Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«277 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



Well, yeah, you need to spend a little time trying, at least Googling the problem, to see if it's a simple-ish issue. There's a balance to be struck.
Sure is fun telling people who ask me about issues with their home computers "I don't know, I'd just back up and reimage," though.
the best is telling people who ask for recommendations on what to buy "whatever Purchasing and your Manager will buy for you." Like, I don't know or care any more. My personal system (a Mac) is 7 years old now, fer cryin' out loud. I dunno, pick a screen size, and just an i-something with as much RAM and hard drive as you can afford. You won't be happy with it regardless - you're a user and will gently caress it up somehow. (I may be jaded.)

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Alpha Mayo
Jan 15, 2007
hi how are you?
there was this racist piece of shit in your av so I fixed it
you're welcome
pay it forward~

Does Microsoft still have a windows desktop management certificate? Or should I just bite the bullet and go for Server 2016? Though I don't even know if test sites are open right now, it might be a better use of my time during quarantine than playing guild wars 2 all day.

ElGroucho
Nov 1, 2005

We already - What about sticking our middle fingers up... That was insane


Fun Shoe

Everytime I think about getting an MS certificate, they change the system or retire it, so I've pretty much given up on the notion.

Alpha Mayo
Jan 15, 2007
hi how are you?
there was this racist piece of shit in your av so I fixed it
you're welcome
pay it forward~

ElGroucho posted:

Everytime I think about getting an MS certificate, they change the system or retire it, so I've pretty much given up on the notion.

Yeah that's why I haven't got one yet. Every time I check they've completely changed their entire system. Looks like they are retiring their MCSA/MCSE system too and changing everything to 'role-based' and all have Cloud names.. I think the modern desktop administation one would be this:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/le...-modern-desktop
but "Microsoft 365 Certified: Modern Desktop Administrator Associate" isn't going to hit on any resume scanning systems any time soon the same way "MCSE/MCSA" does, though it would hit for Microsoft + Office 365 so maybe that's why they name it like that. And it isn't that expensive (2 exams, $165 each).

Maybe I'll just go for Network+.

8 Ball
Nov 27, 2010

My hands are all messed up so you better post, brother.


College Slice

Is it worth paying for an A+ course that includes practice exams or am I better off just getting a book / using Pluralsight? I'd say my general IT knowledge is solid

snackcakes
May 7, 2005

A joint venture of Matsumura Fishworks and Tamaribuchi Heavy Manufacturing Concern


Yam Slacker

Anyone know how Microsoft Competencies work with regard to a company getting benefits from their employees completing certifications?

I'm specifically looking at this Cloud Competency: https://partner.microsoft.com/en-us...form-competency

It lists Microsoft Certified: Azure Administrator Associate, which I got through the AZ-103 exam. Now it seems like it doesn't count because it's been replaced by AZ-104 even though my certification is still valid.

I want to go for AZ-300 and AZ-301 next, but they're set to retire in September. I don't see much of a reason to bother (aside from the learning/resume boost) if we won't get a benefit from this

Neo_Crimson
Aug 15, 2011

"Is that your final dandy?"

I took the Network+ exam today and failed pretty hard (614 vs 720 needed to pass). I've been working at this for the last few months and feeling pretty frustrated now. Any advice on how to prepare better? I've been using that Sybex program that was on sale at Humble Bundle a few months ago + some practice exams. Someone mentioned a network simulator earlier in the thread, are there any other resources people would recommend?

I passed Security+ last year and it took way less effort than this...

Slumpy
Jun 10, 2008



8 Ball posted:

Is it worth paying for an A+ course that includes practice exams or am I better off just getting a book / using Pluralsight? I'd say my general IT knowledge is solid

You'll just have to memorize really stupid poo poo like how many pins are on a stick of RAM. I'd do the A+ messer videos at 2 x speed for stuff you dont know 100% and you'd probably be fine after that

Richard Cabeza
Mar 1, 2005

What a dickhead...

Just passed the CISSP. Never took a test I was so sure I crashed and burned on.

AlternateAccount
Apr 25, 2005
FYGM

Richard Cabeza posted:

Just passed the CISSP. Never took a test I was so sure I crashed and burned on.

How many questions did it take you?

The Iron Rose
May 12, 2012

Cat Army


Writing the GCP professional cloud architect exam tomorrow. Any advice? Particularly re case studies.

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...


Neo_Crimson posted:

I took the Network+ exam today and failed pretty hard (614 vs 720 needed to pass). I've been working at this for the last few months and feeling pretty frustrated now. Any advice on how to prepare better? I've been using that Sybex program that was on sale at Humble Bundle a few months ago + some practice exams. Someone mentioned a network simulator earlier in the thread, are there any other resources people would recommend?

I passed Security+ last year and it took way less effort than this...
The Net+ was my toughest one too, A+ and Sec+ felt way less stressful. The Net+ just covers so much material.

What worked for me was:
  • buying a book (Mike Meyers Network+) and reading through it twice, taking notes the whole time (doesn't matter if you ever read them again or not, just writing something down [not typing] really helps memory. I filled up almost an entire 180 page notebook with Net+ study material)
  • watching the video series that complements the book (Udemy has sales on that video course all the time)
  • watching any other video series I could find and focusing on the parts I'm having trouble memorizing (Professor Messer has a whole free series on the N+ I believe)
  • buying practice exams and taking those over and over again until I got >90% consistently without memorizing the questions (Mike Meyers has a nice exam simulator that's pricey but comes with lots of practice questions)
  • taking whatever free online practice tests I could find to supplement
Basically I threw time and money at it, and did lots of practice tests, writing down every wrong answer. I get really nervous about tests I have to pay for and tend to overprepare, it worked for this one though as I still just barely passed.

e: also did this, I'm a terrible passive learner and have to be doing something while studying or I'll retain nothing

RightClickSaveAs fucked around with this message at 21:59 on May 10, 2020

Diva Cupcake
Aug 15, 2005



lol the CISSP is now recognized as equivalent to a Masters degree in the UK.

https://twitter.com/dcuthbert/statu...301434735800320

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

I had it before, so I'm not really bouncing off the walls in celebration, but I earned my Sec+ today.

That gives me all of my employer-mandated (and paid for, with training time allotted for, so I'm not complaining) certifications: A+/N+/S+ and Windows 10 MCSA.

Debating studying for the MD-101 so I can get the newish Microsoft 365: Modern Desktop Administrator Associate certification, Server 2016 MCSA, or AWS. Looks like there's actually study materials for MD-101 available now, can't imagine that would take a TON of effort.

Vintimus Prime
Apr 24, 2008

DERRRRRPPP what are picture threads for????


The Iron Rose posted:

Writing the GCP professional cloud architect exam tomorrow. Any advice? Particularly re case studies.

Dang just saw this. I took the test back in February and passed. How did you do?

Dandywalken
Feb 11, 2014

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation. I actually named my daughter after the Pink ranger and will provide proof if challenged.


Hopefully posted to the appropriate thread this time!

So I'm semi regretting my career choice to do medical coding and billing, and a friend suggested I look into a CCNA and get Packet tracer to lab out scenarios. What books would you all recommend for CCNA prep? I was provided with some for Net+ certification and I imagine theres some overlap there.

The Iron Rose
May 12, 2012

Cat Army


Vintimus Prime posted:

Dang just saw this. I took the test back in February and passed. How did you do?

I postponed it till the end of the month actually! I was only getting around 70% in my practice tests which convinced me that a week of prep would not in fact cut it.

Vintimus Prime
Apr 24, 2008

DERRRRRPPP what are picture threads for????


The Iron Rose posted:

I postponed it till the end of the month actually! I was only getting around 70% in my practice tests which convinced me that a week of prep would not in fact cut it.

I would say know those case studies backwards and forwards. You will be able to read them during the test so you donít have to memorize. If you can understand what each client is going for, and have a good grasp on lift/shift & cloud optimization youíll do fine. With that said, it definitely was not an easy exam

Jedi425
Dec 6, 2002

THOU ART THEE ART THOU STICK YOUR HAND IN THE TV DO IT DO IT DO IT


Dandywalken posted:

Hopefully posted to the appropriate thread this time!

So I'm semi regretting my career choice to do medical coding and billing, and a friend suggested I look into a CCNA and get Packet tracer to lab out scenarios. What books would you all recommend for CCNA prep? I was provided with some for Net+ certification and I imagine theres some overlap there.

I'll throw in the obligatory Lammle recommendation; opinions may vary, but his guide was the one that made CCNA concepts make sense to me.

Also hit up Subnetting Questions for practice once you get stuck in with subnet math.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty



Started studying for CKAD this weekend. Bought the black friday package that hd the training + exam voucher from the linux foundation last year.

Iíve used Kubernetes before but never managed the stack. Always used Terraform to create AWS EKS clusters and wrote pipelines that deploy apps to them.

Any exam tips?

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

Just dipping my toes into learning AWS, and I typically choose a certification to go for when doing so.

Is the AWS Cloud Practitioner worth going for, or should I just skip over it for one of the Associate level certifications? It's looking extremely basic, but I have no first-hand experience with AWS (or cloud in general), so maybe it's worth the time. Employer would pay for the exam in either case.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty



Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Just dipping my toes into learning AWS, and I typically choose a certification to go for when doing so.

Is the AWS Cloud Practitioner worth going for, or should I just skip over it for one of the Associate level certifications? It's looking extremely basic, but I have no first-hand experience with AWS (or cloud in general), so maybe it's worth the time. Employer would pay for the exam in either case.

Itís only about what services are and what features they deliver. More something for a (pre-)sales role that gives you an understanding what services are called and what you use them for.

I did it before my SAA exam as I also had 0 AWS experience. It doesnít add much value but you can use it as a general intro to AWS. The training for it is free and consists of several hours of videos on the AWS training site. You can easily do it in 1 week so if your employer is paying for it, itís nice resume padding.

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

LochNessMonster posted:

Itís only about what services are and what features they deliver. More something for a (pre-)sales role that gives you an understanding what services are called and what you use them for.

I did it before my SAA exam as I also had 0 AWS experience. It doesnít add much value but you can use it as a general intro to AWS. The training for it is free and consists of several hours of videos on the AWS training site. You can easily do it in 1 week so if your employer is paying for it, itís nice resume padding.

Thanks, sounds like it's probably worthwhile for me to devote a bit of time on as a lead-in for the Associate-level certificate(s).

If I can ask, what made you opt for the Architect cert as opposed to SysOps? More related to your current/preferred job duties? I'm just wondering because I'm debating between SysOps and Architect.

air-
Sep 24, 2007

Who will win the greatest battle of them all?


Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Thanks, sounds like it's probably worthwhile for me to devote a bit of time on as a lead-in for the Associate-level certificate(s).

If I can ask, what made you opt for the Architect cert as opposed to SysOps? More related to your current/preferred job duties? I'm just wondering because I'm debating between SysOps and Architect.

Sysop is supposed to be the most difficult of the associate level AWS certs and that's why most people start with SA or dev

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty



Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Thanks, sounds like it's probably worthwhile for me to devote a bit of time on as a lead-in for the Associate-level certificate(s).

If I can ask, what made you opt for the Architect cert as opposed to SysOps? More related to your current/preferred job duties? I'm just wondering because I'm debating between SysOps and Architect.

As I was looking to gain broader knowledge on AWS I chose the wider exam instead of the deeper one. In the end I completely overprepped for SA and went really deep into the subjects for SysOps as well.

Bonzo
Mar 11, 2004

Just like Mama used to make it!


Dinosaur Gum

Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Just dipping my toes into learning AWS, and I typically choose a certification to go for when doing so.

Is the AWS Cloud Practitioner worth going for, or should I just skip over it for one of the Associate level certifications? It's looking extremely basic, but I have no first-hand experience with AWS (or cloud in general), so maybe it's worth the time. Employer would pay for the exam in either case.

How is your networking back ground? If you don't have a good understanding of how subnets, gateways, load balancers, etc work then the Cloud stuff can get confusing. I'd say at least run though it to get a feel for that and storage.

Once you learn it for one, the other two operate the same since everyone is using K8s.

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

Bonzo posted:

How is your networking back ground? If you don't have a good understanding of how subnets, gateways, load balancers, etc work then the Cloud stuff can get confusing. I'd say at least run though it to get a feel for that and storage.

Once you learn it for one, the other two operate the same since everyone is using K8s.

Semi-decent. I was CCNA certified, though it recently expired. I've probably retained enough of the fundamentals to muddle my way through though? Guess I'll see.

dkj
Feb 18, 2009



Iím working towards my N+ right now and recently got my A+.

I have no experience in IT but am trying to make a career change. Iím eventually going to work toward a RHCE, but before that because Iím also new to Linux should I next work on the Linux+, LPIC-E, LPIC-1, or something else?

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...


dkj posted:

Iím working towards my N+ right now and recently got my A+.

I have no experience in IT but am trying to make a career change. Iím eventually going to work toward a RHCE, but before that because Iím also new to Linux should I next work on the Linux+, LPIC-E, LPIC-1, or something else?
I don't think I've ever seen Linux+ or really any other Linux certs listed in job postings and the like. If you want to continue down the CompTIA route, Security+ would be a good next one, then you'll have the holy trinity of HR department wheel greasers.

You should definitely familiarize yourself with Linux because you'll run into it at some point in IT. VMs (VirtualBox is a good free one) and online videos were how I did it. Set up a new install from scratch in all the major distros and just play around.

dkj
Feb 18, 2009



RightClickSaveAs posted:

I don't think I've ever seen Linux+ or really any other Linux certs listed in job postings and the like. If you want to continue down the CompTIA route, Security+ would be a good next one, then you'll have the holy trinity of HR department wheel greasers.

You should definitely familiarize yourself with Linux because you'll run into it at some point in IT. VMs (VirtualBox is a good free one) and online videos were how I did it. Set up a new install from scratch in all the major distros and just play around.

Will the Sec+ make a difference in job searching?

Part of the reason I want to do the certs is to learn Linux a lot better. Iíve set up a few distros and been learning command line and a little scripting. Got a $60 Dell Optiplex Iím going to use to set up a server in the next week or so.

The other part is to resume pad since I have no experience. Was hoping the LPIC-E would be pretty quick and easy. A friend of mine recommended the LPIC-1 over the Linux+. I was assuming they would help prepare me for the RHCE which from what Iíve read is really in demand.

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

dkj posted:

Will the Sec+ make a difference in job searching?

Part of the reason I want to do the certs is to learn Linux a lot better. Iíve set up a few distros and been learning command line and a little scripting. Got a $60 Dell Optiplex Iím going to use to set up a server in the next week or so.

The other part is to resume pad since I have no experience. Was hoping the LPIC-E would be pretty quick and easy. A friend of mine recommended the LPIC-1 over the Linux+. I was assuming they would help prepare me for the RHCE which from what Iíve read is really in demand.

1) Re: Sec+ - potentially, yes. Security+ is a Department of Defense Approved 8570 baseline certification which means a lot of firms that do business with the federal government require it of their contractors. And apart from those employers, there's a big trickle-down effect resulting in a lot of entry and early/mid-level positions wanting or requiring it (especially in local/state government, and mid to large-sized firms), often in situations where it doesn't make much sense , but that's how it is.

2) Learning Linux is a very good idea, and following a structured study plan certainly helps. No harm and looking at it, though you might stop and consider whether it's actually worth the money to take the exam. Similar to RightClicKSaveAs, I've only seen it mentioned VERY rarely, and only as a nice-to-have, in job postings. Just do a search on linkedin or indeed and see what comes up for your area. If the cost isn't a big concern for you, go for it.

3) Yes, RHCE is something you'll see more often and is smart to look at. Most positions seeking RHCE are going to want some experience with it though. You don't want to get "over certified" before getting an IT position - something to consider.

Honestly I don't know that much about Linux certifications (or Linux in general! It's a blind spot in my skills) but you might look at RHCSA either right after or even instead of looking at Linux+.

Japanese Dating Sim fucked around with this message at 13:26 on May 20, 2020

dkj
Feb 18, 2009



Japanese Dating Sim posted:

1) Re: Sec+ - potentially, yes. Security+ is a Department of Defense Approved 8570 baseline certification which means a lot of firms that do business with the federal government require it of their contractors. And apart from those employers, there's a big trickle-down effect resulting in a lot of entry and early/mid-level positions wanting or requiring it (especially in local/state government, and mid to large-sized firms), often in situations where it doesn't make much sense , but that's how it is.

2) Learning Linux is a very good idea, and following a structured study plan certainly helps. No harm and looking at it, though you might stop and consider whether it's actually worth the money to take the exam. Similar to RightClicKSaveAs, I've only seen it mentioned VERY rarely, and only as a nice-to-have, in job postings. Just do a search on linkedin or indeed and see what comes up for your area. If the cost isn't a big concern for you, go for it.

3) Yes, RHCE is something you'll see more often and is smart to look at. Most positions seeking RHCE are going to want some experience with it though. You don't want to get "over certified" before getting an IT position - something to consider.

Honestly I don't know that much about Linux certifications (or Linux in general! It's a blind spot in my skills) but you might look at RHCSA either right after or even instead of looking at Linux+.

I didnít know that about the Sec+, I probably will go that direction after the N+ then.

Iím surprised ďover-certifiedĒ would be a negative. Iíll look into the RHCSA.

Really appreciate the insight!

Actuarial Fables
Jul 29, 2014



Taco Defender

Speaking of the RHCSA, would I be doing myself a disservice by studying for the older exam based off of RHEL 7? That particular exam is available until October 2020, and the free study material I have access to doesn't have any RHEL 8 material.

Schadenboner
Aug 15, 2011

I MEAN, TURN OFF YOURE MONITOR, MIGTH EXPLAIN YOUR BAD POSTS, HOPE THIS HELPS?!

LochNessMonster posted:

Itís only about what services are and what features they deliver. More something for a (pre-)sales role that gives you an understanding what services are called and what you use them for.

I did it before my SAA exam as I also had 0 AWS experience. It doesnít add much value but you can use it as a general intro to AWS. The training for it is free and consists of several hours of videos on the AWS training site. You can easily do it in 1 week so if your employer is paying for it, itís nice resume padding.

So, in other words something every loving IT manager should take before they go ing-off about but don't because everything is horrible and sucks?

Gnumonic
Dec 11, 2005

Maybe you thought I was the Packard Goose?

I'm planning to transition to a career in InfoSec from a completely unrelated (not-IT-at-all) field (humanities Ph.D). Right now I'm working on Sec+ since it's easy as gently caress, then I'm gonna do network+ just to have it (used to do less-than-ethical things on school computers in HS/college so I'm coming in with some knowledge), but I was wondering if it'd be worth getting CySA+ after that.

Basically I'd like to skip the help-desk level jobs entirely and if that would help me do that I'd consider it worth it. I have a good friend who does incident response and he's helping me learn the actual skills I'd need to do the job, so by the time I'd be applying I should be able to sell myself in an interview fairly well, but he's not super sure what HR screens exist for entry level positions in IR these days.

I'm slow-walking my dissertation to keep getting paid and I have a lease that's not up until the fall in a town where there are no IT jobs (going to move to Seattle when it's up), so I have a bunch of time to work on another certification but not much of an opportunity to develop work experience between now and then. I'm pretty good at teaching myself stuff fast and I'm really good at standardized tests, so if there's anything I should be pursuing after Sec+ and Network+ it'd be good to know it.

Richard Cabeza
Mar 1, 2005

What a dickhead...

AlternateAccount posted:

How many questions did it take you?

drat. sorry for the delay. Took all 150. I thought I knew the material but the questions are murder. Seemed unnecessarily obscure. I did have a bad nightís sleep so maybe that was it. Or maybe Iím dumb.

This is for the CISSP question.

Richard Cabeza fucked around with this message at 01:35 on May 22, 2020

Killer_B
May 22, 2005


Is there a preferred set of recommended practice tests for the latest A+ set of certifications? I'm currently doing most of my work in computer configurations, in spite of the fact that I got hired (contract) without specifically having said cert. (A+)

Also weighing to see if I should get A+ out of the way before completing MD-101...Mostly so I can get hired officially and start to get on track for gaps I'm lacking currently, and begin to focus more on security, if for no other reason that security will continue to be in demand.

Edit : I currently have CCNA (the older routing/switching skillset)

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

Has somebody told you that you have to get an A+? A CCNA is a far more impressive qualification to hold than an A+.

Killer_B
May 22, 2005


Thanks Ants posted:

Has somebody told you that you have to get an A+? A CCNA is a far more impressive qualification to hold than an A+.

A+ more as it relates to the current position itself. (which isn't a completely ignoble reason) Let's just say that the current place I work, has plenty of room to advance beyond computer janitor.

Getting hired, means more potential resources to getting better certs. And perhaps a bit of a better break on costs?

Edit : Or, if not actually getting hired, appearing more advantageous for the next contract?

Killer_B fucked around with this message at 08:35 on May 22, 2020

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Japanese Dating Sim
Nov 12, 2003

hehe

Lipstick Apathy

Generally the only reason to get A+ is to A) earn it prior to getting your foot in the door in IT or B) because it's a requirement at an employer.

But if you want to go for it, assuming you don't have access to paid resources like CBTNuggets, I'd recommend Professor Messer's YouTube series and/or the Mike Meyers book.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«277 »