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dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

Beautiful home! So nice to see a lot of historic detail being saved and restored. Im rehabbing a 1919 bungalow and stripped all the original painted woodwork. It is a tremendous amount of work; a lot more than I anticipated and not sure if I'd make the same decision again. It is beautiful though

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dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

I just went through the same kitchen flooring dilemma in my 1919, looked exactly the same. Kitchens and bathroom floors were often left as painted wood. The adhesive is what's called cutback and besides being very difficult/impossible to remove, it most likely contains asbestos. So, it's best left be. I put down Hardibacker and tiled mine.

Thanks for the update, lookin good

dwoloz fucked around with this message at Sep 15, 2012 around 01:35

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

SCORE! Fantastic deal on the sink. We have a fancy salvage yard near us and those sinks usually go or $200-300



As an aside, after just stripping almost an entire house's woodwork of paint, my advice....don't. It is unbelievably time consuming and messy. There are many methods of removal (infrared, chemical, heat gun, mechanical) but they all suck. I felt like chemical sucked the least though. If you are determined (which I have a feeling you are), I'm happy to lend my tips if you like

dwoloz fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2012 around 21:21

dwoloz
Oct 20, 2004

Uh uh fool, step back

Blistex posted:

Aluminum windows were a cheap fad after the war. The aluminum industry needed to keep the demand high, and since they were no longer manufacturing thousands of warplanes a month, they tried to get these abominations to take off. (along with lots of other ideas like aluminum pans, siding, ladders, etc.)

They finally died off (for the most part) in the 70's (I think) and now you really only see them on older buildings that haven't been renovated yet. Most of these windows were really cheap sliders that froze in the winter, caused frost to build up inside them, and if you were not careful, would rip the skin off your fingers. They typically had horrible insulation qualities and unless doubled up with an additional one on the inside would cause everything within three feet of them to be colder. They were basically heatsinks that bled your energy bill out into the cold.

They are not ideal for northern climates, and have all but been replaced by vinyl.

But hey, they never rot! (sigh, my house has several of these pieces of poo poo, they are abysmal)

There are also modern very nice windows that have an aluminum clad exterior that won't rot and don't need to be painted

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