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FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


therattle posted:

Ah, I've been wanting to make focaccia with durum 00 wheat; fine grind, high protein. I love the idea of using steeped oil in it.

Do any of you sift your flour for bread? I do for other baking, but not bread baking.

I have done it in the past because I assumed I was supposed to but it didn't seem to make much of a difference so I stopped.

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D-Rider
Dec 18, 2009


So I made some honey wheat bread.



It's the first bread I've baked since I finished culinary school. We don't bake fresh bread at my workplace, so I'm way out of practice.

This successful loaf has inspired me to start baking again, so I have a question about something I am not very familiar with: sourdough starters. I've used the raisin water method mentioned earlier in this thread and I'm at the point where you first mix in an equal weight of flour with the raisin water that's been sitting out for a few days. Do I need to let this mix sit out for a while and ferment or do I need to toss it in the fridge?

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


FishBulb posted:

I have done it in the past because I assumed I was supposed to but it didn't seem to make much of a difference so I stopped.

Well - you can sift flour for really fine bread - but it is not really something that I think is worth doing

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

Happy Hat posted:

Well - you can sift flour for really fine bread - but it is not really something that I think is worth doing

It's actually been found in some recipes to hamper air pocket development. But generally, you're spot on it's just a waste of time. As you've written about earlier in the thread, bread's about gluten and its stretch, not how evenly distributed the flower is initially.

This kind of thing is far more important in a sponge cake, where you want light, fluffy, consistent sponge. (but then you never to knead a sponge cake)

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Sourdough questions...

I love the Rosemary Olive Oil bread that Whole Foods sells. I don't like paying 4 bucks a loaf for it.

I sent out for the Oregon Trail starter found here and received it the other day. Going through the brochure, I currently have it sitting in the oven "for up to 48 hours" covered with a damp towel. Unfortunately, my oven doesn't have a light on it, and it's about 70 in the house, so I'm guessing that will have to do.

1) How long do I let it sit there before going to step 3, which is mixing in water/flour/and some potato water? All the instructions say are up to 48 hours...

2) wtf is potato water? Should I just buy a potato, cut it up, boil it in water, and use the leftover water?

3) After I've done this and it's refrigerated, I should be good to go...just before I plan on using it add some more flour and water and let it sit over night so I don't use all my starter up, right?

Finally, anyone have a good rosemary olive oil soudough recipe?

by.a.teammate
Jun 27, 2007
theres nothing wrong with the word panties

Help!

I made some white bread at it turned out great so I thought I'd make some dough in the evening and then cook it in the morning. Problem is now its far too yeasty! It`s like it`s being cooked in vodka, it`s not really edible sadly. Is there anything I can do to stop this happening and still have dough ready in the morning to bake?

Thanks!

hyper from Pixie Sticks
Sep 28, 2004



When you're proofing the dough, do so overnight in the fridge. That'll slow down the yeast and maybe make it taste less yeasty.

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

nwin posted:

Sourdough questions...

I love the Rosemary Olive Oil bread that Whole Foods sells. I don't like paying 4 bucks a loaf for it.

I sent out for the Oregon Trail starter found here and received it the other day. Going through the brochure, I currently have it sitting in the oven "for up to 48 hours" covered with a damp towel. Unfortunately, my oven doesn't have a light on it, and it's about 70 in the house, so I'm guessing that will have to do.

1) How long do I let it sit there before going to step 3, which is mixing in water/flour/and some potato water? All the instructions say are up to 48 hours...

2) wtf is potato water? Should I just buy a potato, cut it up, boil it in water, and use the leftover water?

3) After I've done this and it's refrigerated, I should be good to go...just before I plan on using it add some more flour and water and let it sit over night so I don't use all my starter up, right?

Finally, anyone have a good rosemary olive oil soudough recipe?

1) As long as you can manage, no longer than 48 hours. You'll enjoy better results if you take it out 3 or 4 times over the period, deflate the dough by pressing it flat/poking into it with you fingers, until its flat, re-forming it into a tight round, and replacing it.

2) It's exactly what you think it is. Though check your quantities, I can't imagine you'd want much, I've never used potato water in sour dough, but I imagine it's for increased starch.

3) You should only use about one ladle full of starter if its active for the whole recipe. You should add starter and flour/water in the requisite quantities, with 1 ladle of starter, the night before you intend to bake. Any longer and the tangy/sour taste will be overpowering.

Hope this helps!

by.a.teammate posted:

Help!

I made some white bread at it turned out great so I thought I'd make some dough in the evening and then cook it in the morning. Problem is now its far too yeasty! It`s like it`s being cooked in vodka, it`s not really edible sadly. Is there anything I can do to stop this happening and still have dough ready in the morning to bake?

Thanks!

There are couple of options, as has already been suggested, prove the dough in the fridge overnight, then do the final shape/prove on the baking morning. This will retard the development of the yeast in the dough and dramatically slow its production, you'll only need a final prove the next day. DO ensure that you knead thoroughly though, and wrap in cling film tightly. The cooling from the refrigerator can add moisture, which is good, but will make the dough difficult to work with the next day, more importantly, when you remove it from the fridge, don't over compensate for the wet dough with flour, or you'll end up with an inch thick indestructible crust.

Alternatively, what you can do, is use less yeast, it'll take some experimentation, but effectively what is happening is you introduce a yeast culture to the dough, which releases oxygen and other gasses as it feeds, which is how you get air in your bread. You're leaving it overnight, and the yeast is a living organism feeding on your dough. Its feeding too much, and the yeast culture is multiplying constantly, so by the morning, you have too much yeast. The solution? Introduce less yeast in the dough, and leave overnight. I'd suggest half for the night before for a mid-morning bake, or a third for up to 24 hours before, but it varies greatly based on the kind of yeast you're using. See the OP for more help around yeast types.

Bob_McBob
Mar 24, 2007




I rarely get the opportunity to bake bread, but I banged out some dinner rolls last night. Pretty tasty.

coop52
May 10, 2009


I tried baking my first loaf today, using this recipe http://chickensintheroad.com/cooking/grandmother-bread/ , and it didn't turn out very well.



I mixed the dough, kneaded it until it was smooth, and let it rise for an hour and a half or so. I shaped the dough and put it in a Pyrex dish (don't have a loaf pan or stone or anything) and put it in the oven on 180C for 20 minutes. My oven isn't a real oven; it's a microwave/convection oven combo. The top crust turned out really nice, but the bottom was still really runny, so I flipped it over and put it back in for another 10 minutes on 180C. I let it cool on a rack for 45 minutes before I cut it.


What do you think went wrong?

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Longer rise and better oven. Or at least better oven. It's undercooked.

WhoIsYou
Jan 28, 2009


coop52 posted:

I mixed the dough, kneaded it until it was smooth, and let it rise for an hour and a half or so. I shaped the dough and put it in a Pyrex dish (don't have a loaf pan or stone or anything) and put it in the oven on 180C for 20 minutes. My oven isn't a real oven; it's a microwave/convection oven combo. The top crust turned out really nice, but the bottom was still really runny, so I flipped it over and put it back in for another 10 minutes on 180C. I let it cool on a rack for 45 minutes before I cut it.


What do you think went wrong?

You didn't give it a second fermentation. You need to let it rise twice - the first time develops the flavor, the second is for size and lightness. After you shape it, cover it with plastic and let it rise again until it's about %90 bigger than it started.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


coop52 posted:

I tried baking my first loaf today, using this recipe http://chickensintheroad.com/cooking/grandmother-bread/ , and it didn't turn out very well.



I mixed the dough, kneaded it until it was smooth, and let it rise for an hour and a half or so. I shaped the dough and put it in a Pyrex dish (don't have a loaf pan or stone or anything) and put it in the oven on 180C for 20 minutes. My oven isn't a real oven; it's a microwave/convection oven combo. The top crust turned out really nice, but the bottom was still really runny, so I flipped it over and put it back in for another 10 minutes on 180C. I let it cool on a rack for 45 minutes before I cut it.


What do you think went wrong?

Your oven sucks!

Also - did you just deflate it, and then straight in the oven it went?

Also - temperature - 180 is too low, 200 is better 220 even more so.

Also - time - with that temperature you should probably be looking at something like 40 minutes..

Uxzuigal
Jan 16, 2013

Chill Berserker Dude


A tiny trick when baking with spelt: Try adding orange juice to help the yeast, a spoonful or so. Also, adding 1 DL of Honey to a "standard" 2 bread dough makes for amazing spelt breads.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Uxzuigal posted:

A tiny trick when baking with spelt: Try adding orange juice to help the yeast, a spoonful or so. Also, adding 1 DL of Honey to a "standard" 2 bread dough makes for amazing spelt breads.

Thanks. Would this be for a 100% spelt loaf? I often use approx 30% white spelt to white wheat; it's my favourite flour to add to the basic recipe. Haven't noticed a massive impact on the rise from using that amount of spelt. Never actually tried a 100% spelt loaf before but I should.

Uxzuigal
Jan 16, 2013

Chill Berserker Dude


therattle posted:

Thanks. Would this be for a 100% spelt loaf? I often use approx 30% white spelt to white wheat; it's my favourite flour to add to the basic recipe. Haven't noticed a massive impact on the rise from using that amount of spelt. Never actually tried a 100% spelt loaf before but I should.

Usualy I mix around 25% rye (or white wheat if you want it abit "lighter"), 50% white spelt, 25% whole spelt for my bread loaf's. And add the Honey for some epicness

coop52
May 10, 2009


Can't really do anything about the oven. I live in a tiny, one room apartment, and that's all that'll fit. I'll let it rise longer next time. This time I let it sit there about 45 minutes.

Uxzuigal
Jan 16, 2013

Chill Berserker Dude


coop52 posted:

Can't really do anything about the oven. I live in a tiny, one room apartment, and that's all that'll fit. I'll let it rise longer next time. This time I let it sit there about 45 minutes.

You can get tiny ovens at even 45cm width here (where as 60cm is usualy the standard, atleast here in Europe). Sure that wont fit? A good oven is a must, chef or not :P

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

coop52 posted:

Can't really do anything about the oven. I live in a tiny, one room apartment, and that's all that'll fit. I'll let it rise longer next time. This time I let it sit there about 45 minutes.

If your oven only heats from above, it's going to be very difficult to get your bread to bake evenly.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


axolotl farmer posted:

If your oven only heats from above, it's going to be very difficult to get your bread to bake evenly.

Hmm - unless there's a chicken spit...

That would actually be an interesting thing to try out at home..

Spit roasted bread - in the oven!

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Happy Hat posted:

Hmm - unless there's a chicken spit...

That would actually be an interesting thing to try out at home..

Spit roasted bread - in the oven!

Good luck shaping that!

KWC
Jul 5, 2007
Hello

coop52 posted:

Can't really do anything about the oven. I live in a tiny, one room apartment, and that's all that'll fit. I'll let it rise longer next time. This time I let it sit there about 45 minutes.

Also from your original post I think you mentioned a pyrex dish. Try a flat pan like a baking sheet. The air (and therefore heat) will circulate better around the bottom of the loaf.

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

therattle posted:

Good luck shaping that!

80% hydration spit roasted baguettes.

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

therattle posted:

Good luck shaping that!

Surely it'd be no worse than the kind of bread automatic bread-makers spit out? Has anyone had a bread maker that actually did a good job at turning out bread of varying sorts? Most I've come across are pretty poor.

pim01
Oct 22, 2002



Monkahchi posted:

Surely it'd be no worse than the kind of bread automatic bread-makers spit out? Has anyone had a bread maker that actually did a good job at turning out bread of varying sorts? Most I've come across are pretty poor.

Our Panasonic one is actually pretty decent for a bread-maker - not as good as properly made bread of course, but for the amount of effort expanded (chuck stuff in in the right order, press button) I can't really knock it.

The in-laws actually use theirs to do the proof and kneading steps, but then use the normal oven to do the actual baking - they say it gives a better result (and I don't see why it wouldn't) but for me that nudges the amount of effort over the edge where I'd rather go for hand-made bread.

coop52
May 10, 2009


Uxzuigal posted:

You can get tiny ovens at even 45cm width here (where as 60cm is usualy the standard, atleast here in Europe). Sure that wont fit? A good oven is a must, chef or not :P

Not in glorious Nippon. Real ovens are pretty rare and take up lots of counter space, which I also don't have.


I do have a flat baking sheet. I'll use that next time.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Monkahchi posted:

Surely it'd be no worse than the kind of bread automatic bread-makers spit out? Has anyone had a bread maker that actually did a good job at turning out bread of varying sorts? Most I've come across are pretty poor.

To me bread makers make bread that is a slightly superior and fresh version of supermarket bread (which is not what I wanted for home made bread). It isn't down to bread makers per se, but rather that bread makers do not really allow for a long fermentation, which is where flavour and texture develop. The only time I've used mine in the past year is to make brioche for a bread and butter pudding.

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


therattle posted:

It isn't down to bread makers per se, but rather that bread makers do not really allow for a long fermentation, which is where flavour and texture develop.

You can still do a preferment and dump it into the bread machine with the remaining ingredients. I've done that when I want more flavor but have a hankering for a lazy loaf of bread with a butt hole. Or two butt holes if you're using a larger machine.

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

Molten Llama posted:

You can still do a preferment and dump it into the bread machine with the remaining ingredients. I've done that when I want more flavor but have a hankering for a lazy loaf of bread with a butt hole. Or two butt holes if you're using a larger machine.

I think this comes down to what someone else was saying above, that at a certain point you tip over the amount of effort involved, to a point where you feel as if you may as well make the bread by hand. Sounds like that's your take too. I just don't enjoy bread-maker bread, but I'll keep trying, I'm happy to be proven wrong.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



I got politely re-directed here from the General Questions thread! Does anyone have a good/recommended recipe for making your own loaf of bread? We're hoping to get into the habit of making our own instead of buying the stuff at the supermarket. Also- what kind of bread pan is best to use?

Uxzuigal
Jan 16, 2013

Chill Berserker Dude


melon cat posted:

I got politely re-directed here from the General Questions thread! Does anyone have a good/recommended recipe for making your own loaf of bread? We're hoping to get into the habit of making our own instead of buying the stuff at the supermarket. Also- what kind of bread pan is best to use?

I can only recommend what I use myself: 25% rye (or white wheat if you want it abit "lighter"), 50% white spelt, 25% whole spelt for my bread loaf's. And add the Honey if you want it even better.

As far as pans go.. aluminum works well, but if you get your hands on stone pans (hard to get, also hard to bake in) it adds an epic twist to the bread.


(Strongly recommend pre-heating the stone pans if you chose to use that) Also, always preheat oven.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

melon cat posted:

I got politely re-directed here from the General Questions thread! Does anyone have a good/recommended recipe for making your own loaf of bread? We're hoping to get into the habit of making our own instead of buying the stuff at the supermarket. Also- what kind of bread pan is best to use?

There's usually a recipe for basic bread right on the bag of flour. They're very basic and very reliable recipes.

You only need a bread pan if you want bread that's shaped like toast. Non-stick pans are nice and reliable for making that kind of bread.

For making regular loaves, just use a standard sheet pan and parchment paper.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

melon cat posted:

I got politely re-directed here from the General Questions thread! Does anyone have a good/recommended recipe for making your own loaf of bread? We're hoping to get into the habit of making our own instead of buying the stuff at the supermarket. Also- what kind of bread pan is best to use?

Did you read the OP? If not, do! There is a link to the no-knead bread thread, which I think is a fantastic bread, delicious, and relatively low effort.

The Candyman
Aug 19, 2010

by T. Finninho


My parents bought me Bread by Nick Malgieri. It has an amazing recipe for Golden Sandwich Bread. Does anyone else have experience with the book and the quality of the recipes?


Edit: Also, sad stories about people the author knew who worked in the twin towers.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


My wife bought me a Pullman loaf pan for Christmas and its kinda nifty. It has a lid that slides onto it and bakes essentially square loaves with a very soft crust so its great for sandwhich loaf (which having school aged kids i go through a lot of) It's kinda an odd size so my old loaf recipes don't really "fill" it properly so I've been using the ones that came with the pan with good results but I'm not sure how to make potato bread or sourdough with it. Anyone have any suggestions or experience with this thing?

Not that I mind just experimenting myself until I figure it out.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

FishBulb posted:

My wife bought me a Pullman loaf pan for Christmas and its kinda nifty. It has a lid that slides onto it and bakes essentially square loaves with a very soft crust so its great for sandwhich loaf (which having school aged kids i go through a lot of) It's kinda an odd size so my old loaf recipes don't really "fill" it properly so I've been using the ones that came with the pan with good results but I'm not sure how to make potato bread or sourdough with it. Anyone have any suggestions or e experience with this thing?

Not that I mind just experimenting myself until I figure it out.

Can't you just scale up the volume of your doughs to fill it? Measure respective tin volumes using water.

ded
Oct 27, 2005

Kooler than Jesus

I am truly lazy and use a Zojirushi BBCCX20 Home Bakery Supreme Bread Machine. It makes good bread with minimal effort.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



therattle posted:

Did you read the OP? If not, do! There is a link to the no-knead bread thread, which I think is a fantastic bread, delicious, and relatively low effort.
I saw that, but the crust for the no-knead dough looks to be quite thick and crispy (which is awesome on its own). However, I'm looking for a bread recipe that yields a soft, squishy, thinner crust can be used for things like french toast.

But of course- let me know if my first impressions of the no-knead recipe are wrong.

\/

melon cat fucked around with this message at Jan 25, 2013 around 06:06

ambient oatmeal
Jun 23, 2012



melon cat posted:

I saw that, but the crust for the no-knead dough looks to be quite thick and crispy (which is awesome on its own). However, I'm looking for a bread recipe that yields a soft, squishy, thinner crust can be used for things like french toast.

But of course- let me know if my first impressions of the no-knead recipe are wrong.

I've made the recipe that the Doctor posted on page 3 a good number of times, and its came out pretty well each time. It's replaced my store bought sandwich loaf, and makes a great french toast.

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TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

You will never in your entire life find a better bread for French Toast than challah which is much easier to make than it might appear to be at first.

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