Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Post
  • Reply
Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


There are a few cool sites about breadmaking, I don't know if they have been brought up but between thefreshloaf.com and wildyeastblog.com (and its Yeastspotting category) you have a large index of recipes and discussions.
That said, I would also be interested in someone who has made something like a sourdough starter to share, I want to try making one but am concerned about things like waste: is this recipe better than this other one, how much do I really need to feed it, how much is too much/will I really use this much, and then storing it.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


daggerdragon posted:

Yes. However, I never got a dough, it just immediately went to pulled-chicken crumbles. Beating it for another half hour juuuust barely let me squish it hardcore into small loaf-shaped lumps that looks like brains. It looks like bread (and brains), it smells like bread, might as well bake it and see what comes out. I'm fully expecting it to just explode and make a mess in the oven, but who knows.

Yeah it definitely seems like it doesn't have enough liquid, if it isn't actually forming a cohesive mass. I've found that some people have a few rules like holding back 50 g of flour (between 1/3 and 1/2 cup if you don't have a scale - I would just hold back a 1/2 cup and add it gradually, plus, if you need it, whatever the recipe will specify for "dusting/kneading"), or adding in flour a cup at a time and mixing until it is fully incorporated before adding more, the idea being that it is better to have a wetter dough and add flour while kneading rather than trying to incorporate water into a dough that has already sort of come together.

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Does anyone have a concrete list of how to convert to and from instant yeast for fresh/cake or active dry yeast? I bought one of those 1 lb bags of instant yeast, but I know a lot of recipes I usually use call for active dry and I have a family recipe that calls for cake yeast (one of my great-grandmothers was apparently the owner of a bakery around the turn of the century and my grandmother wants me to make her bread for Christmas). I read in one of Peter Reinhart's books that there is a conversion, but I had only checked the book out from the library and had to return it.

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Can you replace most of or all of the liquid (excluding the water you use for proofing your yeast) in your bread with another liquid (like beer) without any ill effects or would it get too beery as it ferments?

I ask because I made a beer-rye but maybe because of the beer I used not being strong enough, I didn't taste much of the beer flavor coming through the final loaf - although I still liked it more, flavor-wise, than some other breads I have made. I want to try making another beer-rye loaf, but I also want to make this bread and thought I might combine the two ideas.

I planned on halving that recipe (since this is an experiment), and incorporating a levain built from a rye mother starter that I have rather than using the "fermented white dough" that that recipe calls for (which seems to be emulating a sourdough levain anyway).

This is the recipe I plan on using, after I alter it. I was just wondering if there is anything in it that stands out as being a horrible idea that would end in catastrophe or make the bread not rise.

For the Levain:
90g Bread Flour
60 g Water
20g 100% Hydration Rye Starter - (Taking 10 grams off of both the flour and water so that I don't mess up the ratio of the final dough.)
The recipe says to leave the "fermented white dough" at room temperature for 24 hours or 48 in the fridge, I would let the levain sit out for about 12 hours or until it passes the float test.
For the Final Dough:
200g Rye Flour
60g Bread Flour
170g Levain
7g Salt - (The original "fermented starter" called for salt, but I would add it in the final dough trather than the levain.)
205g Beer
1/2tsp Caraway Seeds
1/2 tsp Espresso Powder

The directions call for mixing it 8-10 minutes, rolling it into a ball and letting it rest an hour - then folding it and letting it rest an hour twice, shaping it and letting it rise an hour and a half. I was basically going to just follow the directions of the original recipe.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Jan 26, 2013 around 06:00

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


How come my sourdough dough is always more slack than other doughs I make? I can knead it a lot, then stretch and fold it a few times as per the recipe, and it will have a nice windowpane and actually be more smooth and supple than any other doughs, but it never holds it's shape and always sags out to become real flat. I improvise a couche (or however it's spelled) by placing a sheet of parchment paper and just then putting a box of aluminum foil on each side to roll up the edges and keep the final shape, but is it like because maybe the pH is too high, and the acid is breaking down the gluten or something? It has always been this way every time I make sourdough. Maybe this is why they always use proofing baskets?

Edit: It is, in part, a rye starter. I made an all-rye starter, and then made a separate, rye-wheat starter from that, which I use as my main mother starter to make levains and whatever other preferments a recipe might call for. I know rye has some enzyme which does break down gluten or something, but I am using this recipe which has rye flour in it and theirs looks fine. I did substitute wheat for rye flour in that recipe, but I added enough extra flour to make a tacky-but-not-sticky dough, and even then, my sourdough doughs have always been this way. I just want my breads to look nice like the ones in the pictures. vv

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Aug 17, 2013 around 21:02

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


TenKindsOfCrazy posted:

I may just make up my own based on my favourite white bread recipe.

That's basically what that recipe is. I helped my sister make the chocolate bread from this page and it came out fine. I measured with volume, even.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Oct 29, 2013 around 23:24

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Can anybody tell me about focaccia? As far as I conceive of it, all bread is all bread, the biggest difference apart from ingredients is hydration and how it is kneaded. I am trying to recreate this focaccia I had a long time ago at an Italian restaurant in my town. I want to say it was fairly tall but with a super cavernous open crumb, you would tear a piece in half and it would have these "peaks and valleys" in the crumb and when you dipped it in oil, the peaks would soak up the oil so it wouldn't get too oily and it was great. It may have been like a soft ciabatta or something, but it had a yellow cast hue, and was decently chewy and didn't have a crust at all. The crumb structure makes me think it was a sourdough or had a really long, undisturbed rising period.

All that said, couldn't I just take a formula that already has a high hydration, maybe up the hydration a bit more to like 80%, stretch and fold it 1 or 2 times over a couple hours bulk ferment, then throw it in a pan, stretch it out to the size of the pan and then just let it rise in the fridge over night? I was looking at maybe tweaking the Tartine English muffin formula, which is itself a baguette dough that you do just knead a few times, stretch out and let rise before cutting the muffins and cooking them. I've only made focaccia once before, and it was maybe the second bread I tried and it was a Rachael Ray recipe with like 1 tablespoon of salt to maybe 4 or 5 cups of bread flour and maybe 1 1/2 cups of water or something, so in addition to being incredibly salty it was kind of dry and crumbly. So I'm not an expert at focaccia which is why I've come to you, bread thread.

EDIT: It looked a bit like this but without the crust.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Dec 2, 2013 around 07:46

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


The Doctor posted:

If there has to be a reason for a long last rise for me it's because I like to guarantee the bread will pop when it goes into the oven. I hate when you punch something down and it doesn't rise when it goes in the oven.

I read somewhere that rye actually doesn't even benefit from being punched down, and actually works better if you either don't punch it down at all or de-gas it less aggressively. That might only be with straight or high-percentage rye doughs, though. I also don't know if there's any truth to it, because I don't often make rye breads. Has anybody else heard that? I have been reading some books I checked out form the library and think it might have been either the Bouchon cookbook or the La Brea Breads cookbook.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Jan 3, 2014 around 01:59

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Grrl Anachronism posted:

What can I do to keep my challah from splitting apart on top? I feel like it ruins the presentation of the braids, but otherwise I am totally happy with it.


Maybe let it proof a bit longer? I think usually when bread explodes dramatically when you cook it, the problem is that it's underproofed. You could also be shaping it improperly, but since it's braided I doubt it's lacking tension. It just looks a li'l bit saggy, but it's probably the picture since the top appears to be trying to escape.

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Stefan Prodan posted:

I think making bread might be the hardest thing I've ever tried to do. I have no idea why but I just can't knead bread into anything that comes out like what I would get at a bakery or pictured in the OP at all.

I bought the book that a guy who runs a local bakery wrote which has good reviews on amazon (and his bread is amazing) and followed the recipe while measuring my ingredients to the gram and never was able to get the dough to stop being too sticky to knead on the counter. It would either just stick to my hands or stick to the counter and every time that I had to pull it off one or the other I felt like I was like just kinda ruining whatever smooth consistency the dough had.
Regarding this, flour does have different qualities, I think things like protein amount will determine how "wet" a dough will feel. So you could have two bread flours that end up with different products. It does have to do with how well kneaded the dough is, as well. Every wet dough i've made, I've done in a stand mixer, and it sometimes will stick to the sides of the bowl when I am first kneading, but after a while it will peel off. The more you knead it, the more cohesive a mass of dough will get. I think the autolyse step helps with that as well.

I've never been able to do what Forkish says in the book Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast , that was mentioned in an earlier post, for what it's worth.

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Rurutia posted:

I actually read an article awhile ago that said the yeasts we grow in our starters come from the flour that we use. That's why using a stone milled flour is best or something like that. SO you might want to just change what flour you use.

Yeah yeast is just a fungus that grows on organic poo poo. I actually used the yeast-water method to jumpstart my own starter. If you put raisins in water and soak them for like a week, shaking the jar every so often every day, you will eventually end up with something that is fizzy and smells like juicy juice. If you add that to some flour, you have "sourdough" starter and you can just use the rest of the yeast-water to feed it, then wean it off into just regular water. I've kept a starter going for a couple of years from that, and made other types of starters, using it as a "mother starter". Also I'm not dead yet so it probably isn't killing me.

The downside to that is that my starter can smell sour, but I don't really get that much of a sour tang to it -- which is fine since I'm not the biggest fan of super "sour" sourdough.

therattle posted:

Unbleached. Rye is often recommended; I guess it has high yeast content. Mmm... Yeasty as a baker's gusset.

I think they suggest wheat or rye because it has more of the bran and germ mixed into the flour (the outer "skin" of the kernel, which is what the yeast would grow on), while "white" flour has most of that sifted out.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2014 around 16:29

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Oh man I made a modified Tartine bread the other day, I loving love that formula. I have problems with shaping, especially into things other than boules, but when you get it right, it's so good - mine has a really nice parmesan-sharp cheddar aroma to it, it really reminds me of Cheez-its, actually, they have this mild sort of salty tang to them. I do kind of hate how most it is though, because maybe my knife isn't sharp enough to effectively cut the crust once it has cooled off--it becomes a bit leathery, and I have to let the bread stale enough to cut it without getting wonky but I think that's the point of Tartine's high hydration. It does make it really good for toast! The inside is light and fluffy and the outside is crispy and flaky.

I posted these to another bread forum but I love how the bread turns out so I'm posting them here, too.

Could someone explain to me what autolysing is actually doing, though? Why do recipes call for it - I read that "it develops the gluten so you don't have to knead as much" but I haven't seen any drastically different results when I try it versus when I don't. I try it every now and then, using all the flour and water called for in the recipe, but then the next day the autolysed flour and water might be kind of tough, or too cohesive to effectively fold in or mix in the starter or levain (this may have been one recipe I was using which was kind of low hydration and relying on soaked seeds and starter for the rest of it). I've started doing this thing where I autolyse an equal amount of water to however much whole grain flour I'm using, and then add that to the rest of the flour and water alongside the starter, but I don't know if it's actually doing anything to my breads.

Devoyniche fucked around with this message at Mar 22, 2015 around 16:48

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Oh man so I smoked some turkey and ham for Christmas, then used the smoked ham bones to make a rich pork stock and used that to cook some black eyed peas for New Years, and since you cant have beans without corn bread I made some sourdough cornbread using this recipe I found on google.

http://emerils.com/125741/sourdough-cornbread

Im in soul food heaven. Beans, smoked ham, corn bread and some collard greens from the garden? It's amazing. But I wanted to give a thumbs up for this corn bread recipe too. I left out the sugar because I dont like sweet corn bread. You use the sourdough for flavor rather than leavening, I didnt want it super tangy though so I used mine relatively young, just a few hours after it peaked but before it got too sour smelling.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply