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His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Suspect Bucket posted:

I'd like to mill my own flour at some point, but I work on a farm and we have a small mill on hand. I'm also loving INSANE. But darn it, this acorn flour wont magic it's self into existence for my weird experiments.


Gorgeous. Looks like you got Pride Rock jutting out of it. Crumb shot?

Thanks, here's one I took now, I rembered I added a buncha bran to this too:

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other people
Jun 27, 2004
Associate Christ

I am trying to make my first loaf; it is from the Larousse Book of Bread. The boule recipe calls for 500g flour and 350g water which makes it 70% hydration? There is also 100g of liquid starter, 2g yeast, and 10g salt. I've started this so many times now I have the recipe memorized and have used almost all of the 4 cups of liquid started I made :p.

Anyway, when I mix it all together in the stand mixer for the allotted time with every ingredient at the specified temperature, it always ends up (imho) way too wet. I pull the dough hook out and the contents pool at the bottom of the bowl. It doesn't produce a lump a dough, more of a very sticky/stretchy batter.

I tried once with 600g flour and another with less water (330g) and while both started out forming more of a lump, by the time the mix was done they were back to creating a more liquid-like pool in the bowl.

From what I gather, this may mean there was too much water (duh), the water was too hot, or it wasn't mixed long enough. I've tried varying all of these things to some degree but always end up with much the same results.


I did once take it all the way to baking and I was surprised by how well the blob held its shape when baked as I expected it to flatten out before I even got it in the oven. The bread looked terrible but tasted great; the crust was amazing. So, maybe the dough really is supposed to be this wet? But it definitely doesn't look like the book's pictures (does it ever?!) and it is a joke trying to shape it or even score it. It can't be right.


Should I drop the amount of water even more? Use even colder water? Do something completely different?

Also, the book suggests 4 minutes mixing at "low" speed and then 6 minutes mixing at "high" speed. I've been using speed 2 for low and speed 6 for high. Does this seem reasonable? I note the Kitchenaid dough hook has a sticker on it saying to only ever use it at speed 2? Am I going to break the mixer?

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


His Divine Shadow posted:

Thanks, here's one I took now, I rembered I added a buncha bran to this too:


That is gorgeous. Helly jelly.

A bit of experimenting on the no-knead side of things. Added a tablespoon of vital wheat gluten to yesterday's batch of dough. Crumb was transformed into a very nice and elastic 'white bread' kind of taste and feel. A little jarring though with the super crunchy crust though. Probably wont add it again, as I like the dense dry crumb in this style of bread. But nice to know.

Actually, if you baked the no-knead recipe in a loaf pan without sealing in the steam, would you get a light crusted dense sandwich loaf?

Gonna hopefully mess with this sourdough starter soon. If I can make a nice no-knead sourdough loaf, i'll be in heaven.

PatMarshall
Apr 6, 2009



Hmm, assuming the starter is 100% hydration, that should work out to around 73% hydration, which is a wetter dough, but you should still be able to form a good boule. Try developing more gluten by working in a few stretch and folds during the bulk rise (after mixing and before shaping and proving). Could also be the flour you are using, do you know the approximate strength of your flour? Try using a higher protein brand and see if it performs better.

Good luck!

Kreez
Oct 18, 2003



This is probably a really stupid question, but what do you do for poofing if you're just making a simple boule, where the shaping action is going to knock pretty much no bulk fermentation gas out of the bread? I bake a single loaf at a time, and shape my dough into a rough boule for the bulk ferment, so shaping it into the final boule for proofing in a banneton results in basically no gas loss. Either I bake it right away and miss out on a bunch more fermentation flavour, let it double again and have a mass unable to support itself, or do I knock all the air out of it while shaping, even though every bread book goes nuts telling you not to knock any extra gas out of the dough while shaping?

If it matters, I'm generally using a 25% sourdough starter (100% hydration), 50% flour, 25% water formula for 60% hydration overall.

other people
Jun 27, 2004
Associate Christ

PatMarshall posted:

Hmm, assuming the starter is 100% hydration, that should work out to around 73% hydration, which is a wetter dough, but you should still be able to form a good boule. Try developing more gluten by working in a few stretch and folds during the bulk rise (after mixing and before shaping and proving). Could also be the flour you are using, do you know the approximate strength of your flour? Try using a higher protein brand and see if it performs better.

Good luck!

I had been using King Arthur plain flour but realized that the attempts I made yesterday were all accidentally done with their bread flour. Trying again right now with the plain flour.

When you say stretch and fold during the first rise, do you mean immediately before or after, or just at some point in the middle?

PatMarshall
Apr 6, 2009



Kaluza-Klein posted:

I had been using King Arthur plain flour but realized that the attempts I made yesterday were all accidentally done with their bread flour. Trying again right now with the plain flour.

When you say stretch and fold during the first rise, do you mean immediately before or after, or just at some point in the middle?

Both of those flours are pretty strong and should work well. I make most of my breads with KA.

I would do 2 to 3 stretch and folds during the bulk rise (every 30 to 45 minutes), more if it's a slower rise with a natural starter.

So, mix plus initial knead +0
+30 1st stretch and fold (I typically do a full letter fold)
+1:00 2nd stretch and fold
+1:30 3rd
Etc.

Then shape and proof when you normally would.

Kaine
Dec 28, 2005


I decided today to try something a little more challenging than a Sourdough or a plain white loaf so I delved into Challah.

Everything seemed to go well and they came out of the oven looking like this


and after an agonising wait for them to cool we had our first slices, so tasty.

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Kaine posted:

I decided today to try something a little more challenging than a Sourdough or a plain white loaf so I delved into Challah.

Everything seemed to go well and they came out of the oven looking like this


and after an agonising wait for them to cool we had our first slices, so tasty.


Challah is one of my favourite bakes. Though the recipe is kinda expensive, I actually find it to be a great beginner's loaf because the dough is so easy to handle and you get great results. I run my university's baking society and when people ask me to teach them to make bread I usually walk them through a challah.

Brawnfire
Jul 13, 2004

Come play my CYOA!

Save your reality from the Constructors... then save all the rest of them.




Just finished this up, will try to remember to take crumb shots when I get a chance.


Kaine posted:

I decided today to try something a little more challenging than a Sourdough or a plain white loaf so I delved into Challah.

Everything seemed to go well and they came out of the oven looking like this


and after an agonising wait for them to cool we had our first slices, so tasty.


Oh my god, I love challah. Way too much. I've been known to use challah buns for burgers for extra heart-stopping goodness.

Nude Hoxha Cameo
Sep 29, 2007






Decided to take a crack at some baguettes today:



Second time making bread, first time with baguettes; I'm pretty happy with the result.

Kaine
Dec 28, 2005


Brawnfire posted:

Oh my god, I love challah. Way too much. I've been known to use challah buns for burgers for extra heart-stopping goodness.

I only learned about Challah from this thread, we don't have a big Jewish population here in New Zealand so my knowledge of Jewish food comes from American sitcoms.

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Does anyone have any go-to no-knead sourdough recipes for a dutch oven? I wanna get in on this.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


To do a sour you'll need to do a levain and you will have to combine that, necessitating some mixing. Without the levain (created from a starter) you won't have the flavor of a sour as there won't be a foundation of the various acids that are created as a byproduct of fermentation.

Given that, a no kneed with a Dutch oven is easy peezy. Serious eats has a bread 101 article and the baking method will be your resource regarding the day of the cook.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Or maybe if you do room temp for half a day, then do a bench rest in the fridge for a couple days it'll be comparable. I have yet to try that, but my pizza dough after 5 has a good tang on it.

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Don't you worry, I've got so much starter, I don't use baker's yeast anymore.

Baba Oh Really
May 21, 2005
Get 'ER done


Can anyone share some good dark rye recipes? I've been googling some recipes but most don't seem up to snuff compared to something I can find in a local deli. This is probably my favorite bread as of now and I want to break out of the normal white/wheat variety sandwich breads I've been making the past year.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Cymbal Monkey posted:

Don't you worry, I've got so much starter, I don't use baker's yeast anymore.
I dunno your schedule but levain in the AM or PM, combine 8 hours later and do the bulk in the fridge for another day to three would likely work. Tartine Bread is a good book that emphasizes finding your own workflow; using a starter and different temps of water or retarding for whatever schedule.

Submarine Sandpaper fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2016 around 19:56

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Whoops

Chelb
Oct 24, 2010

I'm gonna show SA-kun my shitposting!


I made a bastardised Pane Francese for my dad, who wanted something big to make a sandwich out of. I think I overworked the dough a little, which is why despite being around an 75-80% hydration bread it's not particularly hole-y inside.



PhoenixShen
Feb 13, 2016





Today's bread bounty. An Italian bread recipe from Da Gemma in Amalfi Italty. Prettiest loaves I've made to date.

Nicol Bolas
Feb 13, 2009


The flour patterns on the outside of those are absolutely beautiful. How did you get that?

Chelb
Oct 24, 2010

I'm gonna show SA-kun my shitposting!


Nicol Bolas posted:

The flour patterns on the outside of those are absolutely beautiful. How did you get that?

probably by a proofing basket, also known as a banneton.

The scoring split the design into 2 symmetrical halves.

Chelb fucked around with this message at Feb 25, 2016 around 01:21

PhoenixShen
Feb 13, 2016



Banneton is correct.

mich
Feb 28, 2003
I may be racist but I'm the good kind of racist! You better put down those chopsticks, you HITLER!


Kaluza-Klein posted:

I had been using King Arthur plain flour but realized that the attempts I made yesterday were all accidentally done with their bread flour. Trying again right now with the plain flour.

When you say stretch and fold during the first rise, do you mean immediately before or after, or just at some point in the middle?

A series of stretch and folds at the beginning of bulk fermentation is great for developing structure in higher hydration doughs that start off too gloopy. Immediately after you mix your dough in the mixer, do a few stretch and folds. It helps to transfer your dough to a rectangular-ish shaped container to do this, or just your table top. Using a dough scraper is real helpful especially at first too. Three more times, at 30 minute intervals, stretch and fold the dough. Each time you stretch and fold, do it until you see the dough forming a bit more structure with the fold. After each subsequent interval you'll see and feel the dough develop more structure. If it doesn't, you're not stretching and folding enough times for each interval.

After those two hours, then continue your bulk fermentation as normal, like if you would usually put it in the fridge to retard fermentation, do it at that point, or continue fermentation at room temp if that's what you usually do.

bony tony
Aug 9, 2013

an electric ghost painted in the colours of a dead moment




PhoenixShen posted:



Today's bread bounty. An Italian bread recipe from Da Gemma in Amalfi Italty. Prettiest loaves I've made to date.

No ring

Chelb
Oct 24, 2010

I'm gonna show SA-kun my shitposting!


No matter what I do, I can't score baguettes, and it's really pissing me off. The 80% hydration dough just sticks to the blade. Applying oil does not help.

PhoenixShen
Feb 13, 2016



I started using the ceramic knives to score with instead of a lame. Found it makes a cleaner cut.

Premature
Dec 9, 2014

Shut your eyes, I don't want to get glitter in them.


Buglord

Does anyone have some recommendations for a decent soda bread recipe? I'm hosting a St Patrick's Day party and it's a good excuse to bake again.
I've tried a 'traditional' recipe with just flour, buttermilk, salt and soda but the flavour was pretty bland. I also tried an enriched dough with sugar, butter and egg. There was much more flavour but it was pretty underwhelming.
I will post pics of the results.

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Premature ejacula- posted:

Does anyone have some recommendations for a decent soda bread recipe? I'm hosting a St Patrick's Day party and it's a good excuse to bake again.
I've tried a 'traditional' recipe with just flour, buttermilk, salt and soda but the flavour was pretty bland. I also tried an enriched dough with sugar, butter and egg. There was much more flavour but it was pretty underwhelming.
I will post pics of the results.

http://gu.com/p/3mdmx?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

PhoenixShen
Feb 13, 2016




I don't understand what that means? Please explain?

hey girl you up
May 21, 2001

Forum Nice Guy


PhoenixShen posted:

I don't understand what that means? Please explain?

The pattern on the right loaf looks like the goatman.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

I'm rude now.




Made a sourdough boule for the first time in ages. Came out just about perfect.

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

Sweet Gods of Wheat that looks good! Cough up the details!

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



I watched Cooked on Netflix this weekend, and the Air episode was pretty interesting with all of the breadmaking. Is it really that easy to make a loaf of bread without commercial yeast, by allowing wild yeasts to leaven your dough? Every time Michael Pollan talked about bread being composed of only three ingredients (flour, water, salt), I kept wondering why he wasn't mentioning yeast. Have I been misled my whole life about this?

dedian
Sep 2, 2011


A sourdough starter (which is just flour and water) provides the naturally cultivated yeasts and bacteria (from the flour and your location) that do the same job of commercial yeast. It usually works slower, though. It can, depending on where you live, give you a different flavor vs commercial yeast.

If you can get starter from someone, that would be the easiest route to go, but it's not too bad to start yourself. You can use the starter in place of a poolish, or directly into a loaf and adjust flour/water accordingly (and time for rising/proofing, as well). It's a longer process but it's nice to have around and you don't necessarily need to feed it every week or whatever. I've let mine go for a month and it just took a longer to bounce back after a refresh.

dedian fucked around with this message at Feb 29, 2016 around 22:48

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

I'm rude now.


bolind posted:

Sweet Gods of Wheat that looks good! Cough up the details!

150g super active starter
300 g flour
225g water
8g salt

Tossed everything in the mixer with the dough hook for 4 minutes, covered and tossed in the fridge overnight. Pulled it back out and did a first rise on the counter for 3ish hours, stretching and folding every 30 minutes or so. Did a pre-shape on the counter, shaped again and let rise in a bowl for a hour.

Slashed and set on a cast iron griddle at 500F with a cup of water to steam for 3 minutes. Dropped a stainless steel bowl over the top and dropped down to 450F for 20 minutes. Another 20 minutes without the bowl and it was done.

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Have any of you built any proofing boxes? I'm thinking of making one and I need inspiration.

Tea Bone
Feb 18, 2011

I'm going for gasps.

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask as it's not strictly bread, but it's still baking.
I tried making some Cinnamon rolls this weekend, they came out okay, but the edges turned hard and crusty. Is there anything I should be adding to the recipe to keep the edges soft?

This is the recipe I followed: http://allrecipes.co.uk/recipe/4727...a-cinnabon.aspx

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Cimber
Feb 3, 2014


Anyone use buttermilk in their bread?

I'm doing a white/wheat mixture right now where instead of using 5 oz condenced milk I'm using 1 cup buttermilk. I'm going to assume the acidity of the buttermilk is going to slow down the rising time, so this is probably going to be an all day process.

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