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10 Beers
May 21, 2005

Shit! I didn't bring a knife.



snyprmag posted:

I've been doing the perfect loaf's beginner sourdough and my results keep getting better. Still want a bit more rise, think I need to keep to first step somewhere warmer during the winter. Jan your loaf looks good and I may try that tartine recipe next.




Looks good! Is that wheat? If so, does it affect the taste of the sourdough?

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snyprmag
Oct 9, 2005



10 Beers posted:

Looks good! Is that wheat? If so, does it affect the taste of the sourdough?

here's the recipe It is suppose to be about 3/4 regular bread flour and 1/4 whole wheat (I replace the rye flour with whole wheat), but I think was closer to 50/50 cause I ran out of bread flour. I think the sour really compliments the hearty whole wheat flavor and makes for a very tasty loaf overall.

10 Beers
May 21, 2005

Shit! I didn't bring a knife.



snyprmag posted:

here's the recipe It is suppose to be about 3/4 regular bread flour and 1/4 whole wheat (I replace the rye flour with whole wheat), but I think was closer to 50/50 cause I ran out of bread flour. I think the sour really compliments the hearty whole wheat flavor and makes for a very tasty loaf overall.

Thanks!

Tom Smykowski
Jan 27, 2005

I already told you: I deal with the god damn customers so the engineers don't have to. I have people skills; I am good at dealing with people. Can't you understand that? What the hell is wrong with you people?


Grand Fromage posted:

You can get solid large toaster ovens on Taobao for like 300, I got one when I moved into my apartment, it served me well for years and moved onto another home when I left. One of my best purchases in China.

Ya, theres a toaster oven store nearby my place, too. Probably going to get one soon, just been experimenting with stove top bread.

Jan
Feb 26, 2008



Is there any reason to be a brand purist when it comes to flour? I've been using AP King Arthur for everything, but I'm starting to think I need whole wheat to up my sourdough game. My local grocery store is whole foods and they only stock their house 365 brand whole wheat, so it'd make my life a lot easier if I could just use that one.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


Jan posted:

Is there any reason to be a brand purist when it comes to flour? I've been using AP King Arthur for everything, but I'm starting to think I need whole wheat to up my sourdough game. My local grocery store is whole foods and they only stock their house 365 brand whole wheat, so it'd make my life a lot easier if I could just use that one.

I just use gold medal for most of my baking (except thereís a salmonella recall right now) with good enough results. Although I got some from Costco a while back (20 lb was the smallest amount) and it was the best stuff Iíd ever used, at least as far as really satisfying gluten behavior.

I treat flour like audio equipment, though. I know exactly how good I am and how good my sense of taste is and donít spend beyond that.

Splinter
Jul 4, 2003
Cowabunga!

I think the main thing to pay attention to is the difference in protein content between brands. For instance, King Arthur AP is 11.7%, Gold Medal AP is 10.5%.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



King Arthur flour also doesn't bleach or bromonate their flours.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


What is bromonation and what difference does it make?

Gold Medal has an unbleached version that I always get.

Iím gonna make my usual loaf with this King Arthur I just got and see how it compares.

shrimpwhiskers
Jan 9, 2019



First successful Bread! Now how do I stop from eating the whole loaf for lunch?

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



shrimpwhiskers posted:


First successful Bread! Now how do I stop from eating the whole loaf for lunch?
Image link fixed.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



HenryJLittlefinger posted:

What is bromonation and what difference does it make?

Gold Medal has an unbleached version that I always get.

I’m gonna make my usual loaf with this King Arthur I just got and see how it compares.

https://www.bobsredmill.com/blog/he...bleached-flour/

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin



shrimpwhiskers posted:


First successful Bread! Now how do I stop from eating the whole loaf for lunch?

always make two

umbrage
Sep 5, 2007

beast mode


Splinter posted:

I think the main thing to pay attention to is the difference in protein content between brands. For instance, King Arthur AP is 11.7%, Gold Medal AP is 10.5%.

I was flipping through Bakewise this weekend and one thing she mentioned was that the tolerance for protein content is much tighter with King Arthur versus other brands. Larger brands will only guarantee like 8-11%, which is good enough for government work, whereas KA will be to decimal precision.

She also lamented that brands like King Arthur and White Lily aren't nationally available, but generally professional kitchens are ordering sacks straight from the provider of their choice.

Also protein content can vary seasonally just based on harvest periods, even within brands.

Elderbean
Jun 10, 2013



Whats a good beginner bread that would complement a homemade stew?

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Elderbean posted:

Whats a good beginner bread that would complement a homemade stew?

http://210degrees.blogspot.com/2013...water-salt.html

Rozzbot
Nov 4, 2009

Pork, lamb, chicken and ham

poverty goat posted:

always make two

How do I stop eating two loaves for lunch?!

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



Put one in the freezer as soon as you make it. Then you have to wait until dinner for the second one to thaw

SixPabst
Oct 24, 2006



umbrage posted:

I was flipping through Bakewise this weekend and one thing she mentioned was that the tolerance for protein content is much tighter with King Arthur versus other brands. Larger brands will only guarantee like 8-11%, which is good enough for government work, whereas KA will be to decimal precision.

She also lamented that brands like King Arthur and White Lily aren't nationally available, but generally professional kitchens are ordering sacks straight from the provider of their choice.

Also protein content can vary seasonally just based on harvest periods, even within brands.

I agree with this. Iíve gotten the most consistent results overall using KAF. Itís definitely worth the few extra dollars.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin



shoutout to all my hagelslags

w00tmonger
Mar 9, 2011

F-F-FRIDAY NIGHT MOTHERFUCKERS


poverty goat posted:



shoutout to all my hagelslags

I love this stuff but I have 6 boxes sitting unused because the in-laws buy us a couple every christmas

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


spinach and artichoke dip stuffed soft pretzels. they didn't last long

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


Cross-posting my "hurrf durrf baking is hard" post from the general questions thread.

a doofus who thinks making bread is hard posted:

A weird derail in another thread introduced me to laffa bread. It seems ideal for me because I'm currently "squatting" in a friend's basement after losing my job and apartment. Cheap, easy carbs I can throw bulk lentils on, and not clog up my gracious hosts' kitchen for hours on end? Sign me up.

Most of the recipes call for making a whole lot more than I'd need, and I'd want to do a smallish batch to start just to make sure I'm doing it right. Can I scale down something like this:

https://www.joyofkosher.com/recipes/laffa-bread/

...just by simple division? Or do amounts of sugar and yeast and whatnot scale algorithmic when it comes to dough?

I'm good at cooking, but baking is still something of a mystery to me, being a science, not an art. If you saw me after I made my first no-knead bread, you'd think I'd just won a Nobel Prize, the way I was patting myself on the back.

tl, dr: Laffa bread. School me.

edit: also, a lot of the recipes imply that one has a mixer with a dough hook, which I do not. I have many other hand kitchen implements, and some small but strong arms. If I can make whipped cream by hand, am I qualified to mix this dough?

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013

I got super tired of seeing your avatar throwing those fuckin' glasses around in the astrology thread so I fixed it to a .jpg

JacquelineDempsey posted:

Cross-posting my "hurrf durrf baking is hard" post from the general questions thread.

I'm really sorry to hear about your situation. I was living with my sister not long ago and I don't have a job right now so I can sympathize.

You can just scale it and experiment from there. Yeast scaling can be weird. If anything, I'd go for 1/3 the yeast if you're doing half everything else.

You can knead it by hand. I actually prefer hand kneading to most machines, since orbital mixers and food processors tend to overoxidize and overheat bread dough. You'll know when it's ready. If it sticks to your hands, use oil or water, not more flour. For thin leavened breads like that I usually oil my hands before kneading and maybe another few times during the process, depending on how much it sticks.

To knead by hand, fold it over itself, then rotate about one third and stretch it out, gently pinning the dough against the kneading surface. Fold again. Turn and fold. Repeat. It'll start to feel natural and you'll get a rhythm going in a minute. Turn on some music.

Bread is more of an art than people give it credit for. It's more easily quantified than most other types of cooking, so you can definitely apply a scientific process to it, but you can just gently caress with FWSY and you'll get an edible product every time. Usually delicious, too!

Edit sorry, on review, 2/3 not 1/3 as much. Or just cut it in half. The amount of yeast really only determines two things, which are inversely correlated. Rise time and depth of flavor. The longer it rises, the better the flavor, to a point. My sweet spot is about 5 days. Enzymatic activity and acid development are responsible for the flavor difference.

SymmetryrtemmyS fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2019 around 01:04

Tekopo
Oct 24, 2008

When you see it, you'll shit yourself.


First experiments with baking bread. Usually my crust is like cement but I put some water in the oven while baking and it gave a very nice crackly crust. I think the underside was a bit underbaked but overall it was a step up from my usual bad baking:

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



Tekopo posted:

First experiments with baking bread. Usually my crust is like cement but I put some water in the oven while baking and it gave a very nice crackly crust. I think the underside was a bit underbaked but overall it was a step up from my usual bad baking:



I have a few small loaf pans that basically live in the bottom of my oven to be filled with water for certain breads. Likewise, if you have an old spray bottle or something you can spritz the inside of your oven and really get some steam going before putting bread in (but very very quickly so you don't lose heat).

Shame Boner
Jun 1, 2004



Tekopo posted:

First experiments with baking bread.

What do you bake in? Iíve used a Dutch oven and now a Lodge combo cooker and seem to always get results similar (but not quite) to a steam oven w/r/t crust. Iíve even tried spritzing the loaf before putting the lid on and it doesnít seem to make a bit of difference.

Tekopo
Oct 24, 2008

When you see it, you'll shit yourself.


Shame Boner posted:

What do you bake in? Iíve used a Dutch oven and now a Lodge combo cooker and seem to always get results similar (but not quite) to a steam oven w/r/t crust. Iíve even tried spritzing the loaf before putting the lid on and it doesnít seem to make a bit of difference.
I just put it on a baking tray: is it better to place it inside a recipient for baking?

Jan
Feb 26, 2008



Tekopo posted:

I just put it on a baking tray: is it better to place it inside a recipient for baking?

Unless you have a professional baking oven, a highly convective container like a dutch oven is the best way to get the high humidity and radiant heat you want to get a good, golden loaf. There's lots of literature on that subject out there, but here's a good side by side comparison: https://blog.kingarthurflour.com/20...ing-dutch-oven/

Seriously, this is the best improvement you can make for your home bread baking.

Tekopo
Oct 24, 2008

When you see it, you'll shit yourself.


Jan posted:

Unless you have a professional baking oven, a highly convective container like a dutch oven is the best way to get the high humidity and radiant heat you want to get a good, golden loaf. There's lots of literature on that subject out there, but here's a good side by side comparison: https://blog.kingarthurflour.com/20...ing-dutch-oven/

Seriously, this is the best improvement you can make for your home bread baking.
Oh wow, the comparison is amazing. The results Iíve been getting tended to look exactly like the left method without a Dutch oven, so Iíll make sure to get one next time Iím shopping. Thanks for the advice!

Hell Yeah
Dec 25, 2012





95% KA bread flour, 5% KA white whole wheat. 75% hydration, dutch oven method

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Jan posted:

Unless you have a professional baking oven, a highly convective container like a dutch oven is the best way to get the high humidity and radiant heat you want to get a good, golden loaf. There's lots of literature on that subject out there, but here's a good side by side comparison: https://blog.kingarthurflour.com/20...ing-dutch-oven/

Seriously, this is the best improvement you can make for your home bread baking.

yup

Huxley
Oct 10, 2012



Grimey Drawer

I want to bake smaller loaves, which means I need (or do I?) a dutch oven smaller than my 6 qt. A lot of places speak highly of this:

https://www.amazon.com/Emile-Henry-...=gateway&sr=8-1

But $130, boy I don't know. Anyone use something similar?

Splinter
Jul 4, 2003
Cowabunga!

The recipes I use say to use a 4 qt Dutch oven, but I've had no issues using my wider 6 qt.

Jan
Feb 26, 2008



Got myself some bannetons, followed FWSY's directions for the Tartine sourdough... I always worry because no matter how good the dough handles and how the proofing feels with the finger dent test, it ends up flopping into a pancake whenever I turn it out. Doesn't help that the brand new bannetons aren't well seasoned yet so it ended up sticking to it. Didn't matter, best results so far.








We're out of butter but I don't give a poo poo, half of that loaf is gone already.

Tekopo
Oct 24, 2008

When you see it, you'll shit yourself.


Went to a house party so I decided to try something new and it went alright. Salt content was better this time and the bread sprung back on touch. Issues of course was that I didnít seal the bottom properly so the bottom of the tin I cooked it on was a mess. Still relatively happy and people liked the pesto twirl. Buying a Dutch oven tomorrow and gonna experiment further, but so far Iíve had a lot of fun baking.


And yeah, I know, pesto bread is a cliche.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Jan posted:

Got myself some bannetons, followed FWSY's directions for the Tartine sourdough... I always worry because no matter how good the dough handles and how the proofing feels with the finger dent test, it ends up flopping into a pancake whenever I turn it out. Doesn't help that the brand new bannetons aren't well seasoned yet so it ended up sticking to it. Didn't matter, best results so far.








We're out of butter but I don't give a poo poo, half of that loaf is gone already.

Looking good.

Bagheera
Oct 30, 2003


Vinegary sourdough starter help.

My sourdough starter always has a super acidic flavor, like white vinegar. And it regularly has clear liquid sitting on top. When I fry a bit of the starter as a pancake, it tastes like wheat bread soaked in vinegar.

Research tells me this happens when the yeast has devoured all the available food, and bacteria take over, producing acetic acid. They say it can happen due to fast fermentation of underfeeding. I've tried the following

1) Reducing the temperature by storing it in the refrigerator for 10 hours a day. NOTE: I live in south Florida. My kitchen is humid, and stays between 75 and 80 degrees all day.
2) Adding cold water to slow fermentation.
3) Feeding double the recommended amount of flour/water each day.

Despite all that, my sourdough is extremely sour and often has a layer of vinegar on top. Is there anything else I can try?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


feed it twice a day. Is it rising and falling normally?

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Bagheera
Oct 30, 2003


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

feed it twice a day. Is it rising and falling normally?

I haven't checked to see if it's rising and falling. It bubbles up on top, but it doesn't look spongy like I've seen in photos.

I have a three-day weekend, so I'm making sourdough every morning this week. I'm following Joshua Weissman's recipe, which is very similar to the first sourdough recipe in Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast.

Here's the first loaf, prepared last night and baked this morning:


It has (IMO) a very sour flavor, much like what people call "San Francisco Sourdough." That's not what I was aiming for. It's also very dense; it didn't rise nearly as much as the overnight bread I make with regular yeast.

Soooo, my starter is proofing now. What should I do differently with the next loaf?

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