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Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



There's a Tuscan bread that I used to make at the old bakery I worked at that didn't use salt in it.

I've always found a serrated knife gets you jagged cuts in the loaf. It also helps to do it as fast as possible.
Everyone should sacrifice a loaf too and just let it go and over proof just so you can see what it looks like.
A lot of times people have a tendancy to underproof breads. If a loaf tears when it's baked it was underproofed.
I've personally seen loaves we thought were too far gone and over proofed bake up into the most beautiful bread.

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Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



NosmoKing posted:

I've been baking no-knead bread all the time recently. I've been using the artisan bread in 5 min a day recipes and techniques. Basically a 50% ish hydration dough that you keep in the refrigerator and hack a hunk off of when it's time to bake. Let it bench proof for a bit, slash, put in 450 degree oven. Makes decent bread and it's so much faster than the more complicated methods.

I asked this in the last bread thread and got no response, so I'm going to try again. Anyone have a good lavash recipe and or tips on making it??

Lavash

1 tsp yeast
1 c whole milk
1/2 c rye flour
3 1/2 c all purpose flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp sugar
1 Tbs olive oil
1 c cold water

Mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl
Add the milk and mix just till incorporated
Add the salt adjust the dough with water until it is not too dry
Mix by machine for 6-7 minuted or knead by hand until a smooth dough is formed
proof for 30 mins

Roll it thinly, brush with olive oil sprinkle with salt and parmesan cheese dock surface well with a fork.
Bake at about 350 until golden brown and crisp
You can either cut it before baking or break it into pieces after baking.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



aldantefax posted:

I have questions about starter. I was reading through Tartine and when you're preparing the leaven you take about 20% of your starter and discard the remaining 80%? Can you do anything with that remaining 80%, or is it basically intended to be thrown out?

That seems like a lot to me too. You could maybe make pancakes with it shouldn't need to add too much more maybe an egg or two depending on how much you have.
Once your starter is established there shouldn't be any waste since you take out what you are using to make your bread and then replace it with equal amounts of flour and water.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Find an old wool blanket and use that to drape your dough with. For some reason bread dough is incapable of sticking to wool.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



melon cat posted:

Just responding to say that I tried Doctor's recipe, and it's awesome.

Bread's a bit lop-sided though. Entirely my fault- I'm just bad at shaping the loaf. But the yielded breaded is amazing. Thanks for the recipe, Doctor.

What are the best ways to store this away while keeping it nice and fresh?

Save store bought bread bags and use them for storage.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Let them proof longer too. Usually when it splits it's because it hasn't fully risen.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



You can use a piece of stiff cloth to help it hold the shape as well.
It's done for baguettes all the time called a couche, linen or wool are the usual cloths used.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Put all the liquids and the yeast in the bowl first. If you are using instant yeast you really don't need to proof it. It won't hurt anything but it's not necessary.
Then your flour and the salt in last.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Mix all the seeds/oats you plan to use together and soak them all overnight. If you add a bunch of dry seeds to a dough it will disk up moisture from the dough and throw the hydration off.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



melon cat posted:

Does anyone have a good hamburger bun recipe? I've got a hankering for a good burger, but I'd like to try making a homemade bun.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...ger-buns-recipe
These are great buns.
Alternatively make brioche and shape as buns.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Made the rolls I posted above for a pot luck dinner to serve pulled pork on they were a big hit.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



I made a potato bread.


This was the first time I used this new loaf pan I picked up at the thrift store. I should have only put 2# in it instead of the whole 2#10oz the dough weighed. It kinda out grew the pan.
Live and learn. Going to write 2# on the bottom of the pan now.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



1#8oz potatoes
1/2 cup reserved potato water (see below)
2oz olive oil
1Tb yeast
1Tb salt
4 3/4 cups all purpose flour

Boil the potatoes in water until they are tender, I never peel them but you can if you want to.
After boiling reserve 1/2 cup of the potato water
Place potatoes in mixer bowl and beat until cooled.
Cool down the potato water too putting it in the freezer while the potatoes beat seems to work ok just don't want it too hot and kill the yeast.
Add the oil to the potatoes add yeast to the water
Add in the flour and mix just to combine with the paddle
Switch to the dough hook and let it go for about 11 mins.
It will be pretty soft and sticky still
Dust bench with flour and form into a ball
Let it rise till doubled
Shape, let rise 2nd time
Bake at about 375 until loaf sounds follow when tapped, it can take up to an hour.
If the top browns too much tent with foil.

It makes nice little rolls too.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Not giving it a long enough rise after shaping can lead to splitting as well.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Cinnamon Raisin bread from last night at work.

Usually bake it in loaf pans for the breakfast toast but there is always a piece that isn't the right size so I shape it and bake it off for us to eat.
I'd love to shape all our bread like this but Chef likes the uniformity that a pan gives to it.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Use cornmeal instead of flour. Flour is always going to absorb the water in the dough. Or just use parchment paper.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Everyone worried about the kneading not being up to par try giving your dough a couple of folds while it is proofing.
Gently take the ends and fold them over like folding a letter in thirds. It helps to be doing your proofing in a square shaped container but a bowl will work too. Give it 2 or 3 folds over the length of the proofing time and it will strengthen the gluten with each fold.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Souring a dough.

starter






The round boule is getting baked today, the one in the basket is going in the fridge overnight.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Double posting cause this thread is slow.

The round guy


Overnight guy

The overnight one has a thicker crust, more open crumb, more sourer.
If you have the time highly suggested to let a sour proof overnight it is so much better in every way.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Save the bags from store bought bread and re-use them is what I do.

I'll have a new phone shortly with a better camera so I'll take some more pictures of the stuff I do at work and throw them in here.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



SlayVus posted:

So, I've been reading through this thread and then I saw it.

The layered braided bread. How the heck do you get that to rise and cook properly?

Also, bread picture. Second day in my baking class(Been doing baking at the family restaurant(You can read how horrible it is in my thread I made about it)) decided to do some braided breads.



My teacher literally said,"That one is mine. You think I'm kidding, but I'm going home with that one."
What thread is this?

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



SlayVus posted:

(Been doing baking at the family restaurant(You can read how horrible it is in my thread I made about it)

I meant this part specifically smartass because I'm genuinely curious about it since I'm the bread baker for a restaurant.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Random stuff from work last night

Croissant dough

Laminating in process

After final turn 1 poke=first turn, 2 pokes=second turn, 3 pokes=third turn.

Finished laminated croissant dough


Bagels

Sourdough English muffins

Croissants

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Bagel dough is pretty stiff stuff it'll give your machine or arms a work out.
I do the hole poke too and spin them around on my two index fingers like I'm spinning a gun around 2 at a time. I'm usually making them 48 at a time so I gotta be as efficient as possible.
Other tips don't crowd the pot while they are boiling, as soon as you get them out and onto your tray/topped with whatever your gonna top them with get them in the oven asap. I've found the longer they sit in between the two they can deflate or get this weird wrinkled texture.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



I do this batch of dough multiple times a week so it's easy for me.
But tips for the first timer. Let the dough develop enough in the mixer or if kneading by hand. It takes on a satiny look and will clean the bowl as it is moved around by the hook.

Let the dough rest in the fridge overnight, develops flavor and helps to relax the glutens.
You want your dough and your butter to be roughly the same temperature, we use plugra brand butter at work, it seems like the "European" style butters work better for laminated doughs.

I take the blocks of not quite warm not quite cold butter and beat them with a rolling pin to flatten out into a block about 1/2" thick. Then you roll your dough out into a sheet a little bigger than double the size of your butter block. Seal the butter in the dough.
Roll it out and do the first turn fold it like a letter in thirds brushing off any excess flour and spritzing lightly with a water bottle.
Wrap and chill after each turn, my marble there is refrigerated so I don't have to chill it between turns.

After 3 turns roll it out to your final thickness and cut it into triangles, we always rest the triangles overnight as well it just makes the final pulling and rolling of the croissants so much easier.
Then you just let the trinagles warm up slightly and pull the bottom points out a bit and pull the middle point up a bunch and roll it up putting as little pressure as possible on the dough you don't want to smoosh your layers.
Then cover loosely with greased plastic wrap and proof about 3 hours or until doubled, eggwash, bake, and consume.

Oh and save your scraps you can stack them up keeping the layers going the same directions and re-roll it and use it like you would use puff pastry.

That was a lot of words.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Add some of your water(warmed) and a little bit of sugar and leave it for a little while in a warm place if it foams up it's fine. If it never does it's no good.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Strict Picnic posted:

I have the same issue. The flavor of most home-made overwhelms the taste of the meat in sandwiches, imho. The subtlety of Wonderbread really allows the meat to sing. Plus, the even slice distribution adds the ever important aspect of symmetry to the sandwich. Does anyone have any tips for getting such perfectly sized slices off of their loaf?

Practice? I can slice a loaf of bread into even slices without too much trouble.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



While the dough is proofing fold it like you would fold a letter in thirds over itself.
It helps to do the proofing in a rectangular container to do this. Do that 2 or 3 times letting it rise again between folds and it should help with the stickiness of the dough. As a bonus every time you do a fold it develops more gluten do the final texture if the bread should be improved as well.

The parchment isn't leeching anything into anything. If it bothers you you can remove it halfway through the baking.

How long to wait to cut it depends on how big the loaf is, what the shape is.
Bigger round loaves will take longer to cool than say a baguette. Leaving it on a cooling rack helps.
Give them at least 30 mins to cool.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Use a proofing basket or a couche for your final rise
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/bakers-couche
It will hold it in place if using a couche to do baguttes on you usually use a board to "flip" the baguette out of the couche and use that too out it into the oven. There are videos on YouTube of that.
A basket you just plop it gently onto your peel and out it in the oven.
Which one you use depends on what shape you want the loaf to be.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Grrl Anachronism posted:

Anyone have some advice in regards to egg wash? I make a lot of water challah- several loaves a week- and don't usually bother with a wash because I don't often keep eggs in the house. However I've been trying lately (since I have lots of eggs left over from holiday cookie baking) with egg and a tsp or so of liquid. However my bread never ends up as shiny and dark as others I see, just slightly more golden brown than usual. Am I missing something?

To get a super dark wash use just yolks and milk instead of water.
A pinch of salt never hurts either.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Grrl Anachronism posted:

Anyone have some advice in regards to egg wash? I make a lot of water challah- several loaves a week- and don't usually bother with a wash because I don't often keep eggs in the house. However I've been trying lately (since I have lots of eggs left over from holiday cookie baking) with egg and a tsp or so of liquid. However my bread never ends up as shiny and dark as others I see, just slightly more golden brown than usual. Am I missing something?

To get a super dark wash use just yolks and milk instead of water.
A pinch of salt never hurts either.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Grrl Anachronism posted:

Anyone have some advice in regards to egg wash? I make a lot of water challah- several loaves a week- and don't usually bother with a wash because I don't often keep eggs in the house. However I've been trying lately (since I have lots of eggs left over from holiday cookie baking) with egg and a tsp or so of liquid. However my bread never ends up as shiny and dark as others I see, just slightly more golden brown than usual. Am I missing something?

To get a super dark wash use just yolks and milk instead of water.
A pinch of salt never hurts either.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



I guess you could add baking soda to water to up the basidity(?) of it.
You do that when you make pretzels but with lye traditionally.

That whole triple post fiasco was the result of the awful app and a dodgy WiFi connection.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



SymmetryrtemmyS posted:

You can, but the salts produced by adding baking soda to water cause anionic action, inhibiting yeast activity and causing a smaller bread. That's why the remixing procedure I detailed is recommended.

I just ment adding it in to your egg washing water.
That whole procedure sounds interesting though I might give it a try at work while we are slow fir the next couple months.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Roasted garlic sourdough fougasse made last night.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



PiratePing posted:

That looks delicious, please tell me the recipe so I can garlic-bomb the house.

All my recipes are in grams so if you don't have a scale sorry.

2 heads of garlic roasted and cooled
250g water
400g sourdough starter
20g yeast
450g bread flour
20g salt

I added the roasted garlic mush in with the sourdough starter at the beginning of the mixing.
Mix the dough and let it proof until doubled.
Divide it into 2 pieces and form into a ball flatten and stretch each piece of dough into a rough oval.
Place on your pan of choice lightly oiled.
Slice all the way through the dough once vertically down the middle and however many you wish sorta diagonal. It's supposed to resemble a leaf.
Cover and let proof for about an hour or so.
Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with coarse salt.
Bake at 425 for 10-15 mins.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Christmas Miracle posted:

it's a modified no knead bread i've been tinkering with for a while. i like the regular no knead bread but i wanted it to be a bit easier to work with, so i took out some of the water and increased the fermentation time a little.

i make a smaller loaf usually:
350 g KA bread flour
270 g water
1/4 tsp yeast
10 g salt

mix it all together and ferment for 15-20 hours. flour your hands and a piece of parchment and the top of the dough and get the dough out of there any way you can onto the parchment. the top (what used to be on the bottom of the bowl) should be unfloured, so start grabbing it from the bottom (floured) and pinch the unfloured part together until the skin on the floured side gets tighter, then shape it into a loaf. make some cuts in the top and immediately put the loaf with the parchment paper into a preheated dutch oven in a 425 F oven for 35 mins. remove the cover and bake another 12 minutes.

Wait shaped then straight into the oven no 2nd proofing after it was shaped?
That's probably why it cracked on top. It's usually caused by not letting the loaf proof enough after being shaped.
The outside of the bread is too tight and can't stretch as fast as the inside grows when it goes into the oven.
Letting it proof a 2nd time after shaping lets the dough relax a bit.
You should be able to push a finger gently into the dough and have it not spring back, that's when you know its ready to bake.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



It makes a huge difference.
The colder water will make the dough take longer to proof, but in theory develops more flavor over the longer proofing period.
Your water should be warm-ish but not hot. Body temp is a good goal to aim for.
Anything over 120 or so can kill the yeast so you can't take it too far.
The process of mixing/kneading will develop some heat as well.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



http://www.theartisan.net/temperatu...ol_baking_1.htm
Here's a pretty massive article that goes into detail about why it matters.

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Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Dr. Video Games 0089 posted:

That sounds likely. It has been about 55F-60F in my kitchen this past week. Is there some sort of signs on the dough for me to know when its good to start baking? Or should I just leave it out for 1-2 hours??

If you gently push a finger into the loaf while it's proofing when it's ready to go in the oven it shouldn't spring back much if at all when you poke it.

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