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baquerd
Jul 2, 2007
I'M A FUCKING IDIOT



JudgeX posted:

How many folds are you doing? 4-4-3 or 4-3-3 it typical, a 4-fold being a book fold and a 3-fold being an envelope fold. Going off your picture alone, your butter got too hot when you were rolling one of the layers. As you practice more, you'll start to feel the butter inside gently spreading when it's the right temperature, even with a gentle press of the finger. If it smears, it's too hot and should go back in the cooler right away, if it breaks, let it sit for 4-5 minutes.

Thank you! I was doing 3-3-3-2 folds here. Never done a book fold, somehow I missed that technique when exploring this. Nothing to do now except make more croissants

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Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010



Last night I transferred my saison from primary to secondary fermentation, so I figured why not grab a sample and try to make a starter from it. It's bubbling gently on my countertop now. Does it seem reasonable to treat this like a sourdough starter both in terms of maintenance and application?

Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010



Pham Nuwen posted:

Last night I transferred my saison from primary to secondary fermentation, so I figured why not grab a sample and try to make a starter from it. It's bubbling gently on my countertop now. Does it seem reasonable to treat this like a sourdough starter both in terms of maintenance and application?

Double-posting but I used the starter in this recipe https://www.kingarthurflour.com/rec...gh-bread-recipe and while it's a very tasty loaf it's not very sour. I don't think the starter was super lively, maybe it needs longer to get established or really switch over to fermenting flour rather than beer wort.

Getting a dough scraper really made working with the dough a lot easier, although now I feel like I need one of those boards that has a lip to go over the counter edge.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


The lacto provide a lot of the sour flavor instead of the yeast so if you were not brewing with that in mind, yeah.

underage at the vape shop
May 11, 2011


I'm on attempt 2 of making a sourdough starter (the first one didn't rise after a few days and made a piddly puddle on top so I decided to start over with different flour) and I got a blue streak in it after around 26 hours. I scooped the blue streak out, should I bin it and start again? I read on the internet that if the starter gets stronger it will make it's own little acidic microclimate in the jar that will kill anything else off, but that sounds kinda bullshit to me.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


That's literally how cultures for cheese, bread, beer etc work.
If you're having trouble starting it then use some pineapple juice (I believe) to help kickstart the yeast. You'll want to feed every day at least, letting a weak one go too long will allow the baddies to overtake the yeast and lacto.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin

I just made a shady cash deal for 25lb of rye flour behind a restaurant

underage at the vape shop posted:

I'm on attempt 2 of making a sourdough starter (the first one didn't rise after a few days and made a piddly puddle on top so I decided to start over with different flour) and I got a blue streak in it after around 26 hours. I scooped the blue streak out, should I bin it and start again? I read on the internet that if the starter gets stronger it will make it's own little acidic microclimate in the jar that will kill anything else off, but that sounds kinda bullshit to me.

it's totally normal for it to go through all sorts of horrifying smells and colors over 1-2 weeks or more before it begins to resemble anything you'd want to eat. just give it time, and be sure not to eat it until it looks and smells edible

poverty goat fucked around with this message at Sep 3, 2018 around 17:27

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



underage at the vape shop posted:

I'm on attempt 2 of making a sourdough starter (the first one didn't rise after a few days and made a piddly puddle on top so I decided to start over with different flour) and I got a blue streak in it after around 26 hours. I scooped the blue streak out, should I bin it and start again? I read on the internet that if the starter gets stronger it will make it's own little acidic microclimate in the jar that will kill anything else off, but that sounds kinda bullshit to me.

If the good bacteria didn't kill the bad bacteria, sourdough starter would go bad pretty quickly, eh? So the trick is to keep feeding it a few times a day until it smells good. It will seem like it's gone bad a few times. Ignore that and keep going.

Or my own reasonably foolproof method is to mix a 1:1 mixture of pineapple juice and rye flour with a tiny pinch of yeast (calm down you baby, it'll taste like your local whatever soon enough, and anyway you're inoculating the yeast in the flour, not the air when you make a starter the normal way), let that sit for five days (so make a fair amount, probably 250g of each to start with) and then start feeding it on day six. No effort, but nobody who I've suggested it to has failed.

underage at the vape shop
May 11, 2011


sweet good to know it wont kill me. How much liquid on top is too much? I don't mean water, I mean the stuff the yeast is fermenting.

https://www.sbs.com.au/food/explain...urdough-starter

I've been following that guide, does it look reasonable? I'll go buy some pj for tomorrows feeding. I have anosmia so I'm going purely by look and colour.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



It's called hooch it's harmless just pour it off or stir it back in.

Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010



I made King Arthur's Russian black bread recipe: https://www.kingarthurflour.com/rec...ck-bread-recipe

It didn't rise a ton, but it tastes pretty good





Also, my Carl's sourdough starter came in. It revived nicely and I've given it the first feeding after the initial rehydration mix. I'll probably try making pancakes with the excess starter while it gets established.

underage at the vape shop
May 11, 2011


Sorry to be annoying and ask more questions but the pineapple juice i got, literally the only one in the supermarket that was real pinenapple juice btw, was in the long life section and is full of added sugar. Reckon its okay? And how long should I be giving my sourdough to grow? The guide I was following said 125g of starter (discarding the rest) with 125g of flour and 125g of water every ~24 hours. It doesn't gorw in size at all, the level of the flour goes down but the hooch brings it back to level it started at. The guide would have me beleive that it's capable of doubling in size by now

underage at the vape shop fucked around with this message at Sep 5, 2018 around 12:27

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


It will take like a week to two double in size in 12-24 hours. Without smell you're a bit rough off as it's a good tell on when you must feed prior to that. You should be feeding ever 24 hours but you can let the initial mixing go for 24-48. Hooch means that you're a bit late on feeding, generally.

underage at the vape shop
May 11, 2011


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

It will take like a week to two double in size in 12-24 hours. Without smell you're a bit rough off as it's a good tell on when you must feed prior to that. You should be feeding ever 24 hours but you can let the initial mixing go for 24-48. Hooch means that you're a bit late on feeding, generally.

I've been feeding it in the afternoon, and each time there's been a layer in the morning. Should i try 12 hour feeding? How can I describe the smell I'm looking for to another person, I don't live alone.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


I'd describe it as "not acetone, death, or sweet" sharp/vinegary and some alcohol is ok when it's time to feed with a mature one. Mine smells like acidic peaches now which is awesome. Until it takes it may smell like death a few times.

What's your ambient temp, what flour are you using (how old too), and are you using a scale? By volume it's a cup of flour to a half cup of water. Also if you know anyone who has one just get some of their discard of if you're in Ohio PM me. I started mine off with some rye, had bad luck with just white.

/e- if you're at 80 degrees yes every 12 after the first 24. I get hooch after a little less than a week in the fridge and never on the counter with daily feeding.

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



On the other hand, you can make the thinnest smearing of starter, dry it out in the freezer, and ship it in a SASE, so there's really no need to make your own. Local germs take over within a few weeks. If you want to, you can start your own - I certainly do. If not, there are plenty of free starters out there.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



I'll have to feed up my starter to show it but there are visual clues to look for when your starter is ready to use as well as smells.
The top of the fully fermented starter should have little "rivulets" on the surface.
It could be that your starter is doubling but you don't see it as it can only grow so big before it collapses in on itself. You want to catch it before it does that.
The bread bakery I used to work at the afternoon baker would feed it before he left at night and first thing when we came in we would check on where it was at. Sometimes it needed some more time at room temp before it was ready sometimes it needed to be thrown in the walk in to slow it down before we were ready to use it. There's a window of time you want to catch it at for optimum flavor and fermentation of your finished breads.
All of our breads with the exception of the brioche and baguettes were made using only the starter no additional yeast added.
The book "Flour, Water, Salt" by Ken Forkish gets recommended alot here for good reason he explains how to work with the starters from the initial building of the starter all the way through to the finished loaves very well.

underage at the vape shop
May 11, 2011


Its currently 12 (53) degrees, getting up to a maximum of 21(70) tomorrow. 24(75) the day after which is closer to normal. I'm in Australia so it might be hard to get it shipped through our customs, they are notoriously thorough, but I appreciate the offers. I want to try get it going by myself, I wanted to do it from the start for the challenge of doing it. The flour is less than a month old purchased from the store, and I'm using a scale. Using wholemeal plain flour, I made sure the packet said non bleached.

I'll get someone to smell it for me in the morning. It'll be funny if it smells like death.

I didn't realise it collapsed back down, but that makes perfect sense thinking about it. Its not like its pulling extra mass from somewhere to sustain itself. I'll try get a hold of that book

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Those highs are the temps you need to get one started easily. Keep it on the fridge or dryer or whatever when it's cooler.
If you restart or use a new container wash with some bicarb.
Bread Science by Emily Buehler is a good resource as well. Lots of troubleshooting but I don't recall exactly what was in the section for starters.

Pham Nuwen
Oct 30, 2010



I wanted to get rid of my saison yeast "starter" to make room for the Carl's starter, so I made a batch of pancakes per the recipe on http://carlsfriends.net/OTbrochure.html

The batter looked really thin but when I started cooking, they fluffed up just the right amount. They cooked beautifully, with better coloring and (it felt like) better tolerance to temperature than the usual instant pancake mix. Highly recommended!

Edit: please forgive the maple syrup detritus left over from the first one I ate

chutwig
May 28, 2001

BURLAP SATCHEL OF CRACKERJACKS

I've been trying out some baby baking recipes and made a no-knead boule in our Dutch oven that came out pretty well. It was nice and crusty and I enjoyed it. My heretic wife called it "burnt", but she seems to be allergic to the Mallaird reaction. She did have a bit of a point; the base of the boule was somewhat burned, even though the rest of it was fine.

What can I do to fix this for bread I make in the Dutch oven? I have parchment paper but it was specified as only being good up to 420 F, whereas the recipe I followed called for 450 F. Maybe I also didn't need to bake it at 450 F?

blixa
Jan 9, 2006

Kein bestandteil sein

chutwig posted:

I've been trying out some baby baking recipes and made a no-knead boule in our Dutch oven that came out pretty well. It was nice and crusty and I enjoyed it. My heretic wife called it "burnt", but she seems to be allergic to the Mallaird reaction. She did have a bit of a point; the base of the boule was somewhat burned, even though the rest of it was fine.

What can I do to fix this for bread I make in the Dutch oven? I have parchment paper but it was specified as only being good up to 420 F, whereas the recipe I followed called for 450 F. Maybe I also didn't need to bake it at 450 F?

I've had this issue when making both no-knead and sourdough in my dutch oven. I solved it by:

- Heat oven to 450 but drop to 425 when putting the loaf in
- Using parchment paper for the first part
- When the recipe calls for taking the lid off, put something that removes the bottom of the loaf away from the bottom of the pot (which is super hot) - I've had success with a small pot lid

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


higher rack as well

tsc
Jun 18, 2004
hostis humani generis





She popped a little on the side but that just means I had a little taste test.

Baking on a turned over cookie sheet resulted in Oneida brand bread.



I used a no-knead recipe but ended up kneading it anyway, throwing a few ice cubes in the bottom of the oven when I put the loaf in.

Murgos
Oct 21, 2010


I have a big pizza steel and was thinking of baking bread using it on my grill. Instead of making boules in a dutch oven, doing a long wide batard on the steel on a covered grill.

The grill can get A LOT hotter than my oven, 7-800 degrees if I use hardwood.

Is this idea dumb? Would I need to spritz in some extra water to generate steam?

baquerd
Jul 2, 2007
I'M A FUCKING IDIOT



Murgos posted:

I have a big pizza steel and was thinking of baking bread using it on my grill. Instead of making boules in a dutch oven, doing a long wide batard on the steel on a covered grill.

The grill can get A LOT hotter than my oven, 7-800 degrees if I use hardwood.

Is this idea dumb? Would I need to spritz in some extra water to generate steam?

Just cover your bread on the steel with a pan/bowl big enough to take the rise.

tsc
Jun 18, 2004
hostis humani generis



Having jalapeno cheese bread in 40 minutes is dangerous.

baquerd
Jul 2, 2007
I'M A FUCKING IDIOT



tsc posted:



Having jalapeno cheese bread in 40 minutes is dangerous.

Those look amazing. I now want to make a variant using brazilian cheese/tapioca bread.

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

Can anyone advise whether I actually need a 12 quart cambro per Flour Water Salt Yeast? I donít mind getting one if necessary or really useful but it seems excessively large. I already have a 12 quart square one I use for sous vide.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


no it's very large and you'll need to put wrap on the dough to prevent a skin because it's so large

Huxley
Oct 10, 2012



Lawnie posted:

Can anyone advise whether I actually need a 12 quart cambro per Flour Water Salt Yeast? I donít mind getting one if necessary or really useful but it seems excessively large. I already have a 12 quart square one I use for sous vide.

I make all my FSY bread in the top of a cake carrier.

https://www.amazon.com/Food-Storage...8ERMWY3A9XEDA17

E: To actually answer your question, and because Google makes math easy: my 13x7 cake carrier lid is about 9 quarts. The FSY 1kg dough at full rise comes about 2Ė3 inches from the rim.

Huxley fucked around with this message at Sep 18, 2018 around 15:13

Lawnie
Sep 5, 2006

That is my helmet
Give it back
you are a lion
It doesn't even fit


Grimey Drawer

Thanks, Iíll try a couple times with stuff I already have and see how it goes.

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



I recommend 6qt, and save the big ones for storage.

Maybe 8qt. Can't remember, I'm at work.

plester1
Jul 9, 2004

I am NOT a merry man!

I've done FWSY recipes in a round 6qt tub and it seems about perfect sized for a standard 2-loaf batch.

Murgos
Oct 21, 2010


I just use a large mixing bowl that came with a lid. I just eyeball the rise although I suppose I could get motivated and mark some levels on the inside with a sharpie.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


tsc posted:



Having jalapeno cheese bread in 40 minutes is dangerous.

Do you have a recipe for these? Never hard of jalapeno cheese bread before and I need to know more.

Sex Hobbit
Jul 24, 2007

because we are cat


Getting a head start on the holiday recipes- knocked out some pumpkin dinner rolls today.



A touch underproved and I need to get better at shaping these, but otherwise they came out pretty good.

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tsc
Jun 18, 2004
hostis humani generis

His Divine Shadow posted:

Do you have a recipe for these? Never hard of jalapeno cheese bread before and I need to know more.

Yes I do! It's a pretty loose recipe honestly.

1 cup warm water
1/4-1/3 c. olive oil
2 tablespoons active dry yeast
1 teaspoon salt
3 cups all-purpose flour
Oregano
Cheese
Chopped jalapeno/sliced for pretty topping

400 degree oven

Proof the yeast in the water (i just tossed the oil in there, 15 mins?), add salt and flour, oregano to taste. I used about a cup of shredded cheese in the dough and 2 chopped jalapenos (no seeds). Kneed/mixer it until it comes together (few minutes). Tore off chunks and tossed them in a (greased) giant muffin pan, more cheese on top, artful jalapeno slices. Let rise until they add about 50% of their volume, bake for 20 mins.

They could support a lot more cheese, to be honest. But they were nice and soft with a good crust and went very, very quick. I'm in California and this stuff is everywhere and I love it--You're apparently "supposed" to use pickled jalapenos but fresh were really good.

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