Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«93 »
  • Post
  • Reply
sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

Ugh. I suck at getting moist dough into the oven

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

turtle_hermit
Dec 9, 2009



sweat poteto posted:

Ugh. I suck at getting moist dough into the oven

Use a baking sheet with no rim or a piece of cardboard as a peel.
Just rub some flour on it and give it a shake before loading to make sure it's loose.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Ricola-kun, tell me
about pizza cones!


turtle_hermit posted:

Use a baking sheet with no rim or a piece of cardboard as a peel.
Just rub some flour on it and give it a shake before loading to make sure it's loose.

I dump a big handful of cornmeal on the peel.

unixbeard
Dec 28, 2004



sweat poteto posted:

Ugh. I suck at getting moist dough into the oven



Me too. I proof mine on baking/parchment paper then keeping the loaf on the paper I put it all on the stone. Usually after about 15-20 mins I take out the paper and rotate the loaf.

Here is some sourdough I made today



Overall I am pretty happy with it, but I would like to have more control over how sour/tangy it is. At the moment it is not very sour at all. What part of the process determines how sour it will be? I understand it is about acetic acid build up but I don't know how exactly to encourage that in the process.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Use a long cold rise to get the bread more sour. Let the formed loaves rise in the fridge overnight if you got room for them.

unixbeard
Dec 28, 2004



axolotl farmer posted:

Use a long cold rise to get the bread more sour. Let the formed loaves rise in the fridge overnight if you got room for them.

I will give it a go, but why does that work?

ps how is your bread going?

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

A longer rise give the lactobacteria in the sourdough more time to do their stuff. The sourness probably comes more from lactic acid than acetic acid, but both are products of the bacteria more than the yeast.

I haven't been doing any sourdough for awhile, had problems getting my culture to actually make the dough rise. Tasted great, but every sourdough I baked came out flat and dense. I'll start up a culture again soon.

I'm mostly baking standard yeast bread now. My everyday bread is based on rågsikt, a flour mix made from 40% rye and 60% wheat. I like to put spices in my bread, things like coriander, caraway, aniseed and fennel. Finely chopped orange peel is really good in rye mix breads too.

unixbeard
Dec 28, 2004



axolotl farmer posted:

A longer rise give the lactobacteria in the sourdough more time to do their stuff. The sourness probably comes more from lactic acid than acetic acid, but both are products of the bacteria more than the yeast.

Wouldn't it slow any bacterial activity as well? Thanks though, I'll definitely give it a go. Do you think there would be any value in a second slow rise? Which would go something like this:

Mix/knead the dough
Slow ferment in the fridge 12-24 hours
Bring it to room temperature
Divide/shape
Slow proof in the fridge 12-24 hours
Bake

I usually have enough dough for 2 loaves so ill try both ways I guess.

quote:

I haven't been doing any sourdough for awhile, had problems getting my culture to actually make the dough rise. Tasted great, but every sourdough I baked came out flat and dense. I'll start up a culture again soon.

I'm mostly baking standard yeast bread now. My everyday bread is based on rågsikt, a flour mix made from 40% rye and 60% wheat. I like to put spices in my bread, things like coriander, caraway, aniseed and fennel. Finely chopped orange peel is really good in rye mix breads too.

I remember that. I still have no idea what might have been going on. It's taken me a long time to get to this stage where I feel I can make consistently decent bread, too long really. A lot of my problems were not kneading enough and not shaping it properly to form a decent skin, which is kinda hard to pick up from books, I still need more practise shaping. Also my oven is totally wack, it wasnt hot enough and I would also over bake which I still do a bit too.

Anyway I think now I'm gonna start messing round with different flours and ingredients. I really wanna try walnut bread and separately something with sundried tomatoes. Orange peel sounds weird. I miss the old food thread

unixbeard
Dec 28, 2004



Another thing I was thinking goes like this:

The sour/stinky part is the starter, so it seems like the properties of the starter (hydration ratio, how it is prepared, maintained over time, etc) and the proportion of starter in the final dough should impact on the final flavour? Like if I wanted a strong flavour I should use more starter and just enough flour/water to make it workable and get the hydration Im after.

wafflesnsegways
Jan 12, 2008
And that's why I was forced to surgically attach your hands to your face.

Someone else can explain better than me, but from what I've heard, stressed bacteria produce far more sour flavor. So how do you stress them? By throwing a lot of fresh flour at a relatively smaller culture. So using less starter and allowing more time to rise will actually create a more sour bread.

Soup in a Bag
Dec 4, 2009


This blog post seems like a good summary of a lot of sourdough science. It doesn't give direct recommendations, but it should give you plenty of ideas to try out with your own starter.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

unixbeard posted:

Orange peel sounds weird.

Dried bitter orange peel (seville orange, Pomeranze) is actually a classic bread spice. The fresh fruit is only available in early spring, and the dried peels you can buy are expensive and don't have enough flavor to be worth it.

I experimented and found that adding finely chopped peel from one standard orange actually gives a really nice flavor to rye mix bread.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

My wife and I absolutely love the Rosemary Sourdough loaves sold at Whole Foods. However, I hate paying $4/loaf. I'm pretty handy in the kitchen and have made baguettes and other boules before, but never anything sourdough as it's always seemed like loving magic to me for some reason.

So, any good recipes out there that could mimic the rosemary sourdough and any advice on what kind of starter would be best to culture for this? I saw earlier some recipes using raisins and other fruit to start it, but I don't know if that flavor carries over to the bread or not, which I don't think I would want it to.

Thanks for any help!

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I have questions about starter. I was reading through Tartine and when you're preparing the leaven you take about 20% of your starter and discard the remaining 80%? Can you do anything with that remaining 80%, or is it basically intended to be thrown out?

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


The flavor of the fruit if you use something like raisins, will not carry over into the bread on a starter, for a bunch of reasons, but mainly because you aren't actually doing anything with the fruit, just the water, and as you grow your starter there will be less and less of that water in the starter as time goes on. After a week of prepping your starter there is only going to be a tiny amount of raisin water still in the starter.

Using fruit just helps you accumulate yeast to build a good starter.

Its really not hard at all to make sourdough it just takes maintenance, and in some ways, a schedule. I mean, if you don't make at least a loaf of bread a week with it (or something else, like pretzels or pancakes or pizza) you'll just be wasting flour.

aldantefax posted:

I have questions about starter. I was reading through Tartine and when you're preparing the leaven you take about 20% of your starter and discard the remaining 80%? Can you do anything with that remaining 80%, or is it basically intended to be thrown out?

I've never thrown out that much starter, that seems excessively wasteful. You need some starter to keep your starter going but any other amount of starter you 'throw out' could instead be used to cook something obviously. (once you get your starter going I mean, the first week or so you'll probably be throwing starter out because you can't do anything with it until its fully healthy)

Generally what I do is I keep some fed starter in a mason jar in my fridge. When I'm going to use it I put it in a big bowl on my counter and let it come to room temp, then I feed it, then I use that to make stuff and put whatever is left over back in the mason jar.

FishBulb fucked around with this message at Nov 17, 2012 around 16:49

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



aldantefax posted:

I have questions about starter. I was reading through Tartine and when you're preparing the leaven you take about 20% of your starter and discard the remaining 80%? Can you do anything with that remaining 80%, or is it basically intended to be thrown out?

That seems like a lot to me too. You could maybe make pancakes with it shouldn't need to add too much more maybe an egg or two depending on how much you have.
Once your starter is established there shouldn't be any waste since you take out what you are using to make your bread and then replace it with equal amounts of flour and water.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Potato breads are fukken AWESOME!

Beo
Oct 9, 2007



So, I'm a bread newbie and was trying out no knead bread and it's just a sticky mess, the guides say just lightly flour your hands so you don't get dough sticking to it, but my hands always end up goopy as gently caress. I think I would rather just knead it normally. It's rising now I hope it's not a total failure!

MrGreenShirt
Mar 14, 2005

Hell of a book. It's about bunnies!


Ah, how I love no-knead bread. The trick that worked for me was to use flour for bowls and what not, and to keep my hands wet instead while working with the dough. The dough itself will still be a sticky mess, but at least your hands won't be.

Beo
Oct 9, 2007



It's in the oven now looks fine, I think but man I don't care how much you flour it putting it on a cotton towel turned into a mess.

MrGreenShirt
Mar 14, 2005

Hell of a book. It's about bunnies!


Hah, gently caress towels! For the second rising just flour the poo poo out of the bowl and afterwards peel it out of there with wet hands.

Beo
Oct 9, 2007



So it tastes amazing, and is crusty as hell, but due to the towel mishap and losing a lot to what stuck to my fingers it's not that big of a loaf haha, I will try it again with wet hands instead though.

I don't think it got hardly any rise in the oven.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Find an old wool blanket and use that to drape your dough with. For some reason bread dough is incapable of sticking to wool.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Beo posted:

So, I'm a bread newbie and was trying out no knead bread and it's just a sticky mess, the guides say just lightly flour your hands so you don't get dough sticking to it, but my hands always end up goopy as gently caress. I think I would rather just knead it normally. It's rising now I hope it's not a total failure!

The dough loosens quite a lot during the first rise, so when I make it I use just enough water to get a fully incorporated dough. if I add too much water, it becomes very slack and sticky and hard to work with. My usual technique is to fold the dough in the bowl a few times with a silicone spatula, then turn it onto a floured silicon baking sheet. I lightly flour the top, and that, combined with the floured base, allows me to safely grip and shape it without it sticking. Sometimes it does stick if I have not properly floured it and/or it is a very wet dough, and I have to start again, but not often. I dust the top with flour and cover with a towel. The flour stops it sticking. The shaped loaf is then transferred onto a smaller baking mat on a board; I slide the dough and mat into the cloche to bake.

MrGreenShirt posted:

Hah, gently caress towels! For the second rising just flour the poo poo out of the bowl and afterwards peel it out of there with wet hands.

A light covering of flour will stop towels sticking! I never out it ONTO a towel though - that sounds like a recipe for disaster - sticky, sticky disaster (and not the good kind).

Happy Hat posted:

Potato breads are fukken AWESOME!

Recipe please! Main wife wants potato bread.


I have a problem. My starter has gone bitter. Not sour, bitter (I know the difference!) - so much so that bread made with it is inedible. I had been keeping it in the fridge, feeding about once a week prior to a bake, then removing some starter to use, adding more flour and water to top it up again, and returning to the fridge. Bitter, bitter, bitter. Any ideas why, or how to salvage it?

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Ricola-kun, tell me
about pizza cones!


therattle posted:

I have a problem. My starter has gone bitter. Not sour, bitter (I know the difference!) - so much so that bread made with it is inedible. I had been keeping it in the fridge, feeding about once a week prior to a bake, then removing some starter to use, adding more flour and water to top it up again, and returning to the fridge. Bitter, bitter, bitter. Any ideas why, or how to salvage it?

I would just throw it out and start over; it's not like it'd take you long to regenerate it. I won't profess to know what happened with it, but getting colonized by a gross yeast or bacteria is a good start.

TVarmy
Sep 11, 2011

like food and water, my posting has no intrinsic value



Anyone familiar with these?

I saw one at a thrift store for $3 and bought it. Are they any good? Any recipes I should try baking in it?

I'm guessing it works a bit like the Dutch oven trick with the no knead bread.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

TVarmy posted:

Anyone familiar with these?

I saw one at a thrift store for $3 and bought it. Are they any good? Any recipes I should try baking in it?

I'm guessing it works a bit like the Dutch oven trick with the no knead bread.
I've got something similar but I preheat it and place the proofed dough into it, place heated lid on, and put it into the oven. It regulates temperature and keeps the steam inside, enhancing the rise. I've had excellent results with my dome-shaped ones. I don't think there are particular recipes. Try using it hot. Mine needed seasoning with oil.

Skrill.exe
Oct 3, 2007

"Bitcoin is a new financial concept entirely without precedent."

Jesus wept.



Based on The Doctor's recipe a few pages ago.

Revener
Aug 25, 2007

by angerbeet


The Doctor posted:

It's extremely simple!

For two biggish loaves:



That's a lotta dough! I braided it, coated it, and it's baking now. I'm debating whether or not to just turn the second into a round loaf, how does challah handle that?

Pictures of the finished product once I pull it out.



My braid was a little uneven it seems.

Revener fucked around with this message at Nov 20, 2012 around 05:19

geetee
Feb 2, 2004

>;[

Is that dough sitting on a plastic grocery bag?

Round challah works just fine. I usually make a rope and spiral it around itself. It's a traditional shape for at least one of the Jewish holy days.

geetee fucked around with this message at Nov 20, 2012 around 05:53

Revener
Aug 25, 2007

by angerbeet


geetee posted:

Is that dough sitting on a plastic grocery bag?

Round challah works just fine. I usually make a rope and spiral it around itself. It's a traditional shape for at least one of the Jewish holy days.

Yep, and it worked fantastically.

The round challah came out beautifully.

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

geetee posted:

Is that dough sitting on a plastic grocery bag?

poo poo yeah it is and that's how it's done.

e: It's an easy surface to let the dough rise on and then shift, doesn't require more dirty dishes, etc.

colonp
Apr 21, 2007
Hi!

...

colonp fucked around with this message at Mar 8, 2014 around 17:08

Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw





colonp posted:

I wash my mixing bowl, oil it up and use that with plastic wrap and a towel on top for the rise.

Same here, plus I balance the bowl on the radiator to to the first rise because my house is cold and breezy

geetee
Feb 2, 2004

>;[

The Doctor posted:

poo poo yeah it is and that's how it's done.

e: It's an easy surface to let the dough rise on and then shift, doesn't require more dirty dishes, etc.

Seems a little unsanitary to me. Who knows what's on them?

Revener
Aug 25, 2007

by angerbeet


geetee posted:

Seems a little unsanitary to me. Who knows what's on them?

Unless they were set on the ground, smeared with meat or left somewhere dirty I don't see why they would be any worse than a cutting board or coutertop.

I've switched from bowls because I consistently get a larger rise on flat surfaces, I'm sure there's a reason for this.

Not a Step
Feb 25, 2007
STILL A HACK


I bought some really cheap saltillo (basically just clay) tiles at Home Depot a few weeks ago for bread baking, and they've worked out pretty well. They were something like $1.50 each and two nicely fill my oven. They're not as nice as a real cloche oven but they've greatly improved my baking. Anyone still cooking on a baking sheet really should hit up the local building supplies store and grab some (unglazed!) ceramic tiles, its a huge leap in baking quality for cheap. Just make sure to thoroughly wash and then season the tiles with olive oil (basically just rub oil into the tile until it stops absorbing it, then bake it for a few hours) before you use them.

Are there any good rule of thumbs out there for how deeply and how many times you should slash your bread?

geetee
Feb 2, 2004

>;[

Revener posted:

Unless they were set on the ground, smeared with meat or left somewhere dirty I don't see why they would be any worse than a cutting board or coutertop.

I've switched from bowls because I consistently get a larger rise on flat surfaces, I'm sure there's a reason for this.

I don't know the history of my grocery bags or what might leech out of them. I'm sure it's safe 99% of the time.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Pookah posted:

Same here, plus I balance the bowl on the radiator to to the first rise because my house is cold and breezy

I put the bowl inside the oven and close the hatch. If you got an electric oven, turn on the light. Just remember this:

One click counter-clockwise: light turn on!

One click clockwise: welp,

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

The Doctor
Jul 8, 2007

The angels have my snatch

Fallen Rib

geetee posted:

Seems a little unsanitary to me. Who knows what's on them?

I'll be honest. I don't care. I truly don't. I won't even pretend I know what may or may not be on them. It's a bag that I put some dough on, then I bake the dough. My standards aren't that high.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«93 »