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FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


I make my bread in a loaf pan that I put inside my Dutch oven with a couple ice cubes for steam and oven spring. It's pretty good but the Dutch oven isn't really that tall and sometimes when I have an especially puffy loaf the top of the loaf hits the bottom of the Dutch oven lid. Is there like a long, tall, heavy oval cooking unit anyone knows about? I've seen oval Dutch ovens but I don think they are any taller...

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FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Yeah. That seems about right. Too bad it's in moon dollars from crumpet land. I'll see if I can find something like that in the real world.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Is Costco bread flour any good? My wife and I got a Costco membership mostly for baby formula but I try to use it for other things when I can. It's like a 50lb bag for 15 bucks, I generally buy 5 lb bags of KA at the store for like 3.79 so it's less than half price. I do like KA a lot though.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


The flavor of the fruit if you use something like raisins, will not carry over into the bread on a starter, for a bunch of reasons, but mainly because you aren't actually doing anything with the fruit, just the water, and as you grow your starter there will be less and less of that water in the starter as time goes on. After a week of prepping your starter there is only going to be a tiny amount of raisin water still in the starter.

Using fruit just helps you accumulate yeast to build a good starter.

Its really not hard at all to make sourdough it just takes maintenance, and in some ways, a schedule. I mean, if you don't make at least a loaf of bread a week with it (or something else, like pretzels or pancakes or pizza) you'll just be wasting flour.

aldantefax posted:

I have questions about starter. I was reading through Tartine and when you're preparing the leaven you take about 20% of your starter and discard the remaining 80%? Can you do anything with that remaining 80%, or is it basically intended to be thrown out?

I've never thrown out that much starter, that seems excessively wasteful. You need some starter to keep your starter going but any other amount of starter you 'throw out' could instead be used to cook something obviously. (once you get your starter going I mean, the first week or so you'll probably be throwing starter out because you can't do anything with it until its fully healthy)

Generally what I do is I keep some fed starter in a mason jar in my fridge. When I'm going to use it I put it in a big bowl on my counter and let it come to room temp, then I feed it, then I use that to make stuff and put whatever is left over back in the mason jar.

FishBulb fucked around with this message at Nov 17, 2012 around 16:49

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


therattle posted:

Ah, I've been wanting to make focaccia with durum 00 wheat; fine grind, high protein. I love the idea of using steeped oil in it.

Do any of you sift your flour for bread? I do for other baking, but not bread baking.

I have done it in the past because I assumed I was supposed to but it didn't seem to make much of a difference so I stopped.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


My wife bought me a Pullman loaf pan for Christmas and its kinda nifty. It has a lid that slides onto it and bakes essentially square loaves with a very soft crust so its great for sandwhich loaf (which having school aged kids i go through a lot of) It's kinda an odd size so my old loaf recipes don't really "fill" it properly so I've been using the ones that came with the pan with good results but I'm not sure how to make potato bread or sourdough with it. Anyone have any suggestions or experience with this thing?

Not that I mind just experimenting myself until I figure it out.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


therattle posted:

Can't you just scale up the volume of your doughs to fill it? Measure respective tin volumes using water.

Well that was my initial plan but I wasn't sure how to measure the volume. The problem is that normally a loaf overlfows a pan but with the box loaf it's contained.

I guess I could make a loaf in both pans with the recipies I use and weigh them after everything is done or cooked and scale from there.

The recipie I've been using for the new pan isn't by weight though and has stuff like milk and shortening I don't usually put in my loaves (although I guess I could weigh everything in it, but this isn't maths class!)

I've been doing what I've been doing for so long ice started to take everything for granted and I've forgotten some of the basics like hydration percentages and what ingridients do to loaves

Edit: I think all breads make good french toast the real secret is to let the bread stale up a bit so it really absorbs the french toast custard and to not use any egg whites in your custard.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Does anyone have a solid recipie that will make me a reasonable amount of yeast donuts for a family?

By weight would be preferred. I've found a few online but they tend to be tremendously large, or by volume.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


So after seeing a thing online linked in post in this forum about 'cronuts' (just google it if you want to read it I guess) a couple weeks ago I decided to make them*

Basically a chef in New York is selling these croissant/donut hybrids for 5 dollars a pop and of course like all other trendy foods people are nuts for them, but I wanted to do it myself. I've never made croissants before, or any laminated dough so I was kinda apprehensive about it but anyways here are some pictures if anyone has a sweet tooth like me (I took pictures of the entire process but things getting mixed and folded are boring so here are just the ones from the end).

Tasty layers


After cutting them


After frying them


After filling, sugaring and glazing them


Crumbshot



*I actually made a laminated brioche dough instead of a true croissant dough. The chef in the article says that he had to try a bunch of recipies before one worked, I can't imagine that a straight croissant would stand up to frying very well, so I went with this, if I ever try it again I'll make them a little lighter and see how it changes. Still, close enough for me.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


I have one of this plastic "lock n lid" boxes that's large enough for a loaf of bread and I just put it in there after its cooled. Bread never lasts long enough to go bad around here though.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


I used to keep mine in the fridge and feed it like once a week.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


therattle posted:

Thanks. I've tried that and it's been quite sour. Any tips? How do you build it prior to baking?

I'm not sure if I have tips to unsour it sadly, I always found it to be not quite as sour as I'd like it really My general policy was to dump the mason jar into a large bowl, add a feeding, wait for it to work a bit and warm up (cold starter doesn't do much) and the use what I need for a recipe and return the rest of the bowl to the mason jar.

Sadly I don't currently have a mother going though. I might try start one again eventually, just got added to the list of things I gave up when I had another kid.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


What's wrong with your guys mother tops? After draining the liquid I've never scraped anything.

Am I going to die?

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


How do I make pita with a good pocket in it? I think I might be making it too thin before I cook it? Any suggestions or secrets?

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


I don't have sodium citrate

That's almost exactly the recipie I used minus the dough improver/citrate so I guess I'll just try again.

FishBulb fucked around with this message at Oct 18, 2013 around 21:26

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FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

On a similar note, are there any decent yeast free recipes? I'm just learning and want to keep in practice but I have to stay away from yeast for a while.

Why?

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