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Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Dr. Klas posted:

Tell us more about this! How is this done and what is the end result supposed to be?

Doing it right now - will post pictures when we're done!

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Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Gluten experiment... what is oven spring about really?

This is enough dough for one(1) bun. Standard dough - kneaded for 5 minutes on the machine until gluten formation was satisfactory, after first rise.



Let's wash it... When you wash a dough, some of it is water soluble (well - I don't know about soluble, but some of it for sure isn't)..



We first hand wash it, so she can get a feeling for the gluten in her fingers...

After having felt that some of the dough gets washed away, and some of it doesn't we continue to wash it under a running fosset in a fine mesh sieve.



After the water runs clear, and for a while longer, because it is fun, we end up with the gluten..



So here's a size reference - there's no air in the gluten what so ever right now...


(Thanks for the cookies dino!!) The size of the cookie is a bit larger than a quarter - I would have compared it to a dollar bill, but my emergency lap-dance money is at work right now.

We then bake it at 240*c for about 17 minutes and get this...



.. money shot of the 'bun'.



The consistency of gluten is somewhat like the consistency of well-chewed gum, with a high hydration... it is more firm than egg-white, but it is snot like in consistency.

You can achieve the same by chewing freshly harvested small grain for a while, then you get 'farmers chewing gum' which basically is gluten (I think).

This is how oven spring works I think (also expansion of gas at heat - but...??)

Happy Hat fucked around with this message at Dec 28, 2012 around 14:05

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


And here's the finished product of her lesson today...

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



I'm super jealous of your steel countertops.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


me your dad posted:

I'm super jealous of your steel countertops.

Thanks - I love them too.. Also they're cheaper than granite...

Dr. Klas
Sep 30, 2005
Operating.....done!

Thanks, Happy Hat!

Choadmaster
Oct 7, 2004

I don't care how snug they fit, you're nuts!


Happy Hat posted:

Thanks - I love them too.. Also they're cheaper than granite...

I just redid my kitchen and I too am jealous. I have one short empty space in a corner where I am now contemplating installing some more cabinets and a section of steel countertop. I'm going to quickly go broke if I keep reading GWS (I don't dare add up what I've already spent since I first poked my head in here a couple months ago... Yikes).

About those "buns" (thanks for the writeup!) were they for educational purposes only or are they something worth eating? Your description of the texture did not sound appealing.

Fwiw, I didn't even realize you weren't a native English speaker; your English is certainly better than mine (archaic "fosset" [faucet] notwithstanding ). Forums search seems to indicate you're Danish - and the product of a tragic supermarket discount purchase. I would never have known.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Choadmaster posted:

About those "buns" (thanks for the writeup!) were they for educational purposes only or are they something worth eating? Your description of the texture did not sound appealing.
It got eaten - it tastes like... hmm.. nothing really. It's almost pure protein, and is reminscent of egg-white in taste.

Texturewise it is really interesting actually, it gets crunchy when baked, and it could be used as a good receptacle for other tastes - it is extremely fluffy, so I guess it could be easily stuffed with ice-cream for profiteroles, or with jams, or even savoury stuff.

Choadmaster posted:

Fwiw, I didn't even realize you weren't a native English speaker; your English is certainly better than mine (archaic "fosset" [faucet] notwithstanding ). Forums search seems to indicate you're Danish - and the product of a tragic supermarket discount purchase. I would never have known.

Ahh.. my reading at times leaks into my writing. No worries, I've started Italian now, so I foresee a lot of handgestures and genital touching in the future. (also thanks)

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Result of todays lesson


Still - not touched by me!

So proud!

therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Extracting gluten like that from bread dough is basically how you make tempeh seitan.

Vvv thanks!

therattle fucked around with this message at Dec 29, 2012 around 19:01

a dozen swans
Aug 24, 2012

See you, cyberspace cowboy...


therattle posted:

Extracting gluten like that from bread dough is basically how you make tempeh.

It is how you make seitan; tempeh involves fermenting soybeans and growing a mycelium to fill the gaps in the 'brick'. Neither is terribly difficult, but seitan is wheat and tempeh is soy.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Vagueabond posted:

It is how you make seitan; tempeh involves fermenting soybeans and growing a mycelium to fill the gaps in the 'brick'. Neither is terribly difficult, but seitan is wheat and tempeh is soy.

Actually you're both wrong...

It is the authenticated eductational method for 9yr girls of what gluten is, and what it's properties are.

She does not know what either tempeh nor seitan is, the latter did however spark some interesting thoughts about God and the purpose of life in general. Also why people would name a food 'Satan'.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



My first attempt at making bread:



That's the Artisan Bread in 5 method. It turned out fantastic, albeit a tad on the salty side. I added a tablespoon, so next time I'll reduce it by a smidge.

Will be used for lunch today

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?




Fair enough.


Son of a bitch, burnt it again!

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

If your bread isn't done inside, but is starting to get too brown on top, you can cover it with a loose sheet of foil or slide in a sheet pan over it.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



axolotl farmer posted:

If your bread isn't done inside, but is starting to get too brown on top, you can cover it with a loose sheet of foil or slide in a sheet pan over it.
That is a good tip, but maybe I should clarify a bit: I'm doing this in a small toaster oven with halogen lamps. I can just switch off the top lamp half way through. That requires me to monitor the baking process though

So maybe I should write just down this time that eight minutes is too much. Six minutes + the oven's cooling down period should probably do it.

Larry Horseplay
Oct 24, 2002



Just made this pretzel recipe for New Year's:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...pretzels-recipe

Really, really easy and really, really good. The food processor worked really well to knead the dough.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$





Reinhart's whole wheat sandwich bread, except I didnt enrich it with milk. Slightly confused why there was no oven spring. Still a really good taste and surprisingly moist. It feels dense in the hand but not in the mouth. This was actually my first time using a loaf pan ever. Next time I'll make a boule probably.

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.


I made my first bread ever the other day, but unfortunately didn't get any pictures. The yeast didn't seem to bubble much when I first put it in water, but the dough rose a little bit. It ended up being very, dense is the only way I can describe it, there weren't any air bubbles in it. Very crumby, almost cakelike in some ways. It didn't taste too bad though.

ambient oatmeal
Jun 23, 2012



Beardless posted:

I made my first bread ever the other day, but unfortunately didn't get any pictures. The yeast didn't seem to bubble much when I first put it in water, but the dough rose a little bit. It ended up being very, dense is the only way I can describe it, there weren't any air bubbles in it. Very crumby, almost cakelike in some ways. It didn't taste too bad though.

Did you use the individual packets of dry active yeast? I used those a few times and they didn't seem to work as well as anything else. Also, what kind of flour did you use? Heavier flours make a denser bread.

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.


Yeah, I used an individual packet. And I used store brand all purpose flour. When I get payed I think I'll pick up some King Arthur and some better yeast. Even though it didn't turn out as well as I'd hoped, it was still a very satisfying thing to do. And kneading is fun.

NightConqueror
Oct 5, 2006
im in ur base killin ur mans

Beardless posted:

I made my first bread ever the other day, but unfortunately didn't get any pictures. The yeast didn't seem to bubble much when I first put it in water, but the dough rose a little bit. It ended up being very, dense is the only way I can describe it, there weren't any air bubbles in it. Very crumby, almost cakelike in some ways. It didn't taste too bad though.

Make sure you give the bread enough time to rise, and then after you form it, give it another 20 minutes. When you score the bread don't press down on the it, but cut from an angle.

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


For anyone looking for Bob's Red Mill products, try Big Lots if you've got one around. Unexpectedly, they're having a BRM "giant event" with a couple varieties of flour and more than a dozen of the mixes and granolas. Also some rice and oats.

Flour prices were the best of the bunch at over half off; the other stuff was much closer to MSRP (some of it a whopping $0.10 off).

WhoIsYou
Jan 28, 2009


It's the January doldrums so work is shut down for the week. I've decided to spend my time making fancy bread. Today I mixed up some challah and made a three tiered loaf. Also, some knotted rolls from the leftover dough.




therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

WhoIsYou posted:

It's the January doldrums so work is shut down for the week. I've decided to spend my time making fancy bread. Today I mixed up some challah and made a three tiered loaf. Also, some knotted rolls from the leftover dough.






Wow, that looks absolutely amazing. How does it taste?

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

Today is an exciting baking day. I started my own sour-dough culture last July, and I've been feeding and developing it ever since. Have baked with it a few times, but over the last few months baking fell away with other commitments. So I aged and matured some of the yeast in the culture (Larger volume, longer development, smaller feeds, allowing for increased fermentation near the top, and maturity in the lower part of the jar, perhaps I should post on developing/maturing a starter and other sour dough trivia in a separate thread? I can't seem to find a SourDough thread.)

I've spent today on and off working on an all-day White Sour-Dough loaf to go with some Foix Gras that was gifted to us over Christmas. Overnight Sponge, kneaded dough mid-morning, 4 1hr risings, and now the loaf is shaped and doing its final 2hr prove before baking! I cannot wait to see how this turns out, a loaf normally only takes me a few hours.

The expected result is a light, fluffy loaf, full of huge holes, lots of air, with a real zing of flavor, here's fingers crossed it turns out ok!

BoyG
Nov 24, 2004


Muldoon

WhoIsYou posted:

It's the January doldrums so work is shut down for the week. I've decided to spend my time making fancy bread. Today I mixed up some challah and made a three tiered loaf. Also, some knotted rolls from the leftover dough.






Wow, yours looks great. Here's my attempt at an 8 plaited loaf

WhoIsYou
Jan 28, 2009


therattle posted:

Wow, that looks absolutely amazing. How does it taste?

I used a standard challah recipe, so it's nice and soft with a fine crumb. Made some more today.

Small two strand braid:


Five strand braid:


Another three layer braid; six strand on bottom, four in the middle, with a three strand on top:

Got impatient and didn't let this one proof long enough and left the oven a bit too hot so it got a little dark.

Bread ring:


Six pointed braided star:

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Hahahah that's hella ridiculous.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Monkahchi posted:

Today is an exciting baking day. I started my own sour-dough culture last July, and I've been feeding and developing it ever since. Have baked with it a few times, but over the last few months baking fell away with other commitments. So I aged and matured some of the yeast in the culture (Larger volume, longer development, smaller feeds, allowing for increased fermentation near the top, and maturity in the lower part of the jar, perhaps I should post on developing/maturing a starter and other sour dough trivia in a separate thread? I can't seem to find a SourDough thread.)
This would be super awesome. I have managed to keep my sourdough starter alive for like, a year or something, but I really have no idea what I am doing.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



I made my first sandwich loaf using this recipe. It worked, but it turned out really dense - my loaf from an 8.25" pan weighs 2.5 lbs! Where did I do wrong?

Monkahchi
Apr 29, 2012

Fresh Chops!

me your dad posted:

I made my first sandwich loaf using this recipe. It worked, but it turned out really dense - my loaf from an 8.25" pan weighs 2.5 lbs! Where did I do wrong?

If your bread is over heavy, I would guess that almost certainly you either:

a) Under-baked.
or
b) Under-proved.

Under-baking needn't mean not long enough, it may mean the initial temperature was not high enough, it needs to be about 250c+ initially to get a good spring. Also, are you using a tray of boiling water in the base of the oven to generate steam? this really helps.

That said, looking at the recipe I would guess its under-proving, the Honey will make the dough slow to do anything, I'd recommend proving for at LEAST 2 hours, but I'd probably head towards 3 or 4. Proving is what allows your dough to be airy, get good air bubbles and a consistent crumb.

Try again with a longer proving and the tips around baking (But for no longer as this bread recipe will go bad if over baked!) If you still have this problem, feel free to hit me up for my own standard white loaf recipe.

mmartinx
Nov 30, 2004


Made a bread basket for a dinner party this weekend. 2x NYT no knead, rosemary foccaccia, brioche

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Monkahchi posted:

If your bread is over heavy, I would guess that almost certainly you either:

a) Under-baked.
or
b) Under-proved.

Under-baking needn't mean not long enough, it may mean the initial temperature was not high enough, it needs to be about 250c+ initially to get a good spring. Also, are you using a tray of boiling water in the base of the oven to generate steam? this really helps.

That said, looking at the recipe I would guess its under-proving, the Honey will make the dough slow to do anything, I'd recommend proving for at LEAST 2 hours, but I'd probably head towards 3 or 4. Proving is what allows your dough to be airy, get good air bubbles and a consistent crumb.

Try again with a longer proving and the tips around baking (But for no longer as this bread recipe will go bad if over baked!) If you still have this problem, feel free to hit me up for my own standard white loaf recipe.

Thanks. I actually didn't use the boiling water for this loaf. So that's one thing I'll do differently next time.

I think I proofed that loaf for about 1.5 hours. Next loaf will see 4.

Feel free to give me your recipe. I am by no means stuck on any particular one.

mmartinx posted:

Made a bread basket for a dinner party this weekend. 2x NYT no knead, rosemary foccaccia, brioche



I have a shitload of Rosemary growing in our garden. Can you link the recipe you used for your focaccia?

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.








Made some bread with instant yeast packets and all purpose flour. I used a recipe from the Joy of Cooking, the basic white bread recipe.

WhoIsYou
Jan 28, 2009


Last day of vacation and my rye sourdough starter was finally mature. Made my first attempt at some loaves of 80% whole rye bread. They just came out of the oven, so I won't get to taste them until tomorrow evening, but they smell incredible.



Also experimented with a chocolate ciabatta style dough. Added about 10% sugar and instead of water, I used milk steeped with cocoa nibs. It has a very light sweetness with a slight chocolate nuttiness from the nibs. Next time I'd try steeping the nibs a bit longer or using the milk for the poolish, too. I dusted some with a cocoa powder sugar mix.

mmartinx
Nov 30, 2004


me your dad posted:

I have a shitload of Rosemary growing in our garden. Can you link the recipe you used for your focaccia?

http://books.google.com/books?id=lI...ocaccia&f=false

If I did it again I'd recommend doubling up on the rosemary, and making sure to press it in with your fingers. Also used double the amount of olive oil for step 6.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Focacce with steeped dried rosemary, the oil from tomato confit, and the tomatoes too...

100% durum.

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Also school buns for the kids..


Standard carrot buns with pumpkin and sunflower seeds

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therattle
Jul 24, 2007

I'm a family man - I run a family business. This is my son and my partner, H.W.


Soiled Meat

Happy Hat posted:

Focacce with steeped dried rosemary, the oil from tomato confit, and the tomatoes too...

100% durum.



Ah, I've been wanting to make focaccia with durum 00 wheat; fine grind, high protein. I love the idea of using steeped oil in it.

Do any of you sift your flour for bread? I do for other baking, but not bread baking.

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