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sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Landerig posted:

I want to see Blu-Ray drives and writable media drop some more in price because I have a lot of videos recorded to DVD-R's that I'd love to consolidate onto a 30 GB disc. Just did a price check and they have gotten pretty cheap. Hmmm.

One downside to flash drives is as far as I know, you can't really write protect them. SD cards you can, but it's more a feature of the drive then the actual card. A disc is much harder to accidentally erase.

Also, aren't flash drives susceptible to magnets as well?

Some flash drives have write lock switches. SD card write lock is NOT mandatory for the host to pay attention to.

Flash drives are not susceptible to any magnetic field you can manage to put through them, no.

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sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



People complaining about US banks are baffling me. If your bank doesn't have free online bill payment, including the ability to print and mail a check to smaller companies, get a better bank.

Direct person to person electronic transfers are becoming fairly common as well (ING has this, for example), even if you are for some reason ignoring the existence of paypal, amazon, google, and others.

Bank accounts, checking accounts, everything is free in the US. In many other parts of the world, they charge you all kinds of fees, including monthly fees just for having an account.

Furthermore, paying with plastic is much less common in Europe at least compared to the US. Many people in Europe are still primarily using cash, and many establishments simply don't take any forms of plastic payments. And RFID/NFC payment? Forget it.

The US is way ahead (of Europe, at least) in all of this.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Pilsner posted:

A lot of people pay with plastic in Europe? Even obscure little shops in Southern Europe will accept a VISA. Where did you read that people pay with cash? Maybe you're thinking of Asia (or more specifically China).

I didn't read it; I have experienced it firsthand. I live in Austria and I spent 6 months in France a while ago and I've visited 24 countries in Europe.


Dick Trauma posted:

I haven't seen a residential or commercial fusebox in a long time. I'm wondering how common they still are. Everything I've worked with since the 1990s has been circuit breakers.



They're still common anywhere older houses exist because upgrading can be very costly.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Jibo posted:

I just got a house that I almost didn't get because the drat thing had a 60 Amp fuse box that had been junctioned off of twice. The people living there had five TVs, three computers, two fridges, a mini fridge, washer and dryer, an electric range, and all their regular household poo poo running off of it, including 16 60 Watt bulbs in recessed lighting in the basement.

Thankfully they just agreed to get it updated before we moved in.


It cost ~$3,500 US to get ours upgraded.

Yeah, coincidentally I paid about the same last year for a pretty thorough overhaul.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



axolotl farmer posted:

I found this in the computer room flotsam at work.



From that awkward time in the 1990s when CDRs were unknown and there was a market for >1,44M magnetic media. Zip drives were the most common ones.

This is one of the forgotten brands, I had never seen one before I found this in a pile of old junk.

Are you throwing that away?????????

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



I use 3.5" floppy diskettes (well, more precisely, a single 3.5" floppy diskette) several times per week to transfer programs off a non-networked 486 running windows 3.1 and controlling a ~$1M piece of scientific equipment.

I actually enjoy using computer equipment and software spanning 25 years on a daily basis. It's living history.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Those xray bootlegs are loving awesome.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



The_Franz posted:

Until just a couple of years ago AT&T still charged an extra fee for touch-tone service on their business land-lines.

I'm old enough to remember when touch tone was an upgrade for residential service in my area. My babysitter's house had touch tone and I was fascinated with it.

Also, I have successfully made phone calls (to the correct number) by manually tapping out the numbers and pauses with the hook. In so doing, I also made several successful phone calls to the incorrect numbers but hey it's a small price to pay.

If you have an analog landline, you can try it for yourself. Get ready to apologize to random strangers though.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Parallel Paraplegic posted:

I kind of thought you could just do it with some kind of negative-feedback photoresistor setup like that, but he holds it up at the beginning and there doesn't seem to be any kind of light source, and the "sensors" seem to be white plastic blobs. I guess it's probably just this, though, maybe using IR instead. Thanks!

EDIT: There isn't even a light in the schematics you linked, I am an idiot

You aren't an idiot. Those simple designs do require some light source. Also if you continue reading the page that was linked, they do eventually add an LED so they don't need to worry about adjusting for ambient light levels, which they also discuss a bit.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006




I had (probably still have) the one on the left.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Impact Damage posted:

I've always had a soft spot for the Minolta RD-175:


Cost a mere $10,000 in 1995 and boasted a resolution of 1.75 megapixels. In order to achieve a full color image, light was split with a prism into three different sensors (two for green and one that was split across red and blue) and then recombined for a color image.

Sample Photos and an overview.

Then there's the Minolta RD-3000:


Cost about $4,500 in 2000, this time splitting the actual image captured in half with a prism, both halves going to two separate 1.5 mp sensors. The camera would then stitch the two halves together for a final 2.7 megapixel image.

Sample Photos and an in depth review.

Finally, while digging around looking for those two cameras I came across the Minolta Still Video Back SB-90S:



307.2 K glorious pixels!

excellent post. I loved seeing the sample images.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



I intended to volunteer for a very old theater in my previous city. They trained me on the projectors they had. 35mm affairs with carbon-arc lighting (loving cool). Two projectors were used for each movie, and a foot switch near the window would allow you to watch for the "cigarette burn" and stomp the switch to change to the next reel. It was really cool.

I went in a few times but they had a bunch of projectionists already and I never got any shifts. It was fun to learn and operate that old stuff though.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Farbtoner posted:

In retrospect it is pretty ridiculous that we spent decades sitting in front of what was effectively a giant ray gun at work and at home.
why?

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Eh. No.

CRTs are particle accelerators but the energies produced are very small and while x-rays are produced as a result of the deceleration of the particles at the screen, the leaded glass is more than sufficient to absorb it.

LCDs simply modulate white light produced by a CCFL tube or LEDs. Light rays and particle beams (also called rays) are quite different.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



CRTs will always have a place in my heart and in my massive collection of obsolete technology.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



One lick of a small radium paint soaked brush tip is, imo, an enormous amount of radium to ingest. Gram for gram it is one million times more radioactive than natural uranium.

Radium dial watches generally don't glow anymore, but that's not because they are no longer radioactive. Rather, the phosphorescent pigments of the day were kind of lovely and wore out relatively quickly. The radium is still going absolutely bonkers.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Glitterbomber posted:

Didn't the dude behind Kellogg think that all his products would be best used shot up the rear end?

For a good hunk of modern life we were pretty sure, as a culture, that the secret to immortality was just finding the right mixture of something going up your butt.

The Mayans are known to have practiced the art of the beer enema. Sticking things up our butts goes back a long time.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



By the way, back on the subject of pneumatic tubes: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories...new-lab-659479/

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Axeman Jim posted:

Fairly sure when I was last in Paris they were still using these for the exit turnstiles on the Metro.

I can confirm this. Bit of a different scenario though.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Donkwich posted:

Does Europe still have a lot of paternosters? As an American I've always wanted to ride one, and I guess the reason they haven't brought them to the states is that they are lawsuit bait. Or they're actually dangerous as gently caress. I don't know.

I've never seen one of those in my life. I think I'd make a special weekend trip just to ride one.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Parallel Paraplegic posted:

Did any of you ever use a light pen?



We had one at my school that was horribly inaccurate, though it was probably uncalibrated all to hell.

Light pens do not require calibration.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Jasper Tin Neck posted:

Most countries dry clothes outside. The US doesn't because many home owners associations have rules against it on the grounds that it makes neighbourhoods look poor.

No, we do it because we have natural gas infrastructure in most places, and plenty of room for a full size washer and a dryer. It also is much less work and takes about 1/10 the time of air drying.

I posit that the vast majority of housing in the US is not subject to HOA rules and still most people will use dryers rather than the air.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



madlilnerd posted:

I never understood that. If you live somewhere sunny and you're not right next to the freeway or a dusty desert or a rendering plant, it makes way more sense to dry your clothes outside. They feel fresher, it's free, it's better for the environment because you're not wasting electricity, and I think it makes your clothes last longer (although they can get sun faded).

Air dried clothes always feel stiff and scratchy to me. I currently air dry, but I much prefer having a dryer.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



d3c0y2 posted:

You're aware that nearly every western nation has gas infrastructure, room for dryers and you still see a lot of hanging clothes out to dry.

Before I came away to University i'd never even used a dryer, back at the family home we always hung the clothes out in the back garden most days, or on the radiators if it was poo poo outside.

Western Europe? I don't have any stats handy but there's a reason everyone has those awful solid range burners instead of gas.

I've spent a fair amount of time in a fair amount of countries, mostly in Europe, and gas infrastructure is almost non-existent. I could be wrong about the average, but I can't find any simple stats or maps in a cursory google search.

edit: It's pretty obvious if you spent 100% of your early life air drying that you would prefer it, as is the opposite case for me.

sleepy gary has a new favorite as of 13:23 on Nov 18, 2012

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Pocket Billiards posted:

Maybe I'm daft, I didn't grow up in a place with natural gas supply, but I am living in one now. What the hell does 'natural gas infrastructure' have to do with drying your clothes? The gas only seems to be used for stoves, oven and hot water systems.

Because natural gas is a far cheaper source of heat energy to dry clothes. In the US, in places where natural gas is available (almost eveywhere), nobody in their right mind would choose an electric dryer.

The unpopularity of gas (my claim) in Europe leads to the almost complete lack of availability of gas dryers, which is why you can't comprehend that gas can be used for more than heating water and food.

For what it's worth, I looked at an apartment recently that was in a rare spot of the city (central europe) that has natural gas lines. Even there, they had electric dryers in the community laundry room.

sleepy gary has a new favorite as of 14:23 on Nov 18, 2012

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Mister Kingdom posted:

I bought my first computer (Leading Edge Model D) in 1988. It had two 5.25" floppy drives because I couldn't afford the 10Mb HD at $500.

I have a Leading Edge Model D.

edit: Also two floppies and no HDD.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Base Emitter posted:

So, anybody can lock you out of your car.

I'm sure it does not stop responding forever.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



holy poo poo that's quite an avtext gromit

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Killer robot posted:

On the second, it was interesting that way. That mentioned separate cord on the IDE drive was just an analog audio out that filtered through the sound card anyway. Playing CD audio like Redbook, the CD-ROM functioned just as an audio CD player rather than something delivering digital data at all.

Early CDROM drives were not even capable of encoding redbook audio as a digital stream over ATA.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Astroman posted:

Around the same time I found this badass pocket tv on clearance for like $20 at Caldor:

Backlit by the power of THE SUN (ie you had to shine a light at the back and watch it through a mirror) you could glimpse a very pixillated black and white tv image, but godammit, TV in my pocket! Some rear end in a top hat kid I went to school with swiped it from me when I slept over at his house right before I moved. If you're reading this, gently caress you.

I have one of these, along with the detachable electroluminescent backlight accessory.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Lowen SoDium posted:

That would be the Video Painter:



My sister and I had one of these growing up. We played the poo poo out of it.

I remember the commercials for this thing. I wanted it so badly but I never got one.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Fuzz1111 posted:

I did this with a portable 2" CRT black and white TV and an original atari 2600 (the one with wood panelling and 6 switches). Only long enough to prove that it could work mind you as the TV took no less than 12 D size cells and ate through them fast.

I tried to find a picture of the TV but I can't remember the brand or model and infact I can't even find many of similar form factor (kinda like an oscilloscope).

http://uv201.com/TV_Pages/panasonic_tr001.htm this is the closest thing I can think of with such a small CRT and not as portable as a Sony Watchman.

Maybe this http://www.guenthoer.de/doku/werbun...v1-bradshaw.jpg

Anything from here: http://www.guenthoer.de/e-history.htm ?

What happened to it?

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



You Are A Elf posted:

I remember an ad for something like this TV in an old National Geographic from 1980. I even remember it was some dude in a leather chair making GBS threads himself because a pirate on TV had a parrot that had flown off the screen into the man's living room implying the TV produced "life-like pictures that will look like they're in the room with you!" And the pirate on TV is all like

I've seen those color mirror projection TVs in action and they are quite sharp in the image department, but the ones I remember were giant console furniture TVs with plastic screens. You know, those '80s rear projection screens that aimed at the plastic screen and made crude images. I always thought (even as a kid) that they blew rear end and had terrible pictures. These things:



You had to be front and center and not a millimeter off from the exact dead center of the screen to see anything, because otherwise all you were going to see was black moving things if you were off to the side. They had a really dark and dim picture, and I remember you couldn't leave a VCR or video game on pause for more than a minute because the fear was that it would damage the bulbs and screen with burn-in. My friend had one when I was a kid, and he insisted that BIGGER = BETTER when it came to playing NES on it. Okay, so at the time I had this 19" Zenith TV from the early 70s that I had to hook the RF modulator to with one of these:



That is ubiquitous with 1970s and earlier TV sets and the then recent 1980s technology, and man, that TV had an awesome picture when playing NES on it. So what I was seeing on my old rear end TV with my NES looked like this:



Looked like this on my friend's 46" piece of poo poo TV with the same game:



gently caress my childhood friend, and gently caress those old school big screen projection TVs. I mean, the technology did get better because the early 2000s HDTVs with the same technology look mighty fine, but the early technology just sucked really bad and didn't account for BIGGER = BETTER at all.

OK I tried to not to sperg out after TomorrowComesToday's post but now I can't help it anymore.

First of all, those oldschool front- and rear-projection televisions use three small (5-10 inch) CRTs - one each of red, blue, and green - that run at extremely high brightness levels (relatively) to make the image. Not "bulbs." Sorry, I know that's pedantic. But yes, they were extremely susceptible to burn-in because of the high intensity that was required to throw enough light to make a passable image. Some of them were actually liquid-cooled.

Second, The rear-projection HDTVs of the early 2000s did NOT use the same technology - not even close. They used one of DLP or LCoS or LCDs to form the images and white light from a small metal halide lamp for illumination.

Finally, TomorrowComesToday, it's really too bad you don't still have some of that stuff still. What happened to it? Some of it would be worth a decent amount to collectors today.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



You Are A Elf posted:

I'm sorry, I grew up poor and didn't see many big-screen TVs or even an HDTV until I was given my first 720p HDTV in 2006. Until then, I was using used CRTs. I have virtually no idea about the inner workings of large projection TVs, but I really meant the burn-in happened, not that it was a myth. People would just yell at you "DON'T PAUSE IT TOO LONG OR YOU'LL BURN THE IMAGE IN! " all the time, so you listened. I used to take apart old broken CRTs as a kid and found the inner workings fascinating since there were these Radio Shack comics I used to collect and read about how electronics work. Oh, and those comics were and are still boss.

By all means sperg away if someone's incorrect, but it's not really so much pendantic as it is condescending when you put "bulbs" in parentheses. Just say it didn't use bulbs to correct me instead of "'bulbs', heh " When you're a small kid and only see a projection TV like the ones I'm talking about maybe twice in your short childhood life, then try to remember back to how they worked, those miniature CRT screens sure do look like a red, green, and blue stage light vv

I didn't grow up poor but we never had any bigscreen tvs, and my first "hdtv" was a store brand (dynex) 720p 32" affair that I got as a hand-me-down in 2011 or so. I sold it when I moved and I still haven't had anything better.

I'm sorry you were offended by my use of punctuation, but it was appropriate in context and I even apologized for being pedantic about it. What more can I do?


Qotile Swirl posted:

Maybe they weren't the most common type, I don't know, but CRT rear-projection HDTVs certainly did exist in that time period. My mother has one and still uses it. Bought it in 2002, I think.

I don't believe this at all. If I am wrong, I would really appreciate being set right (model information, etc) because I am always willing to learn. I've never heard of such a thing though.


Johnny Aztec posted:

I saw an example of something posted in this thread waay back. I was out at a flea market and saw a stack of something in the corner. Seemed like I had seen them before. Found me a stack of Video-discs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Videodisc Essentially movies on vinyl, read with a needle in a plastic shell. Neat to find,never seen any in the wild before but essentially worthless. Even Star wars is only like 10 bucks on Ebay, and these were like 9 to 5, Gladiator, Heaven can wait, and some other forgettable 70's movies.

"Videodisc" (whoops I'm using quotes again; please don't get offended) is a generic term. Based on your description, you're talking about CEDs, which use a stylus to form an RC circuit with the disc to reproduce the recorded signal. It was a whacky system that never gained widespread adoption. The discs and players are gaining value in collector circles.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006




Haha, this is amazing. Thank you.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Qotile Swirl posted:

I think this is the one my mom has. It's a beast of a thing, but the picture is very nice so long as you're sitting directly in front of it and the room isn't too bright. I think the difficulty posed by getting it out of the house is a large part of the reason why she still has it.

This is really fantastic. I read that whole review and they seem quite impressed by it and it has a lot of cutting-edge features for the time. I would have lost money in a bet that such a thing existed, but now I know better.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Well, ok, how about this for obsolete technology: Telephone Calls.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Jerry Cotton posted:

^^^ What he said

The only things that could replace phone calls are video phone calls (nope) and meeting in person. And since the telephone was basically invented to facilitate real-time voice communication in instances where meeting face-to-face was not feasible, welp...

If you think instant messaging, text chat, or e-mail serves the same purpose as voice communications then I don't know what to tell you.

It was kind of tongue-in-cheek. Voice calling isn't going to disappear but I guarantee you people are using voice calls less and less.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



I can't even believe the razor thing is real. I've SEEN those slots in medicine cabinets before but I never scrutinized them. They just drop into the loving walls? What kind of person thinks that is an ok solution to anything?

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sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Killer robot posted:

It's going into a relatively sealed compartment in the wall, razor blades don't rot or anything, and it would take many years of accumulation to fill the space. On the flip side, it means there's no need to put razors in the trash where they might cut people/bags/pets, and no need for a separate razor blade only trash dispenser that is either tiny or takes years to fill. A better question is, what kind of person has a genuine, rather than "this feels kinda counterintuitive", objection?

People have been known to justify the use of piss bottles in their bedrooms, so this attitude doesn't surprise me. Feel free to fill up your walls with refuse all you want.

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