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Aaronicon
Oct 2, 2010

by primus


I think there's something wrong with my sourdough mother. It smells sour but not bad sour, it's nice and frothy on top - but it's not rising. I fed it for 5 days and the last day I was supposed to leave it to 'double and collapse' - but it never happened. It got bubbly on top, smelt strongly like apples and cheese, but it didn't rise a single bit inside the container. Is that normal? Is it a bung mother? It's in the fridge right now before I'm supposed to use for the first time in a couple of days. I'm just worried that there's yeast in there, sure, but not enough to actually do anything but bubble...

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therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Foam Monkey posted:

Thanks to this thread I made a thing.

It's an Asiago cheese Ciabatta following the recipe in the Bread Baker's Apprentice. This is the first time I've ever tried to make bread outside of a bread making machine before, and I had never even heard of poolish before this. So I wanted to thank all of you for showing me that it is possible to make my own bread, even if it is the fancy rustic style I like to buy so much.

That's brilliant, thanks for posting. How did it taste?

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

US Foreign Policy posted:

While my sourdough starter chugs along, I figured I'd make a basic no-knead white bread loaf. Flour, water, salt, yeast. I am pleased with this, though ignore the instagram filter.




my first bready baby. It was life changing.

Can you turn off the 80s photo filter? It makes the bread look blood red. Which I don't think it's supposed to.

TenKindsOfCrazy
Aug 11, 2010

Tell me a story with my pudding and tea.


Foam Monkey posted:

Thanks to this thread I made a thing.

It's an Asiago cheese Ciabatta following the recipe in the Bread Baker's Apprentice. This is the first time I've ever tried to make bread outside of a bread making machine before, and I had never even heard of poolish before this. So I wanted to thank all of you for showing me that it is possible to make my own bread, even if it is the fancy rustic style I like to buy so much.

I haven't made anything yet that requires a poolish. Isn't it so much better eating a fancy bread you made yourself? I hate buying bread now.

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

TenKindsOfCrazy posted:

Well, The Doctor, here it is! Look my bread:

The batter bread with the addition of cocoa and hazelnuts. Chocolate Hazelnut Batter Bread:



Hazelnut Bread. It looks like Sonic The Hedgehog but drat if this isn't the tastiest bread I've ever made:



Chocolate Hazelnut crumb:



Ooooh, that crumb:



Sorry for the wonky colours in the last couple. Nighttime in my mom's kitchen.

Seriously, the regular hazelnut bread is to fricking die for. SO nutty and SO flavourful. This recipe and I used the soaking water for both loaves of bread actually since I soaked way more nuts than was called for and so had lots more water to use. I don't have a crumb shot for the white hazelnut bread since I cut it when it was still warm and the crumb was ugly. Next time I might chop the hazelnuts up because the whole hazelnuts give a kind of intense nut experience.

The chocolate bread has a definite taste of cocoa in the crust which I don't like much but the inner crumb is mild and delicious. Super soft and less cake-like than the white batter bread which I attribute to using the hazelnut water instead of milk. I did add a little milk when I needed more moisture in the batter but not a lot.

This is awesome, I want that chocolate bread so much. Hazelnut is my favourite nut to have in everything - cake, chocolate, pastry, all things in life worth dying for can be enhanced with hazelnuts.

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

Also, I woke up my starter yesterday, it's been sitting in the fridge for...a long time. I fed it last night but it doesn't seem to be quite awake yet. I have a tendency to leave it in the fridge for ages without feeding it but it always seems to recover. The first picture here is the layer of hooch which was on top when I took it out, I poured that off and, as usual, underneath the top layer is the healthy happy starter.



Foam Monkey
Jun 4, 2007
Lurkzilla

Grimey Drawer

therattle posted:

That's brilliant, thanks for posting. How did it taste?

TenKindsOfCrazy posted:

I haven't made anything yet that requires a poolish. Isn't it so much better eating a fancy bread you made yourself? I hate buying bread now.

Here's a slice shot.

I regret nothing from making this bread. It's not quite right with the holey middle (don't know how to describe it otherwise), but it tastes amazing. With the poolish all I can say is that it does add something to the bread flavor wise, it's kinda hard to put the finger on it, but I am very happy that I made a tasty bread. But I must still achieve the airy holey middle I seek (ie. the airy style of the baguette.)

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Foam Monkey posted:

Here's a slice shot.

I regret nothing from making this bread. It's not quite right with the holey middle (don't know how to describe it otherwise), but it tastes amazing. With the poolish all I can say is that it does add something to the bread flavor wise, it's kinda hard to put the finger on it, but I am very happy that I made a tasty bread. But I must still achieve the airy holey middle I seek (ie. the airy style of the baguette.)

Higher hydration leads to a looser crumb. Try more water. It makes the dough harder to work but it'll do the trick.

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib



he is awake

I transferred my starter to another container since the other one was getting pretty gross and I didn't trust it not to grow mould on the counter top. Sourdough tomorrow!

I think this starter is close to five months old.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXGxyEOQdUg

Kagrenak
Sep 8, 2010


Made croissants the other day, they came out pretty great (not actually this yellow, terrible cell phone camera). Flaky and buttery but not greasy. I did 243 layers of lamination for these. Don't have any crumb shots because I forgot to do that before people ate them all.

TenKindsOfCrazy
Aug 11, 2010

Tell me a story with my pudding and tea.


I actually made this for the Snacks Of Shame thread but it involved bread baking so here are my buns! Someone in that thread mentioned the Hocus Pocus Buns that their grandma used to make and I thought they sounded delicious. I used my favourite eggless challah recipe for the bread and more or less followed this recipe as a guideline to putting it all together.





These are pretty tasty!

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

Just put together the starter for these no knead soft sourdough rolls from the weekend bakery. That will hang out in my fridge overnight and chill on my counter top for about 12 hours tomorrow. My boyfriend is on a mission to get me honey, yogurt and butter.

http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/...ourdough-rolls/

Also making this "levain", except mine will be all whole wheat.

http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/...at-levain-loaf/

This is a cool link with some info on what a "levain" is...the internet seems to be telling me that my starters are all technically "desem", since sourdough is rye, levain is white flour, and desem is wholewheat flour. After tonight I will be phasing half my "desem" into sourdough since I'm going to feed it rye, but I will keep my desem (whole wheat starter) as well.

Nicol Bolas
Feb 13, 2009


YOU GUYS, I MADE A BREAD AND IT HAS HOLES AND ISN'T TOO DENSE AND THE INSIDE IS ALL SPONGY AND THE CRUST IS CRISPY AND AWESOME and I think I ate half the loaf in my excitement?

I followed the Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a day mother recipe, subbing in half of white whole wheat flour, fridging it for two days. The dough was SUPER sloppy and wet, but I had faith and let it rise for about 90 minutes and then baked on parchment in my lidded dutch oven. I pulled the lid off at half an hour and then let it bake for another 15 to get the crust awesome.

It ain't no braided challah, but I'm pretty pleased--it's lightyears better than every other bread I've ever made. Thank you so, so much, thread. I couldn't have done this without you.

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



I made a change and now my bread isn't working right

I've been using a generic 50/50 wheat bread recipe for a while. It works great, I do flatbreads and pizza shells and its workable and everything. I got some sourdough starter from a friend, and on her suggestion, made a 100% hydration white preferment with about an 1/8 cup of starter and let it go overnight. Then I mix in the wheat flour, knead, and bake as usual. Since I started with the preferment, the gluten development has gone to poo poo. Even when I knead for twice as long (by hand), I still can't get anywhere near enough stretch to make a pizza crust by hand without it becoming really holey.

This is my first time with sourdough. Any suggestions?

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

Happiness Commando posted:

I made a change and now my bread isn't working right

I've been using a generic 50/50 wheat bread recipe for a while. It works great, I do flatbreads and pizza shells and its workable and everything. I got some sourdough starter from a friend, and on her suggestion, made a 100% hydration white preferment with about an 1/8 cup of starter and let it go overnight. Then I mix in the wheat flour, knead, and bake as usual. Since I started with the preferment, the gluten development has gone to poo poo. Even when I knead for twice as long (by hand), I still can't get anywhere near enough stretch to make a pizza crust by hand without it becoming really holey.

This is my first time with sourdough. Any suggestions?

Have you been feeding it right? Does it smell a bit acetone-y?
I'd say get the starter on a good feeding schedule over the course of a week (a few days?) and then use it, be sure to let it at room-ish temperature for the last half day.

Maybe also let the dough rest once you have balled it up in the fridge for a day or two.

http://www.boomtownrap.com/885/sour...ven-pizzas-get/
I've followed that recipe with my brother a few times and it's come out pretty drat well. It's even come out well when I've upped the preferment to 20 or so percent, instead of the table-listed 10%.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Nov 4, 2013 around 05:33

TenKindsOfCrazy
Aug 11, 2010

Tell me a story with my pudding and tea.


Nicol Bolas posted:

YOU GUYS, I MADE A BREAD AND IT HAS HOLES AND ISN'T TOO DENSE AND THE INSIDE IS ALL SPONGY AND THE CRUST IS CRISPY AND AWESOME and I think I ate half the loaf in my excitement?

I followed the Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a day mother recipe, subbing in half of white whole wheat flour, fridging it for two days. The dough was SUPER sloppy and wet, but I had faith and let it rise for about 90 minutes and then baked on parchment in my lidded dutch oven. I pulled the lid off at half an hour and then let it bake for another 15 to get the crust awesome.

It ain't no braided challah, but I'm pretty pleased--it's lightyears better than every other bread I've ever made. Thank you so, so much, thread. I couldn't have done this without you.

Bread excitement gets me all excited! I'm going to have to search out some of that Artisan Bread in 5 stuff. I went to the the site and the first post was about stovetop english muffins and now I have to try those.

Dorrthrax
Feb 2, 2013


After a year or two on a ketotic diet, I have changed jobs and have rediscovered my conservative roots as a fiscal vegetarian. Bad news is good news because at least I have the spare calories to eat and bake bread again which I really enjoy. This is my first batch back on the wagon, a classic Jim Lahey no-knead with a 24 hour rise:



I have another batch that I am about to proof that has risen quite well due to brewing beer as it fermented: my house was 90 degrees much of yesterday!



What can I say? I'm a breader. I bread. I now know this about myself.

Full Metal Boxers
Feb 20, 2007

COME LITTLE BITCOIN.... COME MY WAY.....IN THE MID NIGHT HOUR... I YELL NO NO NO... WITH A REBEL YELL I YELL MORE MORE MORE.... BIT COIN... I WANT TO FUCK YOU


I did a thing. King Arthur flour, roughly 70/30 mix of unbleached white and whole wheat.

Many thanks to therattle for making the first loaf of bread I have ever baked a success (mostly). It's a little chewy, and I forgot to slash the loaf until like ten minutes into baking the drat thing , but it sure is tasty! I've already got plans to start experimenting with the basic no-knead recipe in the OP as soon as this loaf is gone.

I'm mostly unemployed at the moment, getting by on Reserves checks and whatever freelance work I can find from time to time, so this is a huge help to my budget. Thanks again - this stuff is fantastic and I can't wait to start getting creative with it.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Full Metal Boxers posted:


I did a thing. King Arthur flour, roughly 70/30 mix of unbleached white and whole wheat.

Many thanks to therattle for making the first loaf of bread I have ever baked a success (mostly). It's a little chewy, and I forgot to slash the loaf until like ten minutes into baking the drat thing , but it sure is tasty! I've already got plans to start experimenting with the basic no-knead recipe in the OP as soon as this loaf is gone.

I'm mostly unemployed at the moment, getting by on Reserves checks and whatever freelance work I can find from time to time, so this is a huge help to my budget. Thanks again - this stuff is fantastic and I can't wait to start getting creative with it.

It's a real pleasure! I just got the ball rolling, others then picked it up and ran with it (to mix my metaphors).

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

Made my sourdough rolls last night! They were a success in that they were delicious, but only really a partial success. The 25 minute cooking time essentially turned into 40 minutes and still wasn't enough, probably because I used all whole wheat flour and my rolls came out slightly more dense than the original recipe. They also probably didn't rise enough on the last proofing after shaping and given it was getting on for past 1 am I had to go to bed. The flavour is great though!

TenKindsOfCrazy
Aug 11, 2010

Tell me a story with my pudding and tea.


Well so far in my bread baking my biggest hurdle has been creating something my four-year-old will eat. She's a picky eater to begin with but does love to eat super-soft, super-chewy rolls but so far I haven't been able to recreate them. I tried this recipe today: http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/...y-hoagie-rolls/





(Sorry no crumb shot. I was so excited to eat one by the time they'd cooled I forgot until after I got the homemade raspberry/blackberry jam my mom made on them.)

The inner crumb is nice but doesn't have that elastic, chewy texture I'm going for. I used AP flour. Is that where I'm going wrong? Do I need to break down and buy bread flour?

NightConqueror
Oct 5, 2006
im in ur base killin ur mans

TenKindsOfCrazy posted:

The inner crumb is nice but doesn't have that elastic, chewy texture I'm going for. I used AP flour. Is that where I'm going wrong? Do I need to break down and buy bread flour?

If you want more chew then you either need to cut back on the enrichments (think French Bread) or use bread flour. The higher protein content makes the bread much chewier.

US Foreign Policy
Jan 5, 2006

Things to liberate:
You
Your shit


US Foreign Policy posted:

So I've decided to step up my cooking skills by learning how to do a really good loaf of bread. I am a devout lover of all things sourdough and have decided to start there - my question is what is the best route to go for yeast? King Arthur sells a live sourdough starter that they talk a big game about, but there's also a lot of other brands I know nothing about, nor do I particularly know the in's and out's of sourdough yeast enough to know what to look for. Can anyone point me in the right direction, or recommend a good starter yeast for sourdough? apologies if this likely common question has already been addressed and I missed it.

Started a rye and pineapple juice starter after the replies to this post.







Judge my work

Romeo Charlie
Sep 7, 2012

Hanson: It's Time

Grimey Drawer

That's a great sourdough. It's a nice size and a nice crumb. I see that you don't have a thick crust but that really up to you if you want a thick crust or a soft crust.

I can see the ends got dried up and developed a skin while it was proving. Keep an eye on that and try keep your dough hydrated before it goes into the oven. You lose some color and looks dull if the dough has a dry skin on it before it gets baked out.

TenKindsOfCrazy
Aug 11, 2010

Tell me a story with my pudding and tea.


NightConqueror posted:

If you want more chew then you either need to cut back on the enrichments (think French Bread) or use bread flour. The higher protein content makes the bread much chewier.

You mean cut out the butter in the recipe?

It's possible that I'm not using the right terms to describe the bread my daughter will eat. I'm thinking specifically of some rolls my mom gets from a bakery. The crust is soft and the inside is very tender and the crumb is pretty dense, I guess, but super-soft. Lean doughs tend toward a harder crust, right? The ones I'm thinking of are almost soft enough to act kind of like play dough if you were to squeeze them in your hand.

She actually ate more than a couple of bites of this hoagie bread so I'm closer, at least.

oh no blimp issue
Feb 23, 2011



Does anyone have any tips for baking Gluten Free bread? I have a gluten allergy but I am jonesing for some bread in my diet.

Macdeo Lurjtux
Jul 5, 2011

BRRREADSTOOORRM!


On a similar note, are there any decent yeast free recipes? I'm just learning and want to keep in practice but I have to stay away from yeast for a while.

Nicol Bolas
Feb 13, 2009


Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

On a similar note, are there any decent yeast free recipes? I'm just learning and want to keep in practice but I have to stay away from yeast for a while.

I don't have any recipes, but I'm pretty sure the only way to make a bread without yeast is to do a quickbread leavened with baking powder, and that pretty much eliminates any possibility of a long rise. So maybe look for recipes that call for baking powder? The texture and technique will probably be totally different though.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

On a similar note, are there any decent yeast free recipes? I'm just learning and want to keep in practice but I have to stay away from yeast for a while.

Why?

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

On a similar note, are there any decent yeast free recipes? I'm just learning and want to keep in practice but I have to stay away from yeast for a while.
We had a quickbread thread at one point if you have archive access. In a thread named "Rise to me" you're not really going to find anything without yeast...

amishjosh
Jul 16, 2004
Yeah

You could always try a salt rising bread

Macdeo Lurjtux
Jul 5, 2011

BRRREADSTOOORRM!



Accidentally over did it on the fish oil supplements and gave myself gout. Have to spend the next 2-3 months ingesting as little yeast as possible.

Spikes32
Jul 25, 2013


Does anyone have suggestions for making sourdough starter where the tap water contains so many chloro amines that the starter bacteria just can't survive? I've tried making starter SEVERAL times and never had much success, the one time I did was with RO DI water, but eventually I got lazy and tried tap and the starter died within two days. I'd rather not be forced to buy bottled water just for my starter if I don't have to. I live in San Diego if that might make a difference.

Spikes32 fucked around with this message at Nov 9, 2013 around 19:38

Gwyneth Palpate
Jun 7, 2010

Do you want your breadcrumbs highlighted?

~SMcD

Spikes32 posted:

Does anyone have suggestions for making sourdough starter where the tap water contains so many chloro amines that the starter bacteria just can't survive? I've tried making starter SEVERAL times and never had much success, the one time I did was with RO DI water, but eventually I got lazy and tried tap and the starter died within two days. I'd rather not be forced to buy bottled water just for my starter if I don't have to. I like in San Diego if that might make a difference.

Have you tried buying a cheap pitcher water filter? Something like this:



Failing that, boil the water and let it come back to the proper temperature before using.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Spikes32 posted:

Does anyone have suggestions for making sourdough starter where the tap water contains so many chloro amines that the starter bacteria just can't survive? I've tried making starter SEVERAL times and never had much success, the one time I did was with RO DI water, but eventually I got lazy and tried tap and the starter died within two days. I'd rather not be forced to buy bottled water just for my starter if I don't have to. I live in San Diego if that might make a difference.
I live in San Diego and I got a sourdough starter going with tap water.

NightConqueror
Oct 5, 2006
im in ur base killin ur mans

Spikes32 posted:

Does anyone have suggestions for making sourdough starter where the tap water contains so many chloro amines that the starter bacteria just can't survive? I've tried making starter SEVERAL times and never had much success, the one time I did was with RO DI water, but eventually I got lazy and tried tap and the starter died within two days. I'd rather not be forced to buy bottled water just for my starter if I don't have to. I live in San Diego if that might make a difference.

It's hard to kill a starter with tap water. One of the biggest mistakes people make when they begin a starter is tossing it once it stops bubbling. The starter will go into a dormant stage after a very intense 1-2 days of bubbling (which is brought on by the bad bacteria). Eventually the PH lowers enough where the bad bacteria are killed off and the good bacteria start taking over. It generally takes upwards of two weeks to get a strong enough starter to raise a loaf of bread.

Spikes32
Jul 25, 2013


Thanks guys, I'll try again with the tap water and if that doesn't work buy some activated carbon and make some kind of cheap filter. Also, last time I've just done the whole tap water plus flour and let sit till it bubbles, then replace half with new flour and water. Any other suggestions?

Spikes32 fucked around with this message at Nov 10, 2013 around 16:25

Full Metal Boxers
Feb 20, 2007

COME LITTLE BITCOIN.... COME MY WAY.....IN THE MID NIGHT HOUR... I YELL NO NO NO... WITH A REBEL YELL I YELL MORE MORE MORE.... BIT COIN... I WANT TO FUCK YOU

Could anyone recommend a good place in the U.S. to find a decent silicone baking mat without getting ripped off?

In the meantime... 2nd loaf attempt was delicious, although still far more dense than expected:

There wasn't anything wrong with it per se, it just wasn't coming out exactly as advertised. So, I read back through the recipe and figured it out. Instant yeast. The recipe calls for instant yeast, and I was using regular old-fashioned dry yeast. Silly me. Loaf #3 is cooling on a cutting board now, so I'll be able to do a crumb shot soon, but before it even made it into the oven I could already tell that the dough seemed different, stickier, more like the images in the old No-Knead thread.


*edit* As promised:

Hmm. It's still very tasty, just, again, not the bubbly, airy result I was hoping for. King Arthur Flour (70/30 unbleached white/wheat), 66% hydration, 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp instant yeast; 2 hour room temperature rise, followed by two and a half days in the fridge, then an hour and a half warming back up on the counter before baking. What should I try changing?

Full Metal Boxers fucked around with this message at Nov 10, 2013 around 21:41

Spikes32
Jul 25, 2013


It looks fine except for the yeast ratio. Add more yeast if you have a time commitment, if not just give it more time till its actually doubled in size. Could take 6 hours though if you only use a fourth of a tsp.

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Full Metal Boxers
Feb 20, 2007

COME LITTLE BITCOIN.... COME MY WAY.....IN THE MID NIGHT HOUR... I YELL NO NO NO... WITH A REBEL YELL I YELL MORE MORE MORE.... BIT COIN... I WANT TO FUCK YOU

One of the "no-knead" recipes I've seen here mentions leaving it covered overnight and then baking afterwards; another (the King Arthur one, I think?) mentions a two-hour rise followed by refrigeration for up to a week.

Can I mix up the dough around bedtime, leave it to rise overnight, and then refrigerate afterwards? Or does it need to be baked right away if I leave it out that long?

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