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Contingency
Jun 2, 2007

MURDERER

Vampire Panties posted:

Just wanted to say - thank you thread for pointing me towards WGU. I'm the proverbial older IT worker who needs to pass some HR screens, and it looks like they're seemingly going to take my 54 credits from community college :toot:

For certification content - anyone pass their CCNP Security? I'm not a security guy, but I need IaT II at a minimum for work, and CCNP Security goes a lot further than Security+.

CCNP Security:
I passed SCOR and am in the middle of studying for SVPN. Everyone knows the traditional CCNP--Cisco stuff, but enough protocol knowledge in there to make you valuable. Totally worthwhile. That's not CCNP Security. The new core exam design is "highlights of every concentration exam in one mega exam." If you happen to work with ISE, Firepower, Umbrella, ESA, and have a time machine to go back to 2017 when you were setting up Anyconnect on ASDM, or would like to work in a pure-Cisco MDR, then CCNP Security is a good fit. Otherwise, studying deployment guides and screenshots of legacy products will not be particularly helpful building your skill set.

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kazmeyer
Jul 26, 2001

'Cause we're the good guys.

So I'm zipping through WGU's Cloud program and approaching the point where I'm going to have to make a decision about which way to go. I think we take one Azure cert and one AWS cert and then have to decide to specialize or go generalist; is the "AWS has more share, but Azure's growing faster" thing still holding true? I know it's not super hard to translate skills from one branch to the other, but if there's any cloud wonks here right now which way would you jump?

Vampire Panties
Apr 18, 2001
nposter
Nap Ghost

Contingency posted:

CCNP Security:
I passed SCOR and am in the middle of studying for SVPN. Everyone knows the traditional CCNP--Cisco stuff, but enough protocol knowledge in there to make you valuable. Totally worthwhile. That's not CCNP Security. The new core exam design is "highlights of every concentration exam in one mega exam." If you happen to work with ISE, Firepower, Umbrella, ESA, and have a time machine to go back to 2017 when you were setting up Anyconnect on ASDM, or would like to work in a pure-Cisco MDR, then CCNP Security is a good fit. Otherwise, studying deployment guides and screenshots of legacy products will not be particularly helpful building your skill set.

Thats my experience renewing my CCNP Collaboration. Lots of very, very specific edge cases for the various specializations. I suppose it makes sense, there aren't a lot of on-premise deployments happening these days, but I'd expect more cloud-based stuff.

Otoh I'd say there's a decent chance that Cisco dumps collab entirely in concessions to MS Teams :jerkbag:

EDIT

also I think it has to do with the main CCNP test now qualifying as the written for the CCIE. Previously the CCIE written was entirely edge cases and minutiae.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty


kazmeyer posted:

So I'm zipping through WGU's Cloud program and approaching the point where I'm going to have to make a decision about which way to go. I think we take one Azure cert and one AWS cert and then have to decide to specialize or go generalist; is the "AWS has more share, but Azure's growing faster" thing still holding true? I know it's not super hard to translate skills from one branch to the other, but if there's any cloud wonks here right now which way would you jump?

Just pick whatever you feel most comfortable with.

Skills for both are overlapping so itís not like youíll be stuck if you pick the ďwrongĒ one.

Renegret
May 26, 2007

THANK YOU FOR CALLING HELP DOG, INC.

YOUR POSITION IN THE QUEUE IS *pbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbt*


Cat Army Sworn Enemy
I'm thinking on trying for a CCNP again to make myself more marketable. My CCNA is expired but I'd rather go the continuing education route and get a new cert rather than just re-do an old one. I passed the CCNP Switch exam back in 2018 but didn't commit to the rest like a dummy. Made the fatal mistake of taking a quick break in between exams, 6 years later I'm still on break. I'm super out of the certification loop right now.

I think my main question right now is regarding the concentration exams. I know I don't need to commit to one yet but I'll do better if I have some sort of game plan in mind. It feels like most of the resources available on the concentrations exams are for the 300-140 ENARSI, but I kinda want to take 300-415 ENSDWI instead. I have a free Percipio subscription through work but Percipio doesn't even have any ENSDWI resources, only for ENARSI and some limited stuff on ENSLD.

Am I going to make my life unnecessarily difficult going for anything other than ENARSI? My main motivation is to make more money so while I'm not committed to the path of least resistance, I also don't want to make things unnecessarily difficult on myself since my free study time is already tight.

Cyks
Mar 17, 2008

The trenches of IT can scar a muppet for life
Itís been 3 1/2 years since Iíve taken my concentration exam and Iíve since let my CCNP certification expire. Things may have changed.

The ENSARI was really popular when it all changed as it was the closest to the TSHOOT replacement, and a lot of training material rebranded over to it.

I took the ENSLD and found it to be extremely easy; easier than my original CCNA in fact, but there was very little training material available back then (there wasnít a book out for it). So I donít think ENSARI is the only reasonable option, but I have no experience with ENSDWI.

(I made a short post itt about ENSLD at the time)

Killer_B
May 23, 2005

Uh?
Is it even remotely worthwhile to get any VM-based (not necessarily cloud/AWS based) certification, outside of satisfying the HR filter?

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty


Killer_B posted:

Is it even remotely worthwhile to get any VM-based (not necessarily cloud/AWS based) certification, outside of satisfying the HR filter?

If you mean VMWare, then Iíd say no since Broadcom is actively killing the brand.

If you mean generic Virtual Machine certs, I have no idea what youíre referring to. I donít think there are VM based cloud certs?

salartarium
Sep 7, 2021
Azure is temporarily giving out free vouchers for their AI certs if you do their Learn Module.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloudskillschallenge/ai/registration/2024#choose-your-challenge

Iíve confirmed you can double dip with the 30 Days to Learn challenge and after you complete the module for the AI cert you can use the 50% voucher on a different exam.

Vampire Panties
Apr 18, 2001
nposter
Nap Ghost

salartarium posted:

Azure is temporarily giving out free vouchers for their AI certs if you do their Learn Module.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloudskillschallenge/ai/registration/2024#choose-your-challenge

Iíve confirmed you can double dip with the 30 Days to Learn challenge and after you complete the module for the AI cert you can use the 50% voucher on a different exam.

So potentially a free AZ-900 cert and 50% off another cert? gently caress yeah thank you!!!! :hfive:

Spoderman
Aug 2, 2004

I currently have senior sysadmin position that pays peanuts and am looking for new work as an IT manager/ project manager. Or barring that, a better paying sysadmin role. I have lots of PM experience in my position, but it's not in my title. All my certifications are Mac-focused (Jamf, ACMT), but my local job market rarely ever has Mac-centric roles posted.

What are some worthwhile certifications that would help me get interviews? I see a lot of postings up my alley mention ITIL. Is that the right move? Just find a local place that offers ITIL courses and certifications? Or is ITIL an equivalent to A+ where it actually doesn't teach much and doesn't open the right doors?

Vampire Panties
Apr 18, 2001
nposter
Nap Ghost

Spoderman posted:

I currently have senior sysadmin position that pays peanuts and am looking for new work as an IT manager/ project manager. Or barring that, a better paying sysadmin role. I have lots of PM experience in my position, but it's not in my title. All my certifications are Mac-focused (Jamf, ACMT), but my local job market rarely ever has Mac-centric roles posted.

What are some worthwhile certifications that would help me get interviews? I see a lot of postings up my alley mention ITIL. Is that the right move? Just find a local place that offers ITIL courses and certifications? Or is ITIL an equivalent to A+ where it actually doesn't teach much and doesn't open the right doors?

PMP and Six Sigma belts seem to be the gold standard in the US, although I believe ITIL is big in Europe? If you have enough projects that you can massage into qualifying for the PMP, I'd highly suggest that

Spoderman
Aug 2, 2004

Vampire Panties posted:

PMP and Six Sigma belts seem to be the gold standard in the US, although I believe ITIL is big in Europe? If you have enough projects that you can massage into qualifying for the PMP, I'd highly suggest that

Thanks! At first I despaired when I saw the requirements to qualify but after reading more closely, I think I stand a fair chance. Appreciate the tip.

Moey
Oct 22, 2010

I LIKE TO MOVE IT

LochNessMonster posted:

If you mean VMWare, then I’d say no since Broadcom is actively killing the brand.

If you mean generic Virtual Machine certs, I have no idea what you’re referring to. I don’t think there are VM based cloud certs?

I'm still tempted to bang out the few additional VMware certs that I was planning on. Not me paying the exam fees + minimal study time needed (at least I assume from skimming the exam guides).

The Iron Rose
May 12, 2012

:minnie: Cat Army :minnie:

Spoderman posted:

I currently have senior sysadmin position that pays peanuts and am looking for new work as an IT manager/ project manager. Or barring that, a better paying sysadmin role. I have lots of PM experience in my position, but it's not in my title. All my certifications are Mac-focused (Jamf, ACMT), but my local job market rarely ever has Mac-centric roles posted.

What are some worthwhile certifications that would help me get interviews? I see a lot of postings up my alley mention ITIL. Is that the right move? Just find a local place that offers ITIL courses and certifications? Or is ITIL an equivalent to A+ where it actually doesn't teach much and doesn't open the right doors?

If you want out of day to day tech bullshit, going the technical project management route is a pretty good approach.

If you want between 2 and 5x the pay using similar skillsets, the journey to the cloud is the way.

Spoderman
Aug 2, 2004

The Iron Rose posted:

If you want out of day to day tech bullshit, going the technical project management route is a pretty good approach.

If you want between 2 and 5x the pay using similar skillsets, the journey to the cloud is the way.

that really is the crossroads iím between. iím tired of the feeling of constantly being behind the eight ball trying to keep all our software and servers up to date and just solving the same problems over and over at a company that never learns anything. iím sure a pm job is just different flavors of the same bullshit but i feel like iíd get to effect more change.

but i also could use a lot more money, which would help paper over the other frustrations. what are good cloud technology certs? that az-900?

Handsome Ralph
Sep 3, 2004

Oh boy, posting!
That's where I'm a Viking!


salartarium posted:

Azure is temporarily giving out free vouchers for their AI certs if you do their Learn Module.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloudskillschallenge/ai/registration/2024#choose-your-challenge

Iíve confirmed you can double dip with the 30 Days to Learn challenge and after you complete the module for the AI cert you can use the 50% voucher on a different exam.

Few days late, but thanks! Free AI-900 here I come.

So I've been shadowing/talking to a lead networking engineer at work, and he suggested I pick a cloud cert path and start working at it now that my CCNA is done. I've already got my AZ-900, and my company primarily uses Azure stuff, so going to start tackling the AZ-104 at some point in the near future.

That said, how hard is it in comparison to the CCNA?

unknown
Nov 16, 2002
Ain't got no stinking title yet!


You do ITIL if you want to get into a (generally highly) regulated field like finance or things like heavy industry, public utilities where reproducible process is king.

Those jobs generally pay well and are stable, but can be boring as poo poo since every issue is managed (using ITIL processes) very well.

Hotel Kpro
Feb 24, 2011

owls don't go to school
Dinosaur Gum
Iím so close to finishing WGUís python class, just that and the capstone then Iím done with my degree. It got me thinking about future studying in terms of certs. My job seems more geared towards cybersecurity but my degree is in networking. I guess Iím wanting to know if itís worth it to keep studying for networking certs and pivot later, or to just continue down the cybersecurity track. Networking sounds like itíd be more fun but without a taste of the real thing it could be more bullshit than itís worth.

Moey
Oct 22, 2010

I LIKE TO MOVE IT

unknown posted:

You do ITIL if you want to get into a (generally highly) regulated field like finance or things like heavy industry, public utilities where reproducible process is king.

Those jobs generally pay well and are stable, but can be boring as poo poo since every issue is managed (using ITIL processes) very well.

Naw, every SMB will go through a few phases of management who decide that ITIL training/cert is required for all tech staff. 50% of em will bother training, 10% may even take the exam.

It will end up going nowhere because while some takes aways are great even for a smaller org, management will only try to carry on with the most useless points of framework.

Rinse/repeat every 6 or 8 years?

SlowBloke
Aug 14, 2017
Hot news for VMware certified professionals, start backing up your poo poo.

Broadcom fuckers posted:

Dear Slowbloke,

As of May 6, 2024, VMware by Broadcom will launch new learning platforms. MyLearn will no longer be used. Our new platforms will contribute to the development of a streamlined and efficient learning ecosystem as part of Broadcom's effort to unify its systems. These changes will enable us to better manage our educational resources.

What you need to do:
Screenshot course completion data: Please ensure that you have a record of your past completions by taking screenshots of your course completion data from the current portal by May 5, 2024. You may save this data for future reference. Go to https://mylearn.vmware.com and click on the myTranscripts tab.

Important Dates:
April 19, 2024 - Last to complete VCF Instructor-Led Classes on MyLearn.
May 5, 2024 - Last day to save myTransript course completion data.
May 6, 2024 - MyLearn registration portal will be retired, and the new Broadcom platform will launch.

Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience this may cause, and we appreciate your understanding during this migration process. A separate email will be sent providing detailed instructions about how to register for classes in the coming weeks.

Should you have any questions please contact us at eduoperations@vmware.com.

Cyks
Mar 17, 2008

The trenches of IT can scar a muppet for life
Well that sounds like an unnecessary gently caress you by Broadcom.

karthun
Nov 16, 2006

I forgot to post my food for USPOL Thanksgiving but that's okay too!

Cyks posted:

Well that sounds like an unnecessary gently caress you by Broadcom.

That's broadcom. I remember one time when we had a small dispute with broadcom, nothing major, and it was something really silly regards to licensing but broadcom went full balls to the walls and turned off everyone's access to docSafe. The email chirps for the next 4 hours as everyone's email box was filled up with "You no longer have access to document so_and_so on Broadcom docSafe."

Kazinsal
Dec 13, 2011



Cyks posted:

Well that sounds like an unnecessary gently caress you by Broadcom.

So, same as everything else they've done with VMware since the acquisition.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty


In case you werenít convinced that broadcom is fully comitted to gently caress everyone and milk the suckers who canít migrate away quickly, this is your sign to gtfo.

rafikki
Mar 8, 2008

I see what you did there. (It's pretty easy, since ducks have a field of vision spanning 340 degrees.)

~SMcD


I work for a VAR, got two customers getting screwed over on Symantec renewals right now and dumping them. Talked to plenty of others that see the writing on the wall for VMWare and are looking at other options too.

Tetramin
Apr 1, 2006

I'ma buck you up.

Hotel Kpro posted:

Iím so close to finishing WGUís python class, just that and the capstone then Iím done with my degree. It got me thinking about future studying in terms of certs. My job seems more geared towards cybersecurity but my degree is in networking. I guess Iím wanting to know if itís worth it to keep studying for networking certs and pivot later, or to just continue down the cybersecurity track. Networking sounds like itíd be more fun but without a taste of the real thing it could be more bullshit than itís worth.

Well it depends on where you think your career is headed. Networking is very enjoyable especially if you can find the right job where you donít have to deal with some of the worst of the repetitive BS.

Idk what certs you have right now, but at some point real world experience will be necessary/more important than getting more certs. I dont think anyone can tell you if you should chase networking or cybersec, but I will say that I always am baffled when I run into infosec people who know nothing about networking. IMO, you should have a solid handle on networks to be a good infosec engineer.

Cyks
Mar 17, 2008

The trenches of IT can scar a muppet for life
I could be way off base but I always felt like networking was easier to get your foot in the door and pivot to security. At least security that isnít just looking at logs for 8 hours a day though Iíve never worked a primarily security role. Whereas I can have an entry level network person go do physical work on day one.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob
Networking has historically been both the highly coveted role and also therefore the difficult-to-get-into role. Infosec supplanted it in at least the former because for a good while it was the role to collect fat paychecks for not very much work. I think the shine is off that apple now, as people realize that most infosec roles are not that interesting and not that glamorous, and the hype and therefore the money has cooled down. Cloud stuff and k8s is, I think, still the hottest sector at the moment.

I personally think that you need a handle on at least the basics of networking to be good in any infosec role. But there are a lot of people who are in infosec role who aren't good at it and remain in those roles, like the auditors who demand impossible things, some of which would be very alarming if you could comply with them.

"Network" roles can vary a lot in terms of what they actually entail, especially if you're in a very large, very siloed organization, so it would be good to have an idea of what kind of role you're looking for, although at the entry level you should probably take whatever you can get. You should also be prepared for a lot of gibberish from people who think networking needs to fix their non-networking problem because they don't understand networking.

Diva Cupcake
Aug 15, 2005

Back 10-15 years ago the saying at the bigcorp I worked for was that to even be considered within infosec you needed experience in at least two of the 3 primary infrastructure, networking, or developer roles.

Thats definitely not the case any more as there are probably 50x the number of jobs, from engineering to architecture to vuln management or GRC, writing loving policy. Now just find something you like doing to head in a direction. You can always pivot if you find it sucks.

ilkhan
Oct 7, 2004

I LOVE Musk and his pro-first-amendment ways. X is the future.
Bought the voucher for CCNA. I have 90 days to get it done. Time to get a movin'.

Hughmoris
Apr 21, 2007
Let's go to the abyss!

ilkhan posted:

Bought the voucher for CCNA. I have 90 days to get it done. Time to get a movin'.

:hfive:

I want to start studying for the CISSP but I'm currently doing in-house training for $job plus working on my Masters during off-hours. I can't muster the energy to tackle all three at once. I've grown old.

Hotel Kpro
Feb 24, 2011

owls don't go to school
Dinosaur Gum
Finally knocked out python, just have the capstone left then I'm done with my degree

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006

Passed the recert for my AWS Security specialty! Looking forward to a year of no cert studying!

I might go for the networking specialty next. Or get real crazy and go for CCNP or something. I miss networking some days.

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty


BaseballPCHiker posted:

Passed the recert for my AWS Security specialty! Looking forward to a year of no cert studying!

I might go for the networking specialty next. Or get real crazy and go for CCNP or something. I miss networking some days.

Congrats, I hear it has a lot of overlap with SA Pro. Might be worthwile persuing that if you havenít already.

DeathSandwich
Apr 24, 2008

I fucking hate puzzles.
So for someone in a mid level admin role going back to start collecting certs on the security side, am I better off getting the security+, or just jump straight to SSCP and use that as a building block towards getting my CISSP?

chin up everything sucks
Jan 29, 2012

DeathSandwich posted:

So for someone in a mid level admin role going back to start collecting certs on the security side, am I better off getting the security+, or just jump straight to SSCP and use that as a building block towards getting my CISSP?

Get your Sec+ since that specifically meets some DoD requirements in case you ever move jobs or need to be able to work with the US military. It's also something that HR/Recruiting recognize on sight, so it helps you get past them when applying for jobs.

Hotel Kpro
Feb 24, 2011

owls don't go to school
Dinosaur Gum
FML I only have a capstone left to graduate but it involves building a working network from scratch using packet tracer or GNS3. The two written reports I saw were about 80 pages long. I feel like this is going to be a second job just getting this done

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006

That won't be that much work depending on the scope they want honestly.

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Hotel Kpro
Feb 24, 2011

owls don't go to school
Dinosaur Gum
Yeah I see that it is doable and if everything goes right it wonít be so bad. I think the hardest part for me is getting started, and I canít do that without coming up with three of my own custom test cases for the network

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