's root you had to memorize the alphabetical order of ~145 songs or just put it on shuffle. I think I actually carried around a list of what was on each of my like 5 cds printed at something like 6 point font if I wanted to find something quick towards the end of HS.

It was amazing. Then I got an Archos 2000 which lasted until 2005-6 or something stupid when I finally gave into an ipod mini.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


JediTalentAgent posted:

We've talked different film and cameras before, and I can't remember if we've mentioned the '110 spy camera'.

I remember it being really pushed around the time of the film "Leonard Part 6", so I think it might have had a part or just been a promotional thing in the movie, but it was a barely more than a 110 film cartridge case with a lens on it. Extremely small, very low grade. Eventually even after their initial push with the movie they showed up everywhere and they kept selling them for probably quite a few years until more traditional 110s started to be cheaper and/or phased out.

I guess it's design is more commonly known as a "Micro 110"

YES! I got one of these http://www.acsupplyco.com/estes/estes_astrocam.htm and could not find the 110 film locally. It also destroyed itself on first launch due to shoddy construction and a non opening parachute .

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


moller posted:

It could probably also do math without screwing up, much unlike my Pentium 60.

Astrophysicist from the early 90s spotted.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Vanagoon posted:

What caused the gigantic increase in clock-speeds around that time? Was the P6 Architecture that much more efficient with it's decoding x86 into micro-ops or was it just process tech improvements?

Pretty much just following Moore's law.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004



?

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Dogan posted:

Out of This World came packaged with a crazy code wheel (in two parts) that you had to use to decode certain keys the game would ask for before you could start playing.

I always like Wofpack's http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfpack_(video_game) copy protection. You had to find a quote/sentence/word/phrase/technical info or something like that in a 50+ page manual and type it in when the game started. My uncle copied the disks for me and wrote down like 5 of the answers. So I had to restart the game over and over again until one randomly came up.

e: While looking up random Wolfpack stuff I found this. Brings back the memories.

Plinkey has a new favorite as of 05:55 on Jul 2, 2014

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


umalt posted:

I imagine that a large part of being able to rent Sega games back in the 90's was due to the fact that Nintendo was always resistant to the idea of people renting games. So to get a lead in the market Sega of America did the opposite, make it easy for stores to rent out Genesis games, which got them a ton of brownie points from retailers that Nintendo didn't. I assume that Sega of Europe followed suit so that they could gain some market-share from game rentals.

Sega also did this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sega_Channel which was awesome. I had sega channel for about a year or two before it got replaced by an N64. It did sometimes take up to 5-6 minutes to download the 500ish kb games though. Worth the wait.

This is how I discovered shinning force.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Christmas Present posted:

So I get what you're saying and agree for the most part- but I've worked in computer repair, and the most likely components to fail in a laptop are ironically the only mechanical parts, the HDD disk or the optical drive. You could theoretically keep most computers running for decades (if you had access to the correct integrated circuits), I just don't know why you'd want to. Maybe if we hit some kind of plateau with computers, you'd see much more reusable and user-serviceable parts.

Yes, you can the problem with that is that a motherboard would cost like $20k+. There's an industry that has been doing this exact thing for years, pretty much everything micro-electronics in defense related stuff is built to last for obscene amounts of time and be repairable. It's how you have 30-40 year old hardware still running. The qualification of every part is absurd and the whole system even more so but things still fail sometimes. It's really just not worth the cost in the consumer market. It's a cost vs profit thing.

Also electrons moving around is totally mechanical if you get down far enough...kinda.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Exit Strategy posted:

Daisy-chained.

What is this GPIB?

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Ensign Expendable posted:

I bought some joystick that came with instructions on how to best map controls to use it with an FPS. How you could play an FPS with a joystick comfortably (aside from MechWarrior, maybe), I have no idea.

I used to play fps with a joystick + mouse. Joy stick to move/mouse to look, it was the closest to what is basically an xbox controller now before they existed. I had my hand down around the bottom of the joystick not at the top, it worked really well for Quake 3 (pretty sure that was the game).

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Pretty sure it was out of sight out of mind. No one was thinking about ever taking care of them. The house I grew up in had a razor slot. When we redid the bathroom in the 90s there was a probably 5" high pile of razors in the wall. House built in the 30s.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Zopotantor posted:

That's very optimistic. I had to write some RS232 driver code just a few months ago.

Me too, well I'm about to. There just isn't any other good way to programmatically control power supplies and crap like that in a lab environment.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


NLJP posted:

This was a long rear end time ago and I was a really dumb kid but I seem to remember that with pre-MacOSX it was pretty easy to delete or disable vital plugins. Confirm or deny?

The whole plugin system hosed with us in general considering we were mostly there to play games on our parent's computer without the guidance of the internet, mostly.

Do you mean like force quitting Finder and everything else except one program to make poo poo run faster? Maybe that was really early OSX, I forget. We did that a lot in HS programming to free up ram for compiling because the computers had poo poo for ram and it sped it up x2 basically.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


JediTalentAgent posted:

This reminded me of a story Larry King told about working in radio.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yD8PzFFNFU

This is great, I've been listening to these for the past hour or so.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Dewgy posted:

This makes more sense to me than use limits for replacement. You have one use license to lend out, so one person gets it at a time.

That's how my local library did it last time I looked, the wait list for most stuff was like months.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004



I have this, and actually used it a lot for work conference calls from home when I was 3 time zones away and didn't want to come into the office at 5 am because the speaker on my phone was basically indecipherable in a conference call.

e: I got mine for like $3 from woot at some point though. I don't think I'd pay $20.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


WebDog posted:

Himalayan Sea Salt anyone! It's gluten free!

I bought some chicken breasts a few weeks ago, they had a big gluten free sticker on them...I would loving hope that they are.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Tunicate posted:

My first programming teacher had us put our midterm assignments onto floppies.

He went by the vet later that day, forgot he still had our assignments in his jacket pocket, and got a complimentary fridge magnet

This was me in 2002 and it was already obsolete by then. My laptop at the time didn't have a floppy drive so I had to buy one.

E: College freshman programming.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


CoolCat posted:

Am I the only one here who bought a Sega SACD player?

And Sega Channel.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004



Ethanol is apparently bad for fiberglass gas tanks, and anything that isn't run a lot because it can hold like 1% or something water. Boats/jetskis are basically all fiberglass. I think there's some additives you can add or it might not be an issue in newer boats but lots of boats people are still using are 15+ years old when it wasn't really a concern and you could get E0 pretty much everywhere.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


TotalLossBrain posted:

All that said, ethanol is terrible for various seals and rubber diaphragms in the carburetors of older 2-stroke skis.

Ah, I only knew about the ethanol messing up seals and stuff, and the only place around here to find it is at marinas or small specialty gas stations near tracks (or close to docks/marinas).

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


xlevus posted:

I think ~12 years ago, when I was 16-17, I had one of these:



And one of these:



And I'd use bluetooth to connect to the internet over GPRS and sit on IRC/ICQ in class. When teachers asked me what I was doing "Taking Notes". I took barely any notes, and the notes I did take were either full of spelling errors or illegible scribbles.

Seriously, what did a 16 year old need with a loving PDA? Your schedule is wake up, go to school, follow a pattern of classes that you do every drat week, go home and pretend you've got no homework.

Oh man. Still nostalgic about my N900. If the Neo900 didn't pick a lovely processor from 3 centuries ago, and make the thing bigger. I'd probably buy one.



I had one of these and you could use it with dial-up. I had some absurd amount of minutes for the time (1500 I think) so I'd blow my minutes dialing into my college's 56k modems during class or wherever. All my friend called it my 'shoe phone' all of the software was just terrible and it was almost impossible to actually find any software for it. I don't even think it had wifi I think I had it for about 2 years before going to one of these:



Which was the buggiest biggest pile of poo poo I had ever used, but I could get on the internet! It was so buggy that sometimes when I set an alarm it would get stuck, as in i delete the alarm and it still goes off at 7 am the next day or whatever even though it's not in the clock. The only way to get rid of that was to reset the whole system. loving windows phones from that era.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


GOTTA STAY FAI posted:

The flash card reader I installed a while back has a helpful searingly-bright blue LED that lets me know my PC is, in fact, plugged in. Don't know what I'd do without it!

My monitor and laser printer have searingly bright blue/green LEDs, and the printer like to blink randomly because the computer is off. Now the printer is off/asleep but it panics because it can't find mama computer or something. Electrical tape it where it's at.

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


Delivery McGee posted:

Edit: My mom still pays the monthly subscription to use the AOL client (or did until it went under, if it has).

They got bought by Verizon a few months ago, at this point it's mostly a content house. I think they are completely out of the ISP business.

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Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004


JediTalentAgent posted:

The paper bus tickets reminded me of something: The Subway free sandwich stamps.

(Maybe the trading stamp concept, in general.)

Buying a whole roll of these on ebay let me eat cheap for like a year in college until they got rid of them/stopped honoring them. I think it came out to like $2.50 for a footlong + drink, after the stamps cost.

e: They were all sequentially numbered too, but no one gave a poo poo.

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