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Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Garrand posted:

I guess I'm just live posting my experiences now. Anyway



(The answer they are looking for is 256)

The problem with this is that the question is not the same as what the response suggests. The question asks 'What is the highest decimal value for a single byte?' Well, the highest 'value' is 255.
Then the response says that there are '256 possible values', which is a totally different point. And those values reach from 0 to 255, still making 255 the correct answer.

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Alpha Mayo
Jan 15, 2007

You can't kill the Bitcoin.
The Bitcoin will live on.

I tried to kill the Bitcoin.
BUT I FAILED! As I was smite to the ground.


Ugh my dumb A+ is about to expire in 4 months and I feel obligated to keep it for some stupid reason (probably because I spent $700 on it). Guessing my best bet is to just take Network+? That is just one exam, right?
Other option is Security+. Not sure which is better to have a on a resume today, or if I should maybe even consider getting both. I've been slacking on my certificates.

ErIog
Jul 11, 2001



Peanut Butler posted:

Apologies if this has been retread over and over through years of this thread (or even in the last few pages, haha), but I'm 35, haven't worked in IT since 2002 (as a bottom-rung housecall support tech), and I'm getting sick of the no-future retail/service work I put myself through during the day while doing hobby-level and odd-job computer touching/repair/refurbs at night

Will a company or public-sector org even consider hiring someone new to the industry who is ~10 years older than other entry-level schmucks?
again sorry if this is the billionth retread of this question; compthanks in compadvance

The key thing, in my experience, is that your certs precede you. If you can defend your certs during interview (like you know your poo poo) then nobody's going to bat an eye that your work record doesn't quite line up. If you've been doing any computer-related stuff in your previous jobs it's very easy to write the description in a way that highlights those things. It's very easy to talk about those things in an interview in a way that lines up with whatever you're applying for. Even if you haven't it's really enough that you can explain what certs you've gotten and why you've gotten them.

In fact, not being a test-dumped cert robot and having experience in other areas is probably a big plus because it shows you can communicate with humans. You think these things are a liability, but they're really not. Go get the certs, learn the material, and you'll probably be just fine. You think you're new to the industry because you've been away for a while, but there's no reason to view it like that. You already know the basic stuff. If you can add some specialized skills on top of that(and can describe them well during interviews) then you're in a pretty good position.

ErIog fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2018 around 11:57

Oyster
Nov 11, 2005

I GOT FLAT FEET JUST LIKE MY HERO MEGAMAN


Alpha Mayo posted:

Ugh my dumb A+ is about to expire in 4 months and I feel obligated to keep it for some stupid reason (probably because I spent $700 on it). Guessing my best bet is to just take Network+? That is just one exam, right?
Other option is Security+. Not sure which is better to have a on a resume today, or if I should maybe even consider getting both. I've been slacking on my certificates.

I passed the Security+ yesterday and was EXTREMELY DISAPPOINTED in the total lack of any mention of War Driving, War Chalking, Vishing, Smishing, War Ballooning, or any other stupid terminology. The best I got was bluesnarfing. I passed the Network+ last month and that one required much more application as opposed to rote memorization - subnetting, switch configuration, all that was on it.

Looking at jobs the past couple months I've seen a lot more requiring or requesting Security+ than Network+, probably because any interface with the DoD requires it.

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

Oyster posted:

I passed the Security+ yesterday and was EXTREMELY DISAPPOINTED in the total lack of any mention of War Driving, War Chalking, Vishing, Smishing, War Ballooning, or any other stupid terminology. The best I got was bluesnarfing. I passed the Network+ last month and that one required much more application as opposed to rote memorization - subnetting, switch configuration, all that was on it.

Looking at jobs the past couple months I've seen a lot more requiring or requesting Security+ than Network+, probably because any interface with the DoD requires it.

The whole industry is moving towards a security focus. I've seen so many network engineer roles that are now classified as "network security engineer". Companies want their network guys to config the firewalls too, and everybody is pouring money into cybersecurity, so they want network guys to have security certs over network certs.

I tell recruiters I have a CCNA Route and Switch and they don't care, i tell them I have CCNA Security and Security+ and they want to throw me at all sorts of roles.

MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Defenestrategy posted:

Whats a cysa+ supposed to be about?

In addition to the Cysa+ can you also get the Blyat+?

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Oyster posted:

I passed the Security+ yesterday and was EXTREMELY DISAPPOINTED in the total lack of any mention of War Driving, War Chalking, Vishing, Smishing, War Ballooning, or any other stupid terminology. The best I got was bluesnarfing. I passed the Network+ last month and that one required much more application as opposed to rote memorization - subnetting, switch configuration, all that was on it.

Looking at jobs the past couple months I've seen a lot more requiring or requesting Security+ than Network+, probably because any interface with the DoD requires it.

Bluesnarfing.
Edit: I'm honestly glad to hear the Sec+ got better, maybe mine will be more valuable now.

Oyster
Nov 11, 2005

I GOT FLAT FEET JUST LIKE MY HERO MEGAMAN


I've gotten three certs in the past three months - A+, Network+, and Security+. I've been waffling between Server+ next or the ICND1. First I was leaning towards the ICND1, but looking at CompTIA's security offerings and stackable tracks it really seems like it might actually be worth something. My experience thus far has been that no one cares about the A+, too many people care about the Security+, and I learned the most with the Network+.

Which one seems to have more value? I'm leaning towards CCENT followed by CCNA, but if the CySA+/CASP track is worth as much as it sounds that may change.

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Last I checked(and admittedly, it has been a few years), Server+ was garbage even for a CompTIA certification. It is basically worthless.(I also have A+/Net+/Sec+)
However, ICND1 is 1/2 to a CCNA and will teach you more about networking then you ever imagined.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002



Unless it's required for the job (Sec+) any toss up between a Cisco cert and a CompTIA cert always comes up Cisco.

I think the ICND1 is even cheaper than a CompTIA.

vyst
Aug 25, 2009


How difficult are the aws exams? I've been using aws on a large Enterprise for a while but you never know how that will translate

CHEF!!!
Feb 22, 2001



vyst posted:

How difficult are the aws exams? I've been using aws on a large Enterprise for a while but you never know how that will translate

Preface: I got my Certified Solutions Architect: Associate cert in late Nov. 2017 and my Certified SysOps Administrator: Associate cert New Year's Eve Day, 2017.

Depends on your definition of "a while." I've been using it for five years, sometimes more stringently than at other positions, and I found the first cert mentioned to be quite easy. It goes over pretty much everything at a fairly high level. EC2 instances, EBS vs. ephemeral storage (Durrrrr), RDS and the types of database engines you can use, VPCs, security groups, Network ACLs, Cloudwatch, ELBs, etc. The second one is definitely the hardest of the three Associate-level certs. If you can't make custom VPCs, explain ideal auto-scaling setups based on different scenarios (cost cutting, failover availability across multiple AZs, etc.), and how to auto-age-out backups from S3 to Glacier while drunk and blindfolded, you won't pass. But it's my understanding that there's about 500 questions and they are randomly assigned out of the 55 or however many it was so your mileage may vary. They also updated the tests literally a day or two after I took my SysOps exam, which were in beta at the time but results would not be known for weeks or months instead of instantly, so I opted not to take those.

I setup a new AWS account, bought some dirt-cheap video tutorials from ACloudGuru via Udemy, followed them while taking fastidious notes and going through what was being demonstrated, not merely watching, and that did the trick. Now I'm doing the same for an RHCSA cert. Once I'm done with that, I might get the Developer Associate, just to have all three, or maybe I'll move on to the Professional-level versions of the two I mentioned, which I understand to be much harder.

If you have any other questions, ask away. I also have an 82-page MS Word document of my notes for the Solutions Architect video training that some people might be interested in...

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


Sounds like my employer has caught the same bug everyone else's has and they are keen on me getting the Security+, which is fine by me since they are paying and my A+/Net+ are expiring soon. I feel the same senseless attachment to them as well.

I used the All-in-one books for A+/Net+ years ago and felt they were sufficient for both, is the All-in-one still good enough for the Sec+, or is there some new hotness? For people who have taken it recently, how does the difficulty compare with the Net+?

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010


Grimey Drawer

Diva Cupcake posted:

In case you're interested in what looks to be another grab for CompTIA dollars, the new PenTest+ beta is now available. Although I suppose cheaper marginally less scammy alternatives to CEH should be welcomed.

https://certification.comptia.org/c...cations/pentest



Huh, interesting... Just yesterday I found out that I passed the Cloud+ Beta cert I took back in October (), even though the test itself was completely inane and covered absolutely zero of the study material from the official Comptia study book. Fifty bucks is tempting, but I don't think I would do a beta test again, way too much stupid bullshit, I learned basically nothing, and I guarantee the cert is pretty worthless.

OSU_Matthew fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2018 around 14:15

Oyster
Nov 11, 2005

I GOT FLAT FEET JUST LIKE MY HERO MEGAMAN


Adjectivist Philosophy posted:

Sounds like my employer has caught the same bug everyone else's has and they are keen on me getting the Security+, which is fine by me since they are paying and my A+/Net+ are expiring soon. I feel the same senseless attachment to them as well.

I used the All-in-one books for A+/Net+ years ago and felt they were sufficient for both, is the All-in-one still good enough for the Sec+, or is there some new hotness? For people who have taken it recently, how does the difficulty compare with the Net+?

I can't speak for the all-in-one since I didn't even know of it's existence, but I think the Sec+ was mostly inane memorization poo poo. The Net+ had much more application on it, and I learned the most from it. Sec+ was mostly memorizing what is administrative/technical/physical, what recommended specs are, what the incident recovery process is, etc. My practice tests covered smishing/vishing/war chalking/all that, but the closest my actual test came to that was bluesnarfing, which was also covered in my Net+ material. Keep in mind that the 04 will be retired in July, and that's what I took last week, so things might be changing.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!



Adjectivist Philosophy posted:

Sounds like my employer has caught the same bug everyone else's has and they are keen on me getting the Security+, which is fine by me since they are paying and my A+/Net+ are expiring soon. I feel the same senseless attachment to them as well.

I used the All-in-one books for A+/Net+ years ago and felt they were sufficient for both, is the All-in-one still good enough for the Sec+, or is there some new hotness? For people who have taken it recently, how does the difficulty compare with the Net+?

I'm working on Sec+ starting tomorrow and everyone says the Gibson book is the one to get. Kindle version is only $10
https://www.amazon.com/CompTIA-Secu.../dp/1939136024/

He has additional training material on his site with practice exams and simulations as well.
http://getcertifiedgetahead.com/ind...curity-sy0-401/

You have until July to test for 401, otherwise you'll need to study for 501.

Actuarial Fables
Jul 29, 2014



Nap Ghost

After a few weather cancellations, I finally was able to take the CCNA exam (again).

Passed it, too!

The Boson practice tests were a big help, as was the 31 Days Before Your CCNA Exam book, so thanks again for the recommendations. Now I just need to get out of helpdesk...

MrKatharsis
Nov 29, 2003

feel the bern

CHEF!!! posted:

If you have any other questions, ask away. I also have an 82-page MS Word document of my notes for the Solutions Architect video training that some people might be interested in...

Interested. I'm working through this course right now on Udemy. The 15-20 minute video segments are a struggle with my attention span. I do a lot better on courses with 4-8 minute videos.

vyst
Aug 25, 2009


CHEF!!! posted:


If you have any other questions, ask away. I also have an 82-page MS Word document of my notes for the Solutions Architect video training that some people might be interested in...

I would happily take that word document if you want to send it my way... jtwortley at gmail dot com

Judge Schnoopy
Nov 2, 2005

dont even TRY it, pal

At 82 pages you might as well watch the videos yourself

YOLOsubmarine
Oct 19, 2004

Breaux, Breaux, you seen a defense around here anywhere!?


I passed the AWS certified solutions architect associate exam a while back using the official study guide and practice tests from A Cloud Academy (I did them all during the free 7 days).

It took about two months to prep and I knew basically nothing about AWS prior to taking it. The book does a pretty good job of introducing most concepts you’d need to know and running you through labs on them. Supplement with white papers on things that don’t quite stick and you’ll be fine.

The exam is very focused on core services so while there are questions on things like opsworks and elastic beanstalk and so on, if you know EC2, S3, EBS, cloudwatch and VPC pretty well you should be able to pass.

YOLOsubmarine fucked around with this message at Feb 14, 2018 around 18:36

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my bitter bi rival
Mar 21, 2011


not sure if this is the right place for this but I'm trying to get my company to pony up for SANS 401 and they are open to the idea but are busting my balls about the price of it. Mostly, they want to know if there's a class of similar quality that is available for cheaper. Do you guys have any recommendations for similar classes? I just need to take something to them shows I did DD about other options, and I am angling to go SEC401 anyways.

It seems like ISC2 CBK is kind of loosely similar in difficulty level at about half the cost, but it seems much more conceptual/managerial and a lot less hands on based on my research. Any advice for online instructor-led security classes that are similar in scope/quality to SANS? This is mostly about the experience of the class and coming away with some useful skills, a cert isn't that important.

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