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Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


So I realised recently that I've never actually seen anyone else use this trick I picked up from my mum. From time to time I freeze a loaf, I like to do this when I go travelling so I have bread right when I get back instead of having to spend a couple days without because it takes me two days to make a loaf. Anyways, when I want to thaw some bread, I use the oven, of course, but I find I can get substantially improved crust by wetting down the whole loaf before I put it in. I just whack it under the tap an throw it on the oven rack and the crust comes out beautifully.

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Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

Using thread advice I gave some bread a go for the first time ever.



Turned out not bad! Any goon knowledge that I may have missed for the best way to clean up dough other than me not being such a goddamn animal in my kitchen?

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!




Zenithe posted:

Using thread advice I gave some bread a go for the first time ever.



Turned out not bad! Any goon knowledge that I may have missed for the best way to clean up dough other than me not being such a goddamn animal in my kitchen?

Use a bench scraper and a very wet rag.

E-Money
Nov 12, 2005


I'm looking to try the serious eats breadmaking 101 recipe as my first bread attempt. (articles here: http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/breadmaking%20101 recipe here: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ead-recipe.html)

The recipe calls for making two loaves - I want to cut it in half since i don't have enough space in my tiny kitchen for that much dough or bread. am i correct that i can just divide everything by two and make no additional changes?

Original Recipe:
1000 grams all-purpose flour
700 grams room-temperature water
22 grams salt
4 grams instant yeast

would just be

500g AP flour
350g water
11g salt
2g instant yeast

Does this change the timing of the autolyse/bulk fermentation since there's half of everything? Everything else happens after the dough is divided so I think i'm good - just want to sanity check before I waste a bunch of time.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


yep. Timing will likely change but you should go by feel or bulk rather than time regardless

iospace
Apr 20, 2020




Grimey Drawer

Does anyone have any experience with the Costco brand flour?

Asking for a friend.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


it's regional iirc google the brand

Shame Boner
Jun 1, 2004



Cymbal Monkey posted:

So I realised recently that I've never actually seen anyone else use this trick ... I find I can get substantially improved crust by wetting down the whole loaf before I put it in. I just whack it under the tap an throw it on the oven rack and the crust comes out beautifully.

I do this and it also works great to revive the crust of stale loaves; just give it a quick run under the tap. It's kinda like spritzing water on the dough before it goes into the oven to encourage bubbly, crackly crust.

Here is my 3rd attempt at more sourdough loaves from the weekend before last:


The boule ended up with a golfball-sized void near the top, and the crumb in both was a little on the dense side. This was a problem with all my previous loaves. I'm not convinced I'm doing everything in my power during shaping to prevent this, but I've also read that it can be due to an immature starter. My starter is only a couple months old but it wasn't until this past week that I started getting a really good rise out of it. Previously it was struggling to get to 2x volume in a 12 hour period, but now it's easily exceeding 3x volume inside of 8 hours.

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

Don't worry, fellow perfectionist, those are absolutely gorgeous loaves.

Huxley
Oct 10, 2012



I discovered this weekend that my extremely basic, Joy of Cooking dinner roll dough makes better sandwich bread than any sandwich bread recipe I've ever used.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Shame Boner posted:

I do this and it also works great to revive the crust of stale loaves; just give it a quick run under the tap. It's kinda like spritzing water on the dough before it goes into the oven to encourage bubbly, crackly crust.

Here is my 3rd attempt at more sourdough loaves from the weekend before last:


The boule ended up with a golfball-sized void near the top, and the crumb in both was a little on the dense side. This was a problem with all my previous loaves. I'm not convinced I'm doing everything in my power during shaping to prevent this, but I've also read that it can be due to an immature starter. My starter is only a couple months old but it wasn't until this past week that I started getting a really good rise out of it. Previously it was struggling to get to 2x volume in a 12 hour period, but now it's easily exceeding 3x volume inside of 8 hours.

Yeah the crumb looks under fermented to me. Probably needed another hour or so before shaping.

Great scoring and spring though.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

First attempt at foccacia.



Partner doesn't like olives, or it would be have all the olives.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


emoji
Jun 4, 2004


I made a cranberry walnut loaf for Christmas using a recipe I found online. It was good but the bottom was overdone, even in a dutch oven. For Christmas I got some baking stuff and the America's Test Kitchen bread book which also has a recipe for it. They said it browned easily on the bottom and to use two stacked baking trays for insulation. Can I use a silicone baking mat instead to achieve the same effect?

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

How should sourdough starter smell? It was pretty inoffensive but I got home tonight and it smells a lot more like foot than I was expecting.

It's at day four if that matters.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


so long as it doesn't smell of acetone

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin

check out this dank rear end bread soup http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...oup-recipe.html

quick and easy to make and a great use of good old bread

Zenithe posted:

How should sourdough starter smell? It was pretty inoffensive but I got home tonight and it smells a lot more like foot than I was expecting.

It's at day four if that matters.

A new starter can go through a lot of weird colors and smells, including foot.

poverty goat fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2018 around 03:16

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Question on bagels and a step in the preparation...

I've been using this recipe:

https://www.chefsteps.com/activitie...ls-from-scratch

In the recipe, it begins with making a sponge with some of the flour, all the water, and all the yeast, and letting it sit for '2-3 hours, until it looks like the foam on a root beer float'.

My question is, what will happen in the recipe if the following occurs:

1) You don't let it sit long enough (say 1 hour instead of the 2-3).

2) You let it sit too long (not all day, but say 4-5 hours).

Reason I'm asking, is the recipe has been great for me. However, I've normally used King Arthur Bread Flour and usually wait about 3 hours (my house temperature is around 67 degrees), but the other day I was able to get my hands on some King Arthur Sir Lancelot, added an extra 3 tbsp of water to the recipe (based on King Arthur's recommendation to compensate for the flour), but I let the sponge go for 4 hours-the bagels turned out AMAZING-better than I've ever had before with the normal bread flour, but since there were a few variables I changed (increased hydration, longer sponge time, new flour), I'm just trying to see what the difference could have been.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



If too short the flavor won't be as developed and you might not get the same amount of rising power since the yeasts hadn't multiplied as much.
If too long it can affect flavor and rising times too. If the starter goes way too long the yeast cab start dying off when they run out of sugars to eat and the whole thing will start turing acidic and killing off the other remaining yeast cells.
There's a sweet spot between the two but it is largely dependent on your particular environment, room temp, etc...
It's worth it to keep a little note book and write down your room temps and water temps you use to feed it and how long it takes for it to get to where you need it to be to give you your desired flavor profile and an appropriate amount of raising power.
A place I used to work we made baguettes and other beads for the restaurant daily, but the baguttes were the most picky about the age of the starter. The afternoon shift would make it up before they left for the evening(7-8pm) and we would check it first thing in the morning(3-4am) sometimes depending on room temp it was almost ready to go and we'd have to throw it in the refrigerator to slow it down until we were ready to mix. Sometimes it would need to sit out for a few more hours until it was developed enough.
When it was developed enough it had a sweet "wheaty" smell to it and a little bit of a foam on top with what we always referred to as "rivulets" running through it. That was when it was optimal to use it. Less than that the baguttes didn't taste as good and more than that there was a danger they would turn out flat and ugly. When in doubt we'd try to undershoot it abit rather than over shoot it. The less flavorful baguttes still looked nice and had a nice flavor just not as full as the fully fermented starter would make them. The overly ripe starter would turn out flat ugly baguttes that we couldn't serve. That only happened once in the time I was there. We had to scramble and make a new batch of dough using the straight dough method(no starter) to have bread for that nights service.

E: To add photo of baguttes

Thumposaurus fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2018 around 16:04

charliebravo77
Jun 11, 2003



Got my wife FWSY for Xmas, first batch didn't really rise, yeast might have been dead. Got some fresh yeast and tried again. Also had to add a bit more water than the standard recipe as the flour really didn't seem to be hydrating and it's super dry in the house right now. Gave it a go and miracle of miracles we have bread! Probably need to cut back the water just a tiny bit but it came out better than any other bread baking attempt we've ever done.



nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Thumposaurus posted:

If too short the flavor won't be as developed and you might not get the same amount of rising power since the yeasts hadn't multiplied as much.
If too long it can affect flavor and rising times too. If the starter goes way too long the yeast cab start dying off when they run out of sugars to eat and the whole thing will start turing acidic and killing off the other remaining yeast cells.
There's a sweet spot between the two but it is largely dependent on your particular environment, room temp, etc...
It's worth it to keep a little note book and write down your room temps and water temps you use to feed it and how long it takes for it to get to where you need it to be to give you your desired flavor profile and an appropriate amount of raising power.
A place I used to work we made baguettes and other beads for the restaurant daily, but the baguttes were the most picky about the age of the starter. The afternoon shift would make it up before they left for the evening(7-8pm) and we would check it first thing in the morning(3-4am) sometimes depending on room temp it was almost ready to go and we'd have to throw it in the refrigerator to slow it down until we were ready to mix. Sometimes it would need to sit out for a few more hours until it was developed enough.
When it was developed enough it had a sweet "wheaty" smell to it and a little bit of a foam on top with what we always referred to as "rivulets" running through it. That was when it was optimal to use it. Less than that the baguttes didn't taste as good and more than that there was a danger they would turn out flat and ugly. When in doubt we'd try to undershoot it abit rather than over shoot it. The less flavorful baguttes still looked nice and had a nice flavor just not as full as the fully fermented starter would make them. The overly ripe starter would turn out flat ugly baguttes that we couldn't serve. That only happened once in the time I was there. We had to scramble and make a new batch of dough using the straight dough method(no starter) to have bread for that nights service.

E: To add photo of baguttes


This was great-thanks so much!

Also, a picture of the bagels:

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

so long as it doesn't smell of acetone

It does now, and after doing some more reading I think maybe it was a bad week to make it, we've had three days around 38C.

Think I'll start again when the weather isn't disgusting.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin

Zenithe posted:

It does now, and after doing some more reading I think maybe it was a bad week to make it, we've had three days around 38C.

Think I'll start again when the weather isn't disgusting.

Don't get spooked by weird smells from new starter, just keep it going and see what happens. Worst case you throw it away in a few days. Just don't try to make bread with it until it's less frightening

Shame Boner
Jun 1, 2004



Zenithe posted:

It does now, and after doing some more reading I think maybe it was a bad week to make it, we've had three days around 38C.

After a day last week where I completely neglected my starter for 24 hours it smelled heavily like acetone. Each feeding for days afterward, the smell would tend toward acetone but I was able to slowly "breed it out" with regular feedings. It seems like any time you let things slide like this, it throws off the balance of your population and it takes some time to get it back to normal.

ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

I think you'll also find that with time your starter will be more "tough" to wild outside changes. My starter is old as bones and is punky as hell, it's survived a lot. Also, you'll learn which smells are good sour smells and bad sour smells.

E-Money
Nov 12, 2005


E-Money posted:

I'm looking to try the serious eats breadmaking 101 recipe as my first bread attempt. (articles here: http://www.seriouseats.com/tags/breadmaking%20101 recipe here: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ead-recipe.html)

The recipe calls for making two loaves - I want to cut it in half since i don't have enough space in my tiny kitchen for that much dough or bread. am i correct that i can just divide everything by two and make no additional changes?

Original Recipe:
1000 grams all-purpose flour
700 grams room-temperature water
22 grams salt
4 grams instant yeast

would just be

500g AP flour
350g water
11g salt
2g instant yeast

Does this change the timing of the autolyse/bulk fermentation since there's half of everything? Everything else happens after the dough is divided so I think i'm good - just want to sanity check before I waste a bunch of time.

God damnit. This went awesomely and then of all the things to gently caress up, i hosed up the BAKE! Somehow my ancient gas oven is a million times hotter than it read. it looked fine when i took the lid off the dutch oven to vent, so it must have burned super fast.

https://imgur.com/a/G4hs4

I could have screwed up literally any other way and ended up with something edible. This looks like charcoal.

Huxley
Oct 10, 2012



Aw hell, if you can get into it I bet the insides aren't so bad.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


looks like it was broiled. rip top heating elements.

Shame Boner posted:

After a day last week where I completely neglected my starter for 24 hours it smelled heavily like acetone. Each feeding for days afterward, the smell would tend toward acetone but I was able to slowly "breed it out" with regular feedings. It seems like any time you let things slide like this, it throws off the balance of your population and it takes some time to get it back to normal.
Your starter was already healthy. Usually a new one will form a layer of liquid when it takes that smell (which I should have specified). When I had a bad new starter, compared to a weekend of neglect, it was paint thinner vs rubber cement in the huffing department.

Submarine Sandpaper fucked around with this message at Jan 16, 2018 around 21:15

E-Money
Nov 12, 2005


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

looks like it was broiled. rip top heating elements.

It's a gas oven - i am pretty sure the heating element is at the bottom (because i have a broiler bottom drawer) - and i put it on the bottom rack.

Cracked it open and everything inside is edible at least:

https://imgur.com/a/V35CY

I think it's overproved and maybe a little bit underbaked (since it got nuked so hard on the outside.) Next time will dial in my real oven temperature and get it closer to right.

E-Money fucked around with this message at Jan 16, 2018 around 21:46

Shame Boner
Jun 1, 2004



Submarine Sandpaper posted:

looks like it was broiled. rip top heating elements.

Your starter was already healthy. Usually a new one will form a layer of liquid when it takes that smell (which I should have specified). When I had a bad new starter, compared to a weekend of neglect, it was paint thinner vs rubber cement in the huffing department.

Ah, thanks for the clarification. I've seen mine form a little liquid on top when I store it in the fridge for a couple weeks, but I've never experienced anything like that! I ferment a number of foods and beverages and have never had any of my cultures, wild or otherwise, go bad in any way [knocks on wood].

In breadmaking news, I tried a high hydration bread this weekend and while it was absolutely delicious, I had my worst rise yet. The recipe was 92% malted bread flour and 8% whole wheat with 85% hydration. Since I'm used to recipes around 75% hydration, I cut back the water and ended up around 82%. It was still hell to work with and especially to form the loaves. I gave the levain longer to ferment this time; from the usual 6 hours (where it's still rising) to 12 (where it was just starting to fall). After a 16 hour proof at 38 degrees, the loaves hadn't risen much at all, but they usually don't and have good oven spring anyway. Not this time!

Stefan Prodan
Jan 7, 2002

I deeply respect you as a human being... Some day I'm gonna make you *Mrs* Buck Turgidson!

Tried to make bread today which I've done successfully before, but it came out really dense?



I can't tell if it's just underdone but like I actually cooked it for 10 mins longer than the recipe called for, so I don't know why it wouldn't have cooked.

The recipe called for 10 mins under a stainless steel bowl then 15 mins without, on 450 F, which I did, then I gave it another 10 mins because the top looked very blonde and it didn't look done.

I made it this morning and let it rise for one hour, folded it down, then another folding it down after another hour, then after the third hour I made it into a ball and cooked it.

I'm wondering if maybe I could have like pushed some of the air out of it before it went in the oven? Should I try to be really careful about just transferring it straight from the bowl to its final position in the oven without touching it too much to prevent this, or what?

Recipe was 450 g flour, 390 g water, 1 tsp yeast, 10 g salt, and like a tablespoon of olive oil

Stefan Prodan fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2018 around 16:58

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



Please timg that picture, it's breaking tables and also sucks to scroll through.

Don't go by time, go by volume and feel. An hour is usually not enough time for me in Oregon, especially in the colder months. Let the dough double in size before you progress through each step, and for the final proof, go by feel - the finger poke test is perfect. It also looks very underdone. Don't go by time there either, go by feel; when you rap the bottom of the bread with your knuckles, it should sound and feel hollow.

Stefan Prodan
Jan 7, 2002

I deeply respect you as a human being... Some day I'm gonna make you *Mrs* Buck Turgidson!

Oh sorry I'm on phone, I'll edit it

Stefan Prodan
Jan 7, 2002

I deeply respect you as a human being... Some day I'm gonna make you *Mrs* Buck Turgidson!

Well, I think I partly solved the mystery

I checked the expiration date on my jar of yeast and it was June 2017 -- oops!!

I assume that could explain the lack of rise, but I don't get how the recipe could be so far off in cook time? I'll cook it more next time, it did sound hollow to me when I hit it but I mean I'm not very good at judging obviously.

As for the finger test, the dough is so wet that it just sticks to my finger when I pull it back, so i assume you have to dust it with flour to do the test?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


For the finger test you should have better gluten development so by the end of final ferment you don't need flour to prevent sticking. That development will come from your initial kneed and also the primary fermentation. The dough should want to stick to the dough more than you. I generally wet my fingers/hands rather than use flour with wet doughs but ymmv

Proof your yeast

You may have also cut too early which will not allow the crumb to form correctly. Let it cool for a few hours if you didn't. Your top crust is thin compared to the bottom.

Stefan Prodan
Jan 7, 2002

I deeply respect you as a human being... Some day I'm gonna make you *Mrs* Buck Turgidson!

I didn't cut anything at all, this is all one batch of dough

edit: Oh you mean like after I cooked it, yeah I dunno I rested it an hour but maybe it needed longer

Yeah I dunno, I'm not sure I've ever had a dough that didn't stick to my fingers, maybe I didn't knead them long enough early on or something

Stefan Prodan fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2018 around 20:19

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


If you've never had a non sticky dough your shaping may be off without enough tension. Check out some youtube videos of high hydration handling. Also a good tell when you're shaping and all that on whether your gluten is formed is how it looks on the edges during the bench rest. The raw dough ought to be rounded like the edge of your baked loaf and not flatten out after 5-15 minutes of resting.

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

Stefan Prodan posted:

Tried to make bread today which I've done successfully before, but it came out really dense?



I can't tell if it's just underdone but like I actually cooked it for 10 mins longer than the recipe called for, so I don't know why it wouldn't have cooked.

The recipe called for 10 mins under a stainless steel bowl then 15 mins without, on 450 F, which I did, then I gave it another 10 mins because the top looked very blonde and it didn't look done.

I made it this morning and let it rise for one hour, folded it down, then another folding it down after another hour, then after the third hour I made it into a ball and cooked it.

I'm wondering if maybe I could have like pushed some of the air out of it before it went in the oven? Should I try to be really careful about just transferring it straight from the bowl to its final position in the oven without touching it too much to prevent this, or what?

Recipe was 450 g flour, 390 g water, 1 tsp yeast, 10 g salt, and like a tablespoon of olive oil

I definitely think your yeast was dead, but also that dough is 86% hydration, which is incredibly high and not something I'd recommend to anyone who didn't work with dough every day. Start with a recipe in the 70% range and work your way up from there.

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ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

Couple of sourdough loaves for the weekend!

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